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  • Appendices to the 2010-11 Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession | AAUP
    Institutions Post Tenure Review Retirement Sexual Diversity Gender Identity Teaching Evaluation Tenure Women in Higher Education Reports Publications AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home Appendices to the 2010 11 Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession Appendix I Individual Institutions with Professorial Ranks pdfs Alabama Florida Georgia Massachusetts Michigan Ohio Oklahoma Wyoming Appendix II Institutions Without Professional Ranks pdf Notes to Appendices I and II pdf Corrections to the 2010 11 Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession pdf Return to It s Not Over Yet The Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession 2010 11 Trigger Warnings A current threat to academic freedom comes from a demand that teachers provide warnings in advance if assigned material contains anything that might trigger difficult emotional responses for students Learn more Join the AAUP As an AAUP member you

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/reports-publications/2010-11salarysurveyappendices (2016-02-13)
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  • Appendices to the 2009-10 Report on the Economic Status of the Profession | AAUP
    Serving Institutions Post Tenure Review Retirement Sexual Diversity Gender Identity Teaching Evaluation Tenure Women in Higher Education Reports Publications AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home Appendices to the 2009 10 Report on the Economic Status of the Profession Appendix I Individual Institutions With Professorial Ranks Alabama Maryland pdf Massachusetts North Carolina pdf North Dakota Wyoming pdf Appendix II Institutions Without Professorial Ranks pdf Notes to Appendices I and II pdf Corrections to the 2009 10 Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession pdf Return to No Refuge The Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession 2009 10 Trigger Warnings A current threat to academic freedom comes from a demand that teachers provide warnings in advance if assigned material contains anything that might trigger difficult emotional responses for students Learn more Join the AAUP As an AAUP member you join

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/reports-publications/2009-10salarysurveyappendices (2016-02-13)
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  • Appendices to the 2008-09 Report on the Economic Status of the Profession | AAUP
    Workload Family Work Grading Graduate Students The Academic Bill of Rights Minority Serving Institutions Post Tenure Review Retirement Sexual Diversity Gender Identity Teaching Evaluation Tenure Women in Higher Education Reports Publications AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home Appendices to the 2008 09 Report on the Economic Status of the Profession Appendix I State tables for specific institutions pdfs Alabama Maryland Massachusetts North Carolina North Dakota Wyoming Appendix II Institutions without Academic Ranks pdf Corrections to the 2008 09 Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession pdf Trigger Warnings A current threat to academic freedom comes from a demand that teachers provide warnings in advance if assigned material contains anything that might trigger difficult emotional responses for students Learn more Join the AAUP As an AAUP member you join forces with colleagues who care about academic freedom and shared governance You help

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/reports-publications/2008-09salarysurveyappendices (2016-02-13)
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  • Appendices to the 2007-08 Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession | AAUP
    Hiring and Promotions Discrimination Diversity Affirmative Action Ethics Faculty Work Workload Family Work Grading Graduate Students The Academic Bill of Rights Minority Serving Institutions Post Tenure Review Retirement Sexual Diversity Gender Identity Teaching Evaluation Tenure Women in Higher Education Reports Publications AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home Appendices to the 2007 08 Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession Appendix I State Tables for specific institutions pdf Appendix II Two Year Institutions without Academic Ranks pdf Trigger Warnings A current threat to academic freedom comes from a demand that teachers provide warnings in advance if assigned material contains anything that might trigger difficult emotional responses for students Learn more Join the AAUP As an AAUP member you join forces with colleagues who care about academic freedom and shared governance You help protect quality higher education and shape the future of our

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/reports-publications/2007-08salarysurveyappendices (2016-02-13)
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  • Reeling In the Years | AAUP
    TAA orbit The TAA was an exciting and sometimes maddening site for serious political activity This became clear to me at the very first TAA meeting I attended in fall 1973 as a newly minted TA and newly elected shop steward for the history department affiliate My main memory of that first meeting is the long contentious and ultimately satisfying discussion of a new health plan just going into effect After a timid looking university or insurance company bureaucrat I cannot recall which offered the basic outlines of the new plan the floor opened up for questions Members pressed the speaker politely but forcefully for specifics on coverage for abortion and gynecological services pregnancy and parental leave I soon learned that most of these questions came from a very active reproductive rights caucus empowered by the recent Roe v Wade decision Every Sunday night I attended weekly stewards council meetings where we served as a kind of union steering committee responsible for the everyday functioning of the TAA The affiliate structure had been crucial for organizing the TAA and for ensuring democracy in union affairs Although the membership also elected an executive board of officers the powers vested in the stewards council reflected a deep distrust of autocratic leadership and a sometimes naive faith in decentralized power Affiliates were the most effective site for drawing in new members addressing specific concerns unique to individual departments and crucially reproducing leadership Due to the revolving door nature of the membership union activists had to spend an enormous amount of time and energy on educating our TA colleagues These efforts provided a foundation for the TAA s unique internal political culture in at least two ways First the union developed a conscious thoughtfully articulated sometimes contested collective memory that we all felt responsible for keeping alive and passing on One rarely heard a speech wrote a pamphlet signed up a new member or debated a policy without invoking the union s own history especially its concrete gains Those of us engaged in organizing work learned an invaluable lesson you have to give people reasons to join and victories they can see Second the TAA also operated as an incubator for political activists For many UW graduate students the TAA served as an introduction not just to unionism but also to politics in the broadest sense and to the radical critique of American education and society in particular An awful lot of people who got their political feet wet in the TAA probably thousands over the years took their experiences and analyses to schools trade unions women s groups and grassroots political formations all over the country and around the world TAA involvement with the larger labor movement was a central goal during the 1970s In early 1974 after sustained sometimes tiresome debate we voted to affiliate with the American Federation of Teachers part of the AFL CIO and the TAA became Local 3220 of the AFT Like many I was able to swallow the idea of paying part of Albert Shanker s salary on behalf of a greater good AFT affiliation offered new strength in unity with the labor movement as well as the possibility of helping to democratize that labor movement In the years since a number of TAA members have become leading figures in the Madison Federation of Labor the Wisconsin Federation of Teachers and the Wisconsin AFL CIO Others have become activists and staffers in Teamsters locals and teachers unions around the country Anyone who has ever worked under the terms of a collective bargaining agreement understands that contracts are only as effective as their enforcement Internally the TAA in the early and mid 1970s focused on consolidating our gains by aggressively running grievances continual organizing among new TAs and what seemed like endless bargaining sessions with university administrators for new contracts With no paid staffers TAA stewards and officers performed the bulk of this often technical and always time consuming work on a volunteer basis The university s shrewd manipulation of our ambiguous legal status made the job that much more difficult The 1969 Structure Agreement recognized the TAA as the legal bargaining agent for all TAs and established the framework for negotiating When the university resisted union efforts to bargain for wages and bring unfair labor practice charges legal rights for all other state employees the TAA appealed to the Wisconsin Employment Relations Commission But the WERC refused to support the TAA on the grounds that TAs were unclassified state employees and not within their jurisdiction This lack of a clear legal status always loomed over TAA bargaining strategy in the 1970s and early 1980s Not until 1985 did the Wisconsin legislature pass a law guaranteeing TAs the same bargaining rights enjoyed by other state employees The defensive nature of our struggle as well as the problematic gap between leadership and membership became much clearer to me in 1975 76 when I served as a member of the TAA bargaining committee for the union s fourth contract Working with the more experienced TAA negotiators and going head to head with UW administrators gave me a valuable political education in the inner workings of the modern American university We focused on four major issues that year limits on class size meaningful educational planning by TAs and students a cost of living wage escalator the right to arbitrate all grievances and public access to university budget and instructional reports But in each case we were responding to administration take backs or failures to abide by contract provisions That fall the administration had unilaterally raised the class size average from nineteen to twenty one students per section to be averaged departmentally rather than by course Consequently some courses were overloaded to twenty five or more students per section To resist the drift toward larger classes we also proposed that undergraduates in a lecture course presently taught without small group discussion sections have the right to evaluate and determine whether discussion sections

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/article/reeling-years (2016-02-13)
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  • Angry Badgers | AAUP
    news that reformers were making similar demands in other states but stubbornly insisted that Wisconsin was uniquely suited to serve as a laboratory for democracy German and Scandinavian immigrants had volunteered and died in large numbers in the Civil War crusade against slavery Likewise Socialist impulses had come early and remained in place for generations especially in Milwaukee where Socialists held the mayor s office for a half century Isolationist sentiment also had wide support among those Wisconsinites who suspected that it was Wall Street financiers who craved war profits and lobbied heavily for them in Congress Progressive legislation at the state level provided national precedents Wisconsin for example created the first effective workers compensation program in 1911 Most of all Progressives and Socialists wanted to make life better on the home front A host of reforms successfully regulated working conditions in factories including the hours worked by women and children promoted the establishment of farming cooperatives instituted a state income tax and encouraged public health programs and major conservation initiatives Fighting Bob La Follette backed by farmers and workers went on to serve in the US Senate from 1906 to 1925 He died reputedly of exhaustion just months after completing his 1924 presidential campaign Many of his ideas and some of his slogans reappeared in the New Deal under the auspices of Franklin D Roosevelt and the Brain Trust In Wisconsin the La Follette legacy lived on in its own name Which shall rule La Follette had asked channeling nineteenth century state supreme court judge Edward G Ryan Wealth or man Which shall lead money or intellect Who shall fill public stations educated and patriotic free men or the feudal serfs of corporate wealth The questions that first Ryan then La Follette posed decades ago suddenly reappeared prominently in the demonstrations of February and March 2011 as did two clean government measures that his followers had bequeathed to later generations of voters referendum and especially recall Likewise no wonder that latter day La Folletteites singled out two of the governor s key financial backers Charles G and David Koch pronounced coke the billionaire brothers from Kansas who had contributed so generously to Walker s election campaign Apparently aiming to make Wisconsin a model case for a nationwide attack upon the social state one Koch organization Americans for Prosperity set up a branch office barely a block from the capitol facilitating easy access to the governor s office One of the most popular messages on protest signs read Gov Walker Is a Koch Head The governor was hardly more than an agent La Follette probably would have said for the monied outsiders who had no real interest in the welfare of Wisconsin citizens Protesters also organized substantial withdrawal events directed at another major Walker backer M I Bank It was hardly surprising then that as the occupation of the capitol eased popular committees formed to begin recall elections of all eligible Republican legislators By Wisconsin law the governor himself is subject to recall only in early 2012 after serving one full year in office Eligible Republican legislators however including some of Walker s chief supporters would be vulnerable sooner and pledges were gathered to initiate a recall referendum for Walker himself for January 2012 The mark of La Follette upon the recall tactic was indelible Hardly any Wisconsinites needed help in translating the Twitter speak shorthand that appeared on protest signs WWFBD What indeed would Fighting Bob do La Follette would surely have cheered the campaign led by public employees unions some of them actually founded in Wisconsin He would have welcomed without reservation the participation of students and faculty alike from the state s chief educational institution the land grant University of Wisconsin Madison Over the generations UW faculty members had worked with state legislators to draft path breaking bills on issues ranging from workers compensation and unemployment insurance to collective bargaining rights In early 2011 the newest generation of UW teachers responded in a variety of ways to Walker s challenge One Madison faculty group lost no time in putting up a Facebook page UW Madison Faculty Organizing for Change to share information about events responding to the governor s proposed legislation especially those aspects dealing with collective bargaining health insurance and pensions Outside of Madison faculty members issued their own challenge to Walker by voting to unionize While the UW Madison faculty had demurred the faculties at several other campuses in the UW system had joined the Association of University of Wisconsin Professionals a lobbying group affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers AFT After Walker introduced the budget repair bill they voted overwhelmingly to form bargaining units By the end of March faculty and academic staff members at the University of Wisconsin s Stout La Crosse and River Falls campuses had joined the Eau Claire campus in establishing AFT Wisconsin unions In the face of provisions in the budget repair bill that would effectively dismantle state unions collective bargaining looked better and better to people as a means of protecting the university system Others found their own voices Faculty members at the University of Wisconsin Whitewater still not unionized nonetheless composed a collective letter to Governor Walker underscoring the harm his budget reductions would do to them as a faculty and especially to students at all levels Heading into an unseasonably cold weekend in late March a small group of UW Whitewater professors actually walked forty three miles from their campus to the capitol to hand deliver their missive Meanwhile state employees and large numbers of UW faculty across the system pledged solidarity with other state workers the elementary and high school teachers corrections officers and nurses who all swelled the ranks of protesters What did these nonacademics have in common along with their job status The majority were graduates of one branch or another of the University of Wisconsin Faculty members spoke at the capitol rallies and smaller simultaneous protests from Green Bay to River

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/article/angry-badgers (2016-02-13)
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  • Proposals Threaten Wisconsin Higher Ed | AAUP
    Sexual Diversity Gender Identity Teaching Evaluation Tenure Women in Higher Education Reports Publications AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home NEWS AAUP UPDATES Proposals Threaten Wisconsin Higher Ed In a letter sent today to the University of Wisconsin regents and system president the AAUP urges them to fight against budget language that would remove tenure and due process procedures from state statutes and severely curtail due process rights for University of Wisconsin faculty and academic staff The proposed changes in tenure and due process and a 250 million proposed cut to the UW System amount to a direct attack on higher education as a public good a vision of higher education that has shaped the UW System from the formulation of the Wisconsin Idea in 1904 to the present day File AAUP WI Regents pdf Publication Date Wednesday June 3 2015 Tags University of

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/news/proposals-threaten-wisconsin-higher-ed (2016-02-13)
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  • AAUP and AFT-Wisconsin Stand Together | AAUP
    Review Retirement Sexual Diversity Gender Identity Teaching Evaluation Tenure Women in Higher Education Reports Publications AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home NEWS AAUP UPDATES AAUP and AFT Wisconsin Stand Together The AAUP and AFT Wisconsin stand together in condemning the attacks on higher education that the Wisconsin Legislature included in its biennial budget which Governor Walker signed into law last Monday We call on the University of Wisconsin Board of Regents and the UW System and campus level administrations to work with their faculty and academic staff to reconstitute the language previously included in Chapter 36 into system wide and campus policies See our statement File In the wake of legislative attacks on higher education in the state the we call on regents administrators and faculty and aca Publication Date Monday July 20 2015 Tags Wisconsin AFT Wisconsin Governor Walker University of Wisconsin

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/news/aaup-and-aft-wisconsin-stand-together (2016-02-13)
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