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  • College and University Governance: University of Iowa | AAUP
    I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home AAUP Policies Reports Academic Freedom and Tenure Investigative Reports College and University Governance Reports Standing Committee and Subcommittee Reports Audit Reports View All Reports Back to Reports and Publications AAUP Redbook The eleventh edition of the Redbook contains foundational AAUP policy documents as well as reports on new issues in higher education Buy yours now College and University Governance University of Iowa Download College and University Governance University of Iowa This report describes departures from shared governance standards in the hiring of new University of Iowa President J Bruce Harreld appointed by the Iowa Board of Regents in spite of overwhelming objections from faculty The investigation found that in contrast to historical practice at the university which had been to involve faculty fully in presidential searches the board designed this search process specifically to prevent any meaningful faculty role in the selection of the final candidate After UI Board of Regents President Bruce Rastetter disbanded the 21 member presidential search committee that had included six faculty members the regents appointed Harreld who was far less qualified than three other semi finalists who each had strong academic credentials and support from faculty and other members of the campus community On September 8 the faculty senate voted no confidence in the board for its blatant disregard for the shared nature of university governance In response to a request from Katherine Tachau president of the UI AAUP chapter AAUP national executive director Julie Schmid appointed an ad hoc investigating committee to assess the situation Members of the committee were Matthew Finkin chair of the investigating committee and professor of law at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign and Michael DeCesare chair of the AAUP

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/college-and-university-governance-university-iowa (2016-02-13)
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  • College and University Governance: Union County College | AAUP
    Diversity Gender Identity Teaching Evaluation Tenure Women in Higher Education Reports Publications AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home AAUP Policies Reports Academic Freedom and Tenure Investigative Reports College and University Governance Reports Standing Committee and Subcommittee Reports Audit Reports View All Reports Back to Reports and Publications AAUP Redbook The eleventh edition of the Redbook contains foundational AAUP policy documents as well as reports on new issues in higher education Buy yours now College and University Governance Union County College Download UCC Report This report describes severe departures from generally accepted standards of academic governance at Union County College in Cranford New Jersey The report was written by former AAUP president Robert A Gorman an emeritus professor of labor law at the University of Pennsylvania Acting on behalf of the AAUP in response to faculty complaints of governance and academic freedom violations Gorman sought to meet with representatives of the faculty administration and governing boards to mediate between them and to report on the situation President Margaret M McMenamin however declined to meet with Gorman as did the chairs of the college s two governing boards The report details how McMenamin sharply diminished the role and influence of the faculty in the college s governance system Though governance is not a mandatory subject of collective bargaining under New Jersey law administrations of other public New Jersey institutions of higher education voluntarily agree to include provisions on faculty governance in the collective bargaining agreement

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/college-and-university-governance-union-county-college (2016-02-13)
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  • Busting the Myths: The Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession, 2014-15 | AAUP
    more useful question would be whether average salaries of faculty in a particular field are higher or lower than the salaries of those in a comparable professional setting The US Department of Labor s Bureau of Labor Statistics tracks the average and estimated salaries of a wide variety of occupations allowing us to compare salaries in higher education with those of similar professionals in nonacademic settings For purposes of comparison it is important to identify occupations whose employment characteristics in a professional setting most closely approximate those of tenure track faculty We selected only occupations that 1 were full time 2 required a doctorate or other advanced professional degree 3 required no prior work experience in a related occupation at entry for example becoming a judge generally requires prior law experience 4 required no on the job training and 5 have historically offered stable long term employment Bureau of Labor Statistics data average the salary for a professional occupation overall but we used salaries of full professors for the comparison The majority of the faculty of course make much less than these senior faculty members many serving on part time appointments do not earn professional salaries at all If any faculty members are overpaid however surely full professor salaries would offer an indication of just how overpaid the most highly compensated faculty members are The Bureau of Labor Statistics provides data on a great number of occupations and on subfields within those occupations wherever possible we have attempted to use the closest professional analog to full professors For example a lawyer in the legal services area which makes up the majority of the field has a substantially lower average salary 138 140 than a lawyer in the subfield of securities and commodity exchanges 188 430 which is why we selected the former Fact 2 Relative to professionals in comparable occupations even the highest ranking tenured professors are generally underpaid Table C presents selected data that meet our criteria for comparison Astronomer is the only profession in Table C for which faculty salaries are higher than salaries in a nonacademic professional setting Full professors on average make only 6 5 percent more than astronomers employed in nonacademic professional settings hardly a ridiculous figure When one compares the average salary of faculty members at all ranks to that of professional astronomers arguably a fairer comparison because we are comparing a full group to a full group college and university faculty make only about 77 cents on the dollar In the remaining professions selected all of which are made up mostly of nonacademic employees professors make less on average than those in nonacademic professional settings These findings do not necessarily suggest that those in other professional settings are overpaid Our intent is simply to refute claims that faculty are overpaid as a result of inefficiencies within higher education Although faculty earn less in the majority of the occupations presented it is worth noting that key differences exist between academic and nonacademic settings and that faculty may be motivated by factors other than maximizing their salary Many faculty members enjoy teaching and mentoring the next generation in their fields an opportunity that is largely unavailable in other professional settings Higher education offers more flexibility than many other work environments a major advantage for those seeking flexible schedules Research has found that people who have a positive work life balance tend to report higher job satisfaction Those who work in nonacademic settings do not have the academic freedom to conduct research that tenured and tenure track faculty members have Tenure track faculty like government workers traditionally have been willing to trade the higher salaries of the private sector for greater employment security Indeed the AAUP s 1915 Declaration of Principles on Academic Freedom and Academic Tenure sought in part to establish policies that would render the profession more attractive to men and women of high ability and strong personality by insuring the dignity the independence and the reasonable security of tenure of the professional office Today however the profession may be in danger of losing its attractiveness because of the radical erosion of compensation especially for part time positions and the decline of tenure Myth 3 Disruptive innovation necessitates radical reductions in tenure track faculty While many faculty members view higher education as a public good rather than a product in a competitive marketplace this perception is under increasing pressure from advocates of neoliberal approaches to higher education Increasingly senior administrators see their institutions as competitors in a rapidly changing sector of the economy Traditional colleges and universities they say must adapt and respond to the threat posed by online for profit institutions whose academic labor force consists largely of part time non tenure track faculty Some administrators have attempted to adopt or perhaps co opt a disruptive framework that borrows from concepts developed by the business theorist Clayton Christensen The theory of disruptive innovation outlined by Christensen in a series of articles and books is one of the more influential business ideas of the past half century Few theories have transcended disciplinary boundaries to spawn their own conferences and thrust terms such as disruption and disruptors into the popular lexicon in the way that Christensen s has Many faculty members are understandably skeptical of the theory of disruptive innovation it is after all a theory that administrations have invoked to justify the shuttering of departments and the hiring of more faculty members in part time positions with very low compensation For the purposes of argument however let s assume that administrators are right to see themselves as responding to disruptors in the market Does a careful analysis within the framework of Christensen s theory bear out the notion that increasing the proportion of part time non tenure track positions is an effective strategy for dealing with disruptive innovation According to Christensen disruptive innovation is a process whereby a new competitor the disruptor enters a market at the bottom by producing a simpler lower quality and generally more accessible product Established organizations reluctant to defend the lowest and least profitable sector of the market shift production to higher quality sectors in response only to have those sectors successively encroached on by the disruptor Over time according to the theory quality improves and established organizations are led to the point of extinction For example in the automobile industry Toyota entered the market as a low end manufacturer competing against Ford and General Motors with the Corona and Tercel before competing in the middle of the car market with the Camry and the high end with Lexus 12 Now the world s largest automobile manufacturer Toyota is facing disruptive innovations at the bottom of the car market from emerging South Korean manufacturers Hyundai and Kia The clarity and simplicity of the theory of disruptive innovation has enabled it to proliferate to a variety of different sectors including higher education 13 For the first time newer entrants into higher education can use technological innovations in online instruction to produce simpler lower quality and generally more accessible content than would be available at established bricks and mortar institutions of higher education Online institutions such as the University of Phoenix Western Governors University and Kaplan University have recently been improving the quality of their offerings in a concerted effort to move up market and challenge existing institutions of higher education Some people believe that the unprecedented challenge of low cost online education will make relatively expensive full time tenured faculty obsolete Such views were recently expressed on a panel of higher education experts convened by the American Council on Education to examine and explore new models inspired by the disruptive potential of new educational innovations The resulting white paper which was sponsored by a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation concluded We invite institutions to consider redesigning faculty roles to ensure that institutional missions and particularly students are being served For example campuses such as The Evergreen State College WA Hampshire College MA and The University of Texas of the Permian Basin have redesigned their faculty roles with new contracts responsibilities and appointments these institutions have never had a form of tenure in place 14 Fact 3 Disruptive innovations do not necessitate reductions in the proportion of full time or tenured faculty In response to disruptive innovations organizations often try to compete with entrants at the bottom of the market by cutting costs in the sector where entry competition is the greatest and adopting some of the technological innovations that offer disruptors leverage Some colleges and universities have pursued this strategy by reducing the proportion of full time and tenured faculty and relying increasingly on part time instructional faculty thereby reducing instructional costs What effect is this having Figure 4 presents the distribution of instructional staff by rank in 2013 the most recent year for which data are available through IPEDS at all Title IV eligible degree granting institutions that enroll first time full time undergraduates Historically faculty have been classified as primarily instructional when at least 50 percent of their activity is associated with teaching Primarily instructional activity is represented in the bar on the left hand side of the figure Data on institutions unable to disaggregate faculty or institutions where at least 50 percent of faculty activity is a combination of instruction research and public service have been presented in the center bar The bar on the right hand side of the figure presents the combined unduplicated total of faculty reported in the first two bars for those institutions reporting data To provide some perspective in 1975 full time tenured and tenure track faculty composed 45 10 percent of the total instructional faculty Today only 20 35 percent of instructional faculty are full time and tenure track The combined proportion of full time tenured 19 51 percent and full time tenure track 7 37 percent faculty together does not match that of the full time tenured instructional faculty 29 percent of four decades ago In their place is an army of part time instructional staff and graduate teaching assistants While there are many fine graduate teaching assistants and part time instructional faculty the reliance on these positions because they generally lack the economic security of tenured appointments institutional commitment to professional development and adequate working conditions does not align with the vision of most institutional missions particularly as they pertain to students As the AAUP s 2010 report Tenure and Teaching Intensive Appointments noted a broad and growing front of research shows that the system of permanently temporary faculty appointments has negative consequences for student learning Some of this research has found that temporary faculty struggle to provide the same quality of instruction as full time faculty and that this has had an impact on retention particularly among those at two year institutions or in four year gateway introductory courses 15 The report goes on to note that faculty on contingent appointments frequently pay for their own computers phones and office supplies and dip into their own wallets for journal subscriptions and travel to conferences to stay current in their fields while struggling to preserve academic freedom However heroic these individual acts are no substitute for professional working conditions The students are not the only ones who suffer in this educational environment Recent research has shown that job insecurity in higher education harms the mental well being of non tenure track faculty A substantial number report feelings of stress anxiety and depression associated with their position 16 It seems clear that established institutions of higher education are attempting to compete with educational disruptors by hiring increasing numbers of part time faculty However the question remains are established institutions actually reducing their instructional costs as a result of these savings Certainly one would expect that shifting instructional costs from full time tenured faculty to part time contingent faculty would result in substantial savings to the institution in the form of lower instructional salary costs Figure 5 presents the year over year change in public institution compensation and nonsalaried expenditure as a percentage of the total instructional expenditure a good proxy for how money is being spent in the instructional area often on things like lab supplies and equipment dedicated to fulfilling an institution s instructional mission Although full time faculty saw an average compensation increase of 1 39 percent unadjusted for inflation there was a 5 49 percent increase in nonsalaried instructional expenditure during the most recent five year period While the ranks of full time faculty were declining it appears that the majority of the increased nonsalaried instructional spending occurred in the 2009 10 academic year More recent years have seen low to flat increases in nonsalaried instruction never exceeding a 2 percent year over year increase This finding seems contrary to a higher education strategy of defending the instructional market from disruptive innovators If established institutions were trying to compete with the disruptors who overwhelmingly rely on part time faculty one would expect significant nonsalaried instructional budget expansion as public institutions retrain and retool faculty for more online instructional capacity building but this has not happened in recent years Although a steep decline occurred in the fiscal year immediately following the Great Recession instructional budgets stabilized at that reduced level and most subsequent years saw a decline of less than half a percentage point presumably during the time when disruptors should have been gaining ground against established institutions of higher education If administrators at two and four year public institutions are not spending additional funds in the nonsalaried instructional area they must believe either that disruptors are not a significant threat or that disruption can be marginalized at current spending levels This seems like a curious way to try to compete against disruptors as technological innovation has the potential to offer disruptors a substantial competitive advantage to boost quality rapidly and expand further into the higher education sector At present it is unclear why public colleges and universities would see a competitive advantage in reducing full time and tenured faculty if they were not going to use those savings to improve their own technological innovation in instruction and thus reduce any potential advantage disruptors could leverage in that area Reducing full time and tenured appointments simply to plug budgetary holes elsewhere seems a poor long term strategy for administrators who see themselves as competing against disruptive innovators More fundamentally the belief that disruptive innovations necessitate the reduction of full time or tenured faculty is a misdiagnosis of a major challenge disruptive innovations present to established institutions of higher education Most disruptive innovators follow a single business model which allows for lower overhead and greater efficiency and thus offers a competitive advantage As Clayton Christensen has argued most colleges and universities have three separate business models a process model where students pay to matriculate through an institution a solutions model where agencies willing to have their problems resolved through research subsidize that research and a facilitated networks model where alumni generate revenue Multiple business models generally create greater inefficiencies and higher overall costs These inefficiencies can for the most part be managed and do not constitute exigent circumstances Thus the organizational complexity of established institutions of higher education not full time faculty instructional costs poses a substantial challenge Disruptive innovators in higher education also have a competitive advantage over existing institutions because they tend to offer a lower degree of specialization than many established colleges and universities For example at most colleges and universities there are a great number of disciplines a student can study as well as multiple degrees offered in those disciplines Furthermore bricks and mortar college and university campuses offer library resources as well as other amenities A high degree of specialization if efficiently managed can be a strength of existing institutions and would rarely if ever necessitate a reduction of full time faculty As Christensen and his colleagues write They established institutions aspire to become excellent in every field of research and instruction and to provide any course of study that any student might want The beginning of a permanent solution for almost all universities is that they must choose in what area they will be excellent It is only through focus that these institutions can reduce complexity And it is only by reducing complexity that they can substantially reduce costs Laying off faculty or administrative staff across the board or freezing employee salaries while leaving the basic mission and structure of the institutions unchanged is akin to straightening the deck chairs on the Titanic It will not solve the problem of economic viability in the short run or the longer run and it may very well drivequality faculty out and exacerbate and accelerate the institutions demise 17 In short even within Christensen s framework full time tenure track and tenured faculty are not the problem they are a large part of the solution Strategic hiring can facilitate unit and institutional improvement that would transform a dynamic higher education landscape into one whereby new online technologies are incorporated by high quality full time faculty who are able to showcase their talents which remain in demand Since disruptive innovators do not pose a threat that necessitates a reduction in full time faculty at established institutions conversion to tenure combined with proportional expectations for service and professional development for those who wish to remain in the profession on a part time basis is the best way to stabilize the faculty This is the approach outlined in Tenure and Teaching Intensive Appointments Exploring strategies to improve budgeting incorporating greater technological innovation in education with faculty involvement efficiently managing specialization and stabilizing part time faculty through conversion offer an excellent framework for improving the quality of higher education that would not significantly compromise accessibility This strategy would pose a significant challenge to any potential disruptor Myth 4 Faculty benefits are a primary driver of cost in higher education As we have noted increasing tuition prices have

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/reports-publications/2014-15salarysurvey (2016-02-13)
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  • Previous Academe Issues | AAUP
    Minority Serving Institutions Post Tenure Review Retirement Sexual Diversity Gender Identity Teaching Evaluation Tenure Women in Higher Education Reports Publications AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home Reports Publications Academe Current Issue Previous Issues Contact Advertising Submissions Subscriptions Check out the current issue Visit the Academe Blog The Academe Blog is an extension of the magazine exploring a wide range of topics including academic freedom governance of colleges and universities working conditions and more AAUP Redbook The eleventh edition of the Redbook contains foundational AAUP policy documents as well as reports on new issues in higher education Buy yours now Previous Academe Issues 2016 Issues January February 2016 2015 Issues November December 2015 September October 2015 July August 2015 The Bulletin May June 2015 March April 2015 The Compensation Survey January February 2015 2014 Issues November December 2014 September October 2014 July August 2014 The Bulletin May June 2014 March April 2014 The Compensation Survey January February 2014 2013 Issues November December 2013 September October 2013 July August 2013 The Bulletin May June 2013 March April 2013 The Compensation Survey January February 2013 2012 Issues November December 2012 September October 2012 July August 2012 The Bulletin May June 2012 March April 2012 The Compensation Survey January February 2012 2011 Issues November December 2011 September October 2011 The 2011 Bulletin July August 2011 May June 2011 March April 2011 The Compensation Survey January February 2011 2010 Issues November December 2010 September October 2010 The 2010

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/reports-and-publications/academe/previous (2016-02-13)
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  • Steven Salaita, the Media, and the Struggle for Academic Freedom | AAUP
    in the national media only the Washington Post assigned a reporter to cover the annual meeting With the exception of the higher education media most outlets used AP or other wire reports The Post assigned five different reporters and commentators to events from the Salaita dismissal to Wise s own dismissal a year later coverage that surpassed that of the New York Times Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune Consistent vociferous defenses of Steven Salaita emanated from progressive news websites specializing in Middle East reporting including Ali Abunimah s Electronic Intifada Philip Weiss and Adam Horowitz s Mondoweiss and Ray Hanania s Arab Daily News Israeli media also covered the Salaita case and his furious critique of Israel s Operation Protective Edge which he said did not honor the principle of noncombatant immunity during war The Jerusalem Post was clearly opposed to the appointment Its op eds on the case were uniformly supportive of the action to revoke Salaita s contract In one op ed Illinois A University with Principles Sherwin Pomerantz a University of Illinois alumnus compared Salaita s antiwar tweets to shouting fire falsely in a theater and causing injury and death He defended the decision to dismiss Salaita on the grounds that Jewish students who enroll in his courses might feel quite uncomfortable Cary Nelson past president of the AAUP and a prominent supporter of Wise s decision to dismiss Salaita appeared twice on the Jerusalem Post op ed page On October 25 2014 while describing himself as a Zionist Nelson charged that Salaita s scholarship was anti Semitic On December 25 2014 he averred The contract offer should never have been made in the first place rejecting arguments that Salaita s academic freedom was violated Reporting on the AAUP s censure a Jerusalem Post headline pronounced U of Illinois Censured after Rescinding Job Offer to Professor over Anti Israel Tweets It harkened back to the McCarthy era in the United States when critics of American foreign policy were purged for anti Americanism In Haaretz a relatively liberal Israeli newspaper Neta Alexander wrote an extensive piece under the headline I Am No Anti Semite Says Steven Salaita Underneath was a subheading So is there still freedom of speech in the U S The December 5 2014 article included a Skype interview with Salaita The piece also included another dramatic image of pro academic freedom Illinois students protesting with mouths taped shut with the written exhortation Support Salaita The image surfaced again on January 30 2015 in another Alexander article with a Jerusalem Post like headline Anti Israel Professor and for a third time five months later in a Haaretz report on the AAUP s censure After a lull in reportage following the censure of the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign there were dramatic developments including administrative changes that occurred on campus Wise was forced to resign in August 2015 after revelations that she had used a personal e mail account to avoid Freedom of Information Act requests Hundreds of e mails from private accounts contained university related business including those related to the Salaita matter As controversy grew and departmental votes of no confidence spread across the campus Wise and her faculty confrères Nicholas Burbules Gutgsell Endowed Professor of Education Policy and Joyce Tolliver associate professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese had attempted damage control They wanted to get a pro Wise op ed in the Champaign News Gazette Burbules sent four e mails to Wise on August 13 and August 15 2014 reassuring the beleaguered chancellor that help was on the way Joyce and I have submitted a piece to the News Gazette to clear up some of the misconceptions Later that night in another e mail he predicted It s going to be published and included a copy of the draft It appeared on Sunday August 17 and Wise responded in an e mail Thank you so much for taking the time to compose such a well reasoned op ed I just wish that you and we did not have to spend time on this But since we do it is so reassuring to know that I we have the support of respected faculty like you The following day Provost Ilesanmi Adesida who would also resign in the wake of the private e mail revelations praised the op ed in an e mail to Wise and the professors He noted there was additional anti Salaita coverage in the paper Two days after the op ed appeared the News Gazette published my op ed Illinois AAUP Defends Salaita s Academic Freedom In it I defended the principle of academic freedom and directly challenged the Burbules Tolliver defense of summary dismissal Academic Freedom Activism It is one thing to obtain media coverage after an AAUP censure It is quite another to induce the media to cover a case as it is unfolding on a college campus It has proven beneficial to the Illinois conference to secure quick media coverage of a violation of AAUP principles whether it be over an inappropriate denial of tenure Norman Finkelstein at DePaul and John Boyle at censured Northeastern Illinois University punitive section reduction of an adjunct s course on Israel and Palestine Iymen Chehade at Columbia College Chicago or the egregious replacement of numerous tenured faculty with term appointments censured National Louis University The following are suggestions for those engaged in the academic freedom struggle Some complainants do not desire publicity Their wishes must be respected Sometimes publicity leads to greater resistance on the part of a college or university administration However a public airing of a case is more likely to induce administrative reversal or compromise as was evident in the Chehade case When the Illinois AAUP conference s Committee A wrote a report that received press coverage in local media and the Chronicle of Higher Education the administration restored Chehade s other section of the course which had been previously eliminated after a student complaint about

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/article/steven-salaita-media-and-struggle-academic-freedom (2016-02-13)
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  • Untold Stories and Difficult Truths about Bias in Academia | AAUP
    struggles with conscious bias particularly during the civil rights era are well known Unconscious bias by contrast is not easy to identify admit or discuss Such bias may be the elephant in the room during admissions recruitment hiring and promotion and tenure processes I have often wondered about how unconscious bias contributes to the bottlenecks that occur in academia While the characteristics of students admitted to colleges and universities have changed the number of minority and women professors department chairs deans and top executives continues to lag During my twenty year academic career at public research universities I have been the first minority female professor the first minority and first female department chair and the first minority and first female dean It is disappointing to move up the ladder of success and still witness limitations imposed by others for reasons that have nothing to do with ability and qualifications Search committees because they are composed of individuals with different perspectives and perceptions afford a measure of protection against bias and increase the possibility of fairness and equity in the search process Yet no process is without vulnerabilities Individual committee members or people with hiring authority sometimes use the search process to legitimize the hiring of a preselected candidate I have even seen situations where unnecessary obstacles seem to have been erected to inconvenience and frustrate other candidates Furthermore in my experience the preselected candidate is not generally the most qualified for the position although that candidate is always presented as the best choice A preselected candidate is often simply the person with whom others in the organization for whatever reason feel the most comfortable Such hires are unfair to other candidates however and are damaging to employers They create workplaces that lack diversity in knowledge experience opinions and other characteristics that may benefit the organization I have also observed situations in which individuals similarities to others in the organization have elicited negative reactions for example when a candidate s field of study is almost identical to the specialization of a researcher already employed by the department or when a faculty member covets his or her status as one of a few minorities within a department In such cases individuals on search committees may be biased consciously or unconsciously against candidates who are perceived as threats These candidates may be dismissed from serious consideration not because of a lack of qualifications for the position but because of the possible impact their selection could have on one or more members of the group Then there are the candidates who do not look the part In academia middle aged or older men have long predominated in upper level administrative and executive positions when most people picture a university president or a college dean this is the kind of person who comes to mind And the pervasiveness of this mental image may unconsciously influence the selection and advancement of like candidates through the search process In these situations the search committee never grasps the

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/article/untold-stories-and-difficult-truths-about-bias-academia (2016-02-13)
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  • Professor, Say Hi to the Devil! | AAUP
    Twitterpates Still others blame the damning delusions of video games and MTV reality shows A few blame it on the devilish sleight of hand that has replaced aptitude the capacity to learn and master a discipline with app titude the capacity to operate a machine application Beyond these skirmishes of the war in digital heaven the infernal afterglow of No Child Left Behind with its bubble filler tests and excerpted contextless readings also comes in for much finger pointing So too does a have it all now consumer lifestyle for leading students down the primrose path of spending too little time becoming scholars and too much time earning dollars past even the undeniable need to cover the rising costs of college We also blame the hellish effects the Great Recession has had on a campus like ours one that serves a region in which nearly a third of the populace lives below the poverty line Or we point reluctantly to that lingering grand deception the one that says everyone ought to go to college whether or not they have any genuine intellectual interest in doing such a thing because we their forebears hope that by overselling the work of the head we might dodge the effects of our outsourcing and automating the work of the hand And then there s the explanation that points to the student as entitled customer Both the academic left and the academic right have the number of that beast on speed dial The right in its critique of our educational pandemonium emphasizes the ridiculousness of the entitled part of that student description misguided social promotion identity politics the fetishization of self esteem to the point that many current members of the student body think they re solar powered because educators and parents have blown so much sunshine up their posteriors The left in its critique emphasizes the lunacy of the customer part of that student description the Apple of temptation that calls us to accept the remaking of all education specifically in the image of the shiny Apple Store s total iconic user experience Never mind why it might be that the clerk at the Apple Store doesn t grade us on our device shopping skills or send us back to try again if we fail to demonstrate mastery of said skills And of course never wonder whether the analogy of the student as customer who is always right might be diabolically wrong The old saying Success has many fathers but Failure is an orphan is upended in the current discussion Our fall from grace our expulsion from some mythical educational paradise is attributed to many parents not to mention many parents among them helicopter parents and bulldozer parents yes they do exist I can t help thinking however that another answer may underlie all of those offered above perhaps so many of our students are so rude and inconsiderate precisely because they are so uninterested in an intellectual life Addressing that diabolical issue is

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/article/professor-say-hi-devil (2016-02-13)
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  • Scott Walker and Higher Education in the Media* | AAUP
    of the state the mission statement known as the Wisconsin Idea has been cherished by educators and graduates for a century So when Gov Scott Walker a second term Republican presented a budget this month proposing to delete some of its most soaring passages as well as to sharply cut state aid to the system he ignited a furious backlash that crossed party and regional lines In illustrating that backlash Bosman includes a pointed statement by the president of the student senate at the University of Wisconsin River Falls in effect deflecting any assertions that the criticism of Walker was coming largely from professors and college administrators Bosman then quotes Walker s facile attempt to recast the controversy as the result of an error in communication and without directly calling him duplicitous immediately identifies the political calculations that are driving these proposals Mr Walker hastily backtracked attributing the proposed changes which included inserting a call to meet the state s work force needs to a drafting error by aides But to many Wisconsinites it appeared that this was no mistake and that the governor who was re elected in November was intentionally sending a pugnacious message to an audience beyond the boundaries of his state the conservative caucus voters of neighboring Iowa the first stop in the presidential sweepstakes Without explicitly expressing judgment Bosman highlights the incongruity in the justifications offered by Walker for the reductions in state aid to higher education first that critics are greatly exaggerating the size and impact of the reductions and second that the reductions would give the institutions much greater fiscal autonomy Clearly both cannot be true Bosman quotes a Republican history professor at the University of Wisconsin Madison who suggests that Walker s proposals will absolutely savage the infrastructure and quality of teaching and research to this university The professor then adds What would be a shame for us in Wisconsin is if Scott leaves a wake of damage here on his way to the presidency It is worth emphasizing that he refers to the governor by his first name and with affection nonetheless he asserts that Walker is putting his personal political ambitions ahead of the public interest of his state More important than such judicious selection and use of detail is Bosman s illustration of the impact of the reductions in state funding on the professional lives of several individual faculty members at the University of Wisconsin s flagship campus and on the university s ability to continue to attract and to keep top faculty She undercuts the argument that the universities have accumulated considerable cash reserves on which they can draw if they don t wish to initiate the fiscal measures necessary to accommodate the reductions in state support pointing out that such reserves simply do not exist at many of the regional campuses and that the reserves have never been intended to cover politically driven reductions Indeed the most memorable detail in Bosman s article is a statement made by a clearly partisan government worker in Madison Walker doesn t value the university He has disdain for anything intellectual He doesn t care if the populace is educated That statement is so straightforward that it would be difficult to counter with the usual talking points It reminds the reader that Walker was a college dropout but it is much more than a snide reference to someone who is the governor of a dynamic state and who had serious presidential ambitions It could force many who would prefer to rely on the usual talking points to recognize that in defending Walker s disdain for education they are revealing their own Writing for the September 2 2015 Chronicle of Higher Education Eric Kelderman explores Where Scott Walker Got His Utilitarian View of Higher Education and Why It Matters Kelderman s article opens by linking Walker s attitudes toward higher education directly to his truncated university education In the spring of 1990 Scott Walker then a senior at Marquette University decided to leave college before finishing his degree A job in finance had opened up at the American Red Cross in Milwaukee and Mr Walker leapt at the opportunity Certainly I wanted an education for more than a job he has since said but my primary purpose was to get a job It s impossible not to consider that statement when regarding the governor s recent gambits in higher education policy Most of Kelderman s article focuses on Walker s far right ideology He notes that Walker s presidential ambitions have almost certainly influenced the timing of his attacks on higher education and he observes that although Walker has been one of the strongest proponents of a utilitarian view of higher education among the candidates for the GOP nomination his views are broadly shared among those candidates Kelderman quotes Peter A Lawler described as a conservative scholar at Berry College who says the governor s treatment of higher education as a career preparation service is a bipartisan problem based on the exaggerated ideas that colleges are inefficient and that the liberal arts are not valuable on the job market Lawler notes that the Department of Education is also attacking the personal element of education Kelderman suggests that Walker s actions and strategies have been modeled closely on those of the political figure he has openly idolized Ronald Reagan juxtaposing illustrative statements by both men In 1967 Reagan who was then governor of California rationalized budget cuts in higher education by saying that taxpayers shouldn t be subsidizing intellectual curiosity Governor Walker has suggested that maybe it s time for faculty and staff to start thinking about teaching more classes and doing more work Kelderman quotes Jay Heck executive director of Common Cause in Wisconsin who cites Walker s remarks about faculty members not working hard enough as a familiar trope to garner support from conservatives I think he s interested in higher education from an ideological aspect cutting tenure making life miserable

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/article/scott-walker-and-higher-education-media (2016-02-13)
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