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  • College and University Government: Lindenwood College | AAUP
    Sexual Diversity Gender Identity Teaching Evaluation Tenure Women in Higher Education Reports Publications AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home AAUP Policies Reports Academic Freedom and Tenure Investigative Reports College and University Governance Reports Standing Committee and Subcommittee Reports Audit Reports View All Reports Back to Reports and Publications AAUP Redbook The eleventh edition of the Redbook contains foundational AAUP policy documents as well as reports on new issues in higher education Buy yours now College and University Government Lindenwood College Download Lindenwood College pdf The investigating committee concludes that current conditions for academic governance are truly deplorable Only in the matter of detailed course content has the Lindenwood College faculty retained its traditional role If there is any other aspect of faculty involvement touched on in the Statement on Government where faculty members at Lindenwood College have anything more than a token role this investigating committee has failed to detect it The text of this report was written by the members of the investigating committee In accordance with Association practice the text was then edited by the Association s staff and as revised with the concurrence of the investigating committee was submitted to Committee T on College and University Government With the approval of Committee T it was subsequently sent to the administration of Lindenwood College to the chair of the board of trustees to the AAUP chapter and to other persons concerned in the report In the light of the responses received

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/college-and-university-government-lindenwood-college (2016-02-13)
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  • College and University Government: Elmira College | AAUP
    Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home AAUP Policies Reports Academic Freedom and Tenure Investigative Reports College and University Governance Reports Standing Committee and Subcommittee Reports Audit Reports View All Reports Back to Reports and Publications AAUP Redbook The eleventh edition of the Redbook contains foundational AAUP policy documents as well as reports on new issues in higher education Buy yours now College and University Government Elmira College Download Elmira College pdf This report deals primarily with conditions of academic government at Elmira College particularly relations among the faculty the chief academic officers and the governing board It deals with a welter of episodes that have contributed to a situation without an obvious beginning middle or end In assessing patterns of governance which penetrate and are reflected in all aspects of institutional life the investigating committee sought more to depict the tone and implications of what will be seen as very poor governance relationships at Elmira College over the past few years than to describe individual episodes and developments in great detail The text of this report was written by the members of the investigating committee In accordance with Association practice the text was then edited by the Association s staff and as revised with the concurrence of the investigating committee was submitted to Committee T on College and University Government With the approval of Committee T it was subsequently sent 0 the administration of Elmira College to the chair of the board of trustees to the AAUP

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/college-and-university-government-elmira-college (2016-02-13)
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  • College and University Government: Miami-Dade Community College | AAUP
    of Rights Minority Serving Institutions Post Tenure Review Retirement Sexual Diversity Gender Identity Teaching Evaluation Tenure Women in Higher Education Reports Publications AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home AAUP Policies Reports Academic Freedom and Tenure Investigative Reports College and University Governance Reports Standing Committee and Subcommittee Reports Audit Reports View All Reports Back to Reports and Publications AAUP Redbook The eleventh edition of the Redbook contains foundational AAUP policy documents as well as reports on new issues in higher education Buy yours now College and University Government Miami Dade Community College Download Miami Dade Community College pdf This report was published in the May June 2000 issue of Academe This report concerns the action taken by the administration of Miami Dade Community College to abolish the existing system of academic government at the institution following a faculty vote in favor of collective bargaining

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/college-and-university-government-miami-dade-community-college (2016-02-13)
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  • College and University Government: Antioch University and the Closing of Antioch College | AAUP
    the effects of this proposed budget and our ability to work within its constraints We remain committed to public discussion of these issues and to a thoughtful process by which Antioch s time honored traditions of self governance continue to guide the college budget staffing and curriculum 7 By the beginning of this decade Antioch College s system of shared governance had become limited to reacting to decisions made at the university level by the board and the chancellor V Issues of Concern Summarized here are what appear to the investigating committee to be the central issues raised by the actions taken concerning Antioch College and its faculty by the administration and the board of Antioch University A Fundamental Responsibility for the Curriculum According to the Statement on Government of Colleges and Universities the Association s foundational document on academic governance the faculty has primary responsibility for such fundamental areas as curriculum and subject matter and methods of instruction In October 2003 a board appointed Sesquicentennial Commission for the Renewal of Antioch College was charged with outlining a sustainable vision for that renewal The renewal commission s report presented to the board at its June 2004 meeting called for a radical transformation of the college s curriculum to commence in fall 2006 Central to the new curriculum was the creation of experiential learning communities organized around a single theme and taught collaboratively by two or three faculty members from relevant disciplines In January 2005 the college s faculty was informed that the new curriculum would begin in fall 2005 a year earlier than originally scheduled Faculty members interviewed by this investigating committee stated that the curriculum was imposed on them without adequate consultation that they never voted to approve it and that they had no role in determining its commencement date The thirteen member renewal commission co chaired by the chancellor and the chair of the board included only two faculty members neither of whom according to faculty members with whom the investigating committee spoke represented the faculty on the commission in any formal or substantive manner According to a professor who had requested more faculty representation on the renewal commission a university administrator told him that more faculty would have too conservative an impact on the thinking of the group Until midway through the process members of the commission including the dean and the president of the college were not permitted to discuss the commission s work with the Antioch faculty members who would be responsible for implementing the curricular changes The university administration promised the college community that it would be brought into the shaping of the renewal plan when the commission was closer to completing its work Until February 2004 communication with the college s faculty for the most part had to do with additional appointments to the commission and the commission s projected timetable for presenting its recommendations Most members of the faculty were unaware that a curricular overhaul was part of the commission s work and the investigating committee was told that many faculty members were shocked when that overhaul was announced at a meeting in February 2004 Before that meeting the board had already endorsed the initial work and the stated vision of the commission including a curriculum based on experiential learning communities 8 The commission had not been mandated to focus on the college s curriculum and according to a member of the commission the curriculum turned out to be the path of least resistance given the chairs prohibition on addressing governance and finances 9 Faculty members interviewed by the investigating committee were perplexed by the focus on the curriculum because in a recent review for reaccreditation the visiting team had found fault with governance but not with the curriculum During March and April 2004 a series of sessions to which particular faculty members and students were invited focused on formulating a workable design for the curriculum in order to make the commission s prescriptions viable 10 Each time faculty members raised concerns about the financial viability of the renewal plan they were assured of the board s long term commitment to a new plan At these meetings concerned faculty members asked fundamental questions such as Who owns the curriculum and By what processes will curricular staffing and hiring decisions be made They questioned the potential impact of the renewal plan on continuing employment of the current faculty and asked whether the board would guarantee the provision of adequate long term financial support for the plan s implementation The faculty received assurances that they would have five years to make the transition fully to the new plan during which time the plan would have the board s unqualified support including financial support According to a former president this promise was rhetorical because the money was not there to support a major college project such as the new curriculum The commission s report approved by the board at its June 2004 meeting included a new curriculum and the benchmarks for implementation on which some members of the college community had worked The sentiments of faculty members with whom the investigating committee spoke can be summed up in the words of one professor who said I was appalled at the process by which the new curriculum had been drafted and by which it was being presented I was also deeply frustrated by being subjected to this process The faculty responded to the renewal commission s plan and to the absence of faculty involvement in its formulation in three ways Some faculty members left the college Some who remained worked energetically to create design and implement the learning communities which were to be the core of the new curriculum A former president described the effort of the faculty in this regard as noble A third faculty reaction during the 2004 05 academic year was the development of a new college governance body a faculty senate in the hope of strengthening faculty participation The proposal calling for its creation stated that Antioch College is currently undergoing fundamental change that dramatically impacts faculty the curriculum is being transformed classroom and co op delivery systems are being altered and our departmental structure is being closely examined These changes require updated and transformed faculty structures The proposed establishment of a faculty senate was intended to restore faculty oversight to those matters that either most draw upon faculty expertise the curriculum or those that most directly affect their lives faculty personnel issues There is a collective sense of progressive disempowerment among the faculty with regard to these two issues The proposed changes in faculty governance seek merely to reassert the faculty s right to oversee those matters that have historically been under faculty purview The faculty approved the proposal in April 2005 Thus in addition to AdCil the college now had a faculty senate through which institutional governance could potentially be shared In September 2005 implementation of the first element of the renewal plan s curriculum began Enrollments for the entering class under the plan steadily declined over the course of the 2005 06 academic year however falling from a high of sixty three students in the fall to thirty students by the end of the spring term An October 2005 university announcement inviting applications for the chancellor s position confirmed that enrollments had declined because the curriculum was instituted before it was complete since only the first year of the Renewal Plan had been prepared and many materials were not available for the full cycle of 2004 05 admissions recruiting the entering class in the fall 2005 is very small 11 The Association s Statement on Government and its derivative The Role of the Faculty in Budgetary and Salary Matters emphasize the need for accessibility of important financial information to those groups with a legitimate interest in it and the participation by each group appropriate to the particular expertise of each Such a radical change in the curriculum as had been undertaken at Antioch College was risky to put it mildly The rationale for making a dramatic change in the curriculum was subsequently characterized in terms of its purported value to the implementation of a capital campaign to the reduction in the high faculty to student ratio and to the salvation of the college Fundamentally it appears to the investigating committee the impetus for the new curriculum was financial One member of the commission recalled that midway through that body s work the university administration decided that incremental change would not be sufficient to address the financial problems of the college Rather dramatic change was needed The investigating committee finds that the Antioch College faculty far from having a primary role in the development of the new curriculum as called for under the Statement on Government was charged primarily with implementing a new focus for undergraduate education being imposed on the college by the board The committee finds further that the board acted to have the faculty implement a new curriculum without having consulted with the faculty regarding the reasons why it thought a new focus was needed and without including the faculty in considering possible alternative approaches to the college s financial problems It is just at these moments when dramatic steps that could change the character of the institution are seen as necessary that full and open discussion is essential The faculty would have to see the risky decision through and its close involvement should have been considered crucial not only in understanding the financial situation but also in planning for possible solutions 12 B Faculty Involvement in the Decisions to Declare Financial Exigency and Suspend College Operations The widely accepted standards of academic governance articulated in the Statement on Government of Colleges and Universities which rests on the premise of an inescapable interdependence among governing board administration faculty and others calls for adequate communication among these components and full opportunity for appropriate joint planning and effort With regard to the internal operations of the institution the document further provides that e ffective planning demands that the broadest possible exchange of information and opinion should be the rule for communication among the components of a college and that the faculty should be fully informed on all budgetary matters The Association s derivative The Role of the Faculty in Budgetary and Salary Matters states At institutions experiencing major threats to their continued financial support the faculty should be informed as early and as specifically as possible of significant impending financial difficulties The faculty should participate at the department college or professional school and institution wide levels in key decisions as to the future of the institution and of specific academic programs within the institution The faculty should play a fundamental role in any decision that would change the basic character and purpose of the institution including transformation of the institution affiliation of part of the existing operation with another institution or merger with the resulting abandonment or curtailment of duplicate programs When the Antioch University trustees resolved on June 7 2007 to declare financial exigency and then on June 9 to suspend Antioch College operations they took actions of far reaching consequences not only for the whole Antioch community and particularly for its faculty members staff and students but also for the national academic community many of whose members saw in the college s historic commitment to progressive education and social justice an example of liberal education at its best Representatives of the faculty at the college immediately charged that the board had taken these critical actions without advance notice or consultation with them and in contradiction of previous board assurances that the college would remain open for five years following the implementation of a new board mandated curriculum initiated in fall 2005 13 Subsequently former administrators and prominent alumni including potential significant donors among the latter also alleged a lack of consultation regarding both the college s precarious financial condition prior to the June 7 declaration of financial exigency and the process by which university administrators and board members had reached the decision Thus the key issue of whether the college faculty was afforded an opportunity to take part in the decision making process was raised from the very beginning and became the basis around which vocal opposition to the planned suspension coalesced among members of the college faculty and staff students and alumni in the days immediately after the announcements Following the institution of the new curriculum university officials turned their attention in 2007 to the state of the university s governance structure In January 2007 the ULC met with consultant Richard T Ingram president emeritus of the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges to discuss the university s governance structure 14 According to his revised May 2007 report A Proposed Governing Structure for Antioch University a draft of which he had first submitted to the board in February of that year the goal of the meeting was to facilitate a wide ranging discussion of Antioch University s governance and related financial academic and management challenges and to recommend a structure befitting a multi campus private university Two of the report s most salient recommendations were that t here should be an Antioch University Yellow Springs with an undergraduate school named Antioch College and a graduate school named The McGregor School of Graduate Studies It Antioch College should have its own Board of Trustees There is no record of the Ingram report having been made available to the college faculty The creation of a separate board dedicated only to the college that would focus on the issues the college faced including improved facilities raising funds and building back the trust and financial support of the alumni had been raised repeatedly by the college s faculty and presidents and rejected by the existing board Not sharing the May 2007 report with the faculty was a significant omission according to former president Devine because the report s recommendations would have provided considerable support to those faculty members already convinced that a separate board for the college would be a solution to the college s governance and financial problems Shortly after President Steven Lawry assumed office in January 2006 he was asked but declined to sign a legal document prepared by the university counsel and approved by the board s executive committee stating that his suggesting to anyone the idea of a separate board for the college would be grounds for his dismissal In March 2007 another board commissioned report on the financial condition and continuing viability of Antioch College prepared by Gateway Group consultants Thomas Chema and Lisa Thibodeau former president and chief financial officer respectively of Hiram College was presented to the trustees The report suggested three choices with regard to the college s future The first option was to attempt to turn around Antioch College by instituting significant expense reductions among them combining units of the university which could achieve significant savings and reducing or eliminating the college s contribution to the faculty and staff retirement plan The second choice was to fold the college into Antioch McGregor which appeared to be operating successfully and has an existing administrative structure The third possibility was suspending the college s operation at the conclusion of academic year 2007 08 The seven page report followed from the authors review of several years worth of university financial records and a discussion with the university s chief financial officer of the ramifications of the university s financial situation It concluded that the college was in a state of financial exigency that the university system s current cash flow forecast shows the system running negative by May 2009 and that management s proposed suspension of operations plan is more likely to be successful in preserving the viability of the university as a whole and providing an opportunity to reinvent the college than other alternatives The report was not shared with the faculty While discussions regarding the college s financial situation were being conducted at the university level during early 2007 with little if any consultation with the faculty the college s AdCil continued to meet regularly during fall 2006 and winter 2007 Discussions of budget data at these meetings according to faculty members who served on AdCil at the time were unusually brief with college administrators distributing copies of the budget at the meetings for council members immediate review and collecting those copies at the end of the meeting Detailed financial information was no longer reaching the Antioch College faculty and financial reports if they occurred at all were limited to short presentations of numbers not subject to alteration Sometime beginning in March 2007 moreover most AdCil meetings were canceled even as university administrators and consultants were actively considering the future of the college and of the university as a whole AdCil meeting minutes from fall and winter 2006 07 were quite brief compared with those from the previous academic year One faculty leader who served on the senate steering committee and as the senate s first chair reported to AAUP staff regarding senate participation in the decision to suspend college operations that w hile I served on the Steering Committee of the Faculty Senate there was no consultation of any kind regarding suspension of college operations In fact there was no mention that the possibility was on the table Both AdCil and President Lawry were focused on the latter s plan to improve the college s financial situation merging the college and Antioch McGregor and advocating for a separate governing board for the college Prior to the board s regularly scheduled June 2007 meeting the trustees received a May 31 internally prepared ULC plan setting forth the university administration s position with regard to the financial sustainability of Antioch College and proposing two scenarios for its future status It is now apparent the report began that the enrollment and finances of the College are not sufficient for the College to sustain current operations The University management team has reviewed the finances of the College and has determined that the survival of the College and perhaps even the University is increasingly at risk due to the depletion of funds if the College remains open and operating at a deficit Cash flow predictions indicate that Antioch University will not be able to meet monthly payroll obligations to faculty staff and creditors sometime in late 2008 with a margin of error of thirty days without suspending operations at Antioch College Therefore it is the recommendation of Antioch University management that the College declare financial exigency in June 2007 and operations be suspended on or around June 30 2008 With regard to the two scenarios the first detailed plans for permanent closure of the college and the second proposed to suspend operations of Antioch College for a fixed period three years with a design process in place to reopen it as a state of the art twenty first century residential undergraduate program within a comprehensive Antioch University Yellow Springs campus and a dynamic multi campus national university The board resolution to suspend the college s operation which ultimately followed from its June 7 meeting called for the suspension of college operations for no longer than four years one year longer than what was recommended in the May ULC plan The decision to close the college came less than halfway into the five year period the university administration and board had promised the Antioch College faculty to realize the results of the administratively mandated new curriculum The investigating committee finds that the determination about the college s state of financial exigency and the decision on suspending operations were unquestionably reached without faculty participation President Lawry acknowledged in a letter to the faculty dated June 18 2007 that the Faculty Personnel Policies and Procedures of Antioch College mandated consultation with AdCil to prepare a plan and timetable for abating the financial exigency and he indicated his intent to meet that mandate Nevertheless consultation with the faculty once again did not occur By July 26 2007 Chancellor Murdock had received a letter of resignation from President Lawry and named an interim replacement Andrzej Bloch with according to the AdCil minutes full executive power as COO chief operating officer CAO chief academic officer The minutes also indicate that the chancellor had recognized that this change in college leadership was made without consultation with AdCil or any other governing body of the college and she cited the Board s announcement of suspension of operations as justification for circumventing the faculty s role The minutes further indicate that AdCil members discussed the implications of circumventing shared governance and questioned the chancellor about the issue The replies recorded lack any commitment to reestablishing shared governance Instead the chancellor stated to AdCil members I don t know how we will gain trust and I wonder whether we can ever work together again The minutes of this AdCil meeting also have Chancellor Murdock reporting that at the time of the decision to suspend operations we are looking at a March 2008 bankruptcy of the entire university The declaration of financial exigency however was limited to the college As events unfolded Interim President Bloch did not carry out the commitment expressed by his predecessor Instead of consulting with the faculty as mandated to prepare a plan and timetable for abating the financial exigency he issued letters to the faculty on November 9 2007 reiterating that the declaration of financial exigency stood and that notices of termination remained in force and effect Regulation 4c of the Association s Recommended Institutional Regulations on Academic Freedom and Tenure states that i f the administration issues notice to a particular faculty member of an intention to terminate the appointment because of financial exigency the faculty member will have the right to a full hearing before a faculty committee The hearing need not conform in all respects with a proceeding conducted pursuant to Regulation 5 dismissal for cause but the essentials of an on the record adjudicative hearing will be observed The issues in this hearing may include i The existence and extent of the condition of financial exigency The burden will rest on the administration to prove the existence and extent of the condition Since no hearings were held Antioch College faculty members were denied the opportunity to examine or challenge the decisions to declare financial exigency and to invoke the most drastic abatement approach by ceasing operations of the college The issue of adequate consultation with the faculty regarding the closing or sale of a major component of a university or college should include consideration of the precedents examined in a previous investigation addressed in a 1970 Association report College and University Government Long Island University which is relevant to the present matter 15 In that case the investigating committee questioned the intent of the trustees to exercise unilaterally their legal right to dispose of a university campus the Brooklyn Center the institution s original core notwithstanding its inevitably profound effect on the entire academic community It should be asked the report queried whether a majority of the Board of Trustees can effectuate plans for educational buildings and the teaching and learning therein without consultation with the faculty the body which possesses primary responsibility for the academic program Can these controlling Trustees in fact sell one part of a university and use the resulting dollars for the development of those parts which remain without hearing from the members of the faculty Can they rest on the position that the Trustees are charged by law with these responsibilities and rights and that they have within themselves the competence to take such action This investigating committee concurs in the finding of the Long Island University investigating committee that t hese questions must under accepted academic standards be answered strongly in the negative The spirit of the finding seems directly applicable to the current investigation perhaps even more so in the Antioch case where the entire college faculty has suffered termination of appointment than in the Long Island University case where had the trustees been allowed to go through with the closing the tenured members of the faculty would have had the opportunity to transfer to another LIU campus 16 The committee observes that in the case of a reopened Antioch College its administration should observe the spirit of the AAUP s Regulation 4c 6 on the reinstatement of faculty members terminated for reasons of financial exigency lest the closure and reopening have the appearance of simply seeking to eliminate tenure The closure of Antioch College raises broader issues involving the responsibilities of trustees The basic fiduciary responsibility of trustees is commonly recognized but in the case of an organization created to oversee the operation of an educational establishment is it not reasonable to expect the trustees to have responsibilities beyond avoiding financial bankruptcy It seems to the investigating committee not at all unreasonable to have expected the trustees to pursue the goal the operation of Antioch College for which the enterprise had been established The 1980 Antioch University Articles of Incorporation state this purpose explicitly Article II Purpose The objects of the said corporation are to possess and carry on at Yellow Springs Greene County Ohio and at such other places as the Board of Trustees may determine a College or educational establishment where instruction in every branch of useful learning may be given Because this statement of purpose predates the establishment of Antioch McGregor it refers to possessing and carrying on Antioch College as the primary purpose that could be augmented but not replaced by carrying on with other establishments Unfortunately the trustees and the administration of Antioch University seem to have lost sight of this purpose C The Declaration of Financial Exigency at Antioch College The 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure provides for the termination of continuous faculty appointments under extraordinary circumstances because of a demonstrably bona fide condition of financial exigency Regulation 4c 1 of the Association s derivative Recommended Institutional Regulations defines financial exigency as an imminent financial crisis that threatens the survival of the institution as a whole and that cannot be alleviated by less drastic means than the termination of continuing faculty appointments The regulation calls upon an institution to pursue all feasible alternatives to terminating faculty appointments This provision raises two questions 1 was there an imminent financial crisis that affected the survival of the institution as a whole and 2 were there feasible alternatives to terminating all faculty appointments and closing the college and if so did the university administration consider them There can be little doubt that Antioch College s financial problems were in no small measure a product of managerial decisions made without faculty consultation including a curricular experiment that was connected to a decline in enrollment and a decision to reduce financial support to the college from the university As explained earlier in this report after the new curriculum was implemented enrollment at the college fell dramatically The university administration and the board of trustees asserted that the college had survived in recent years only by receiving subsidies from the five nonresidential campuses of Antioch University They claimed that the university could no longer both subsidize the college and remain competitive in local markets The support the college received from the other units had been negotiated and set was relied upon by the college and could not be easily replaced In declaring financial exigency for the college the board of trustees asserted that the college s crisis was causing a crisis at the university necessitating the suspension of college operations A member of the board of trustees stated in an e mail to an AAUP staff member that although the issue of saving the college versus saving the university was raised at the executive committee meeting as a potential subject of board discussion Chancellor Murdock would not allow the discussion to occur In fact the wording of the Gateway report indicates that the administration had expressed its desire at the outset to declare financial exigency and close the college The investigating committee examined three measures of the university s financial health using data from the university s IRS 990 forms and the audited financial statements from 2003 to 2008 the budget surplus or deficit the cash flow position and a composite index developed by the Ohio State Board of Regents based on ratios used to assess the creditworthiness of an institution Although none of these measures is indicative of a financially strong Antioch University the investigating committee finds that the data examined do not support a conclusion that the entire university was in imminent financial crisis or that the university at least for the immediate future could not have absorbed the college s financial crisis Not only were alternatives to the declaration of financial exigency not explored but after the board did decide to declare financial exigency at the college there was also no opportunity for the community to consider alternatives to suspending operations at the college The investigating committee was able to identify a variety of suggestions that had been made before the declaration of financial exigency by for example the Gateway Commission and past presidents of the college that appear not to have been explored Among these suggestions were salary and benefit concessions from the college faculty and staff a larger payout of endowment income an appeal to alumni prior to the declaration of financial exigency the sale of certain assets including the license of the college s public radio station merging the college and Antioch McGregor and creating a separate board of trustees for the college the absence of which was identified as a deterrent to alumni giving and streamlining the university administration The alumni when they learned of the college s closing proposed purchasing the college As of the writing of this report agreement has been reached for the alumni to purchase and reopen the college under its own governing board Had the alumni known earlier of the severity of the financial crisis and further of the board s plan to close the college they might have been able to work with the board to formulate a mutually acceptable resolution to the crisis without resorting to suspension of operations It may well be that a series of years like the 2007 08 academic year with the college remaining open would have ultimately led to the closing of the entire university There is little evidence however that any alternatives to closing the college were given serious consideration D Denial of Emeritus Status All members of the Antioch College faculty received notice of termination of their appointments effective in summer 2008 Faculty members who had worked for the college for many years knew that this would be their last academic position On March 11 2008 Interim President Andrzej Bloch solicited requests for emeritus status summarizing the criteria in the faculty personnel policies the candidate 1 has completed at least ten 10 years of service to the College 2 is at least 60 years of age and 3 has attained the rank of associate or professor or equivalent At least two of the professors who requested emeritus status were not favorably recommended to the board by that body s joint academic affairs and finance committees even though both had fulfilled the criteria enumerated by President Bloch Each professor had been at Antioch College for more than thirty years One had served as the college s president the other professor had in 2005 negotiated retirement commencing January 2009 In the letter communicating the decision of the joint committees which had considered five candidates for emeritus status Chancellor Murdock stated that the primary consideration for award of Emeritus is outstanding contribution to the institution in the areas of academic achievement scholarship teaching and service Those candidates who were not recommended to the board were recognized as having excelled in a sustained way in the areas of service and teaching however there was no evidence of scholarly activity in many years or the overall results of scholarly work were far below expectations set by the policy for the award of the title Professor Emeritus Since scholarly activity is a prime consideration for the award of the honor of Emeritus your name was not recommended by the joint committees to the Board The two professors denied emeritus status with whom the investigating committee spoke were not aware of the criteria stated by Chancellor Murdock They were surprised to learn that the finance committee of the board was involved in the decision since virtually no financial obligations were involved in the decision to confer emeritus status and historically the finance committee had not been involved The professors were never asked to provide supporting material regarding their scholarship or professional activity and therefore questioned the evidence on which the decisions were made Finally while the status of the Antioch College Faculty Personnel Policy in relation to a draft of a university policy on emeritus status is not clear to the investigating committee even the February 2 2007 draft of the university policy does not specify scholarly activity as the primary consideration If a new policy succeeded the old policy no faculty member with whom the investigating committee spoke was aware of any distributed announcements of changes in criteria developed by the board In fact there seems as late as June 2008 to be some confusion at the board level about criteria as evidenced by a description of the academic affairs committee meeting where faculty members requests for emeritus status had been discussed The investigating committee sees the criteria outlined by President Bloch as reflecting those criteria normally used by boards to reward emeritus status to professors whose scholarship teaching and service had already been evaluated as they moved through the ranks over their years at an institution These evaluations are made primarily by those most capable the faculty Members of the board are not the appropriate persons to assess the scholarship of faculty members If the university board did decide to use achievement in scholarship as a criterion for emeritus status it should have developed with the faculty a procedure by which scholarship would be evaluated by those qualified to do so The investigating committee finds that the two faculty members both full professors with more than three decades of service to Antioch College were denied emeritus status based on criteria previously unknown to them and applied without supporting evidence by persons namely members of the board not in an appropriate position to make such judgments E The Future of Antioch University and Antioch College Questions of faculty governance and academic due process will undoubtedly remain of paramount importance to Antioch College s former faculty and will be critical for the future of Antioch University as a whole and for Antioch College if as now planned it reopens as an institution independent of Antioch University 17 With Antioch College the only part of the university in which a tenure system was in place issues of faculty governance will continue to be a concern for the remainder of the university as well as a concern for a reopened college Currently Antioch University is more like a university system than a single college or university Each campus sets its own tuition with approval from the university s board of trustees and its own salary scale and some fringe benefits excluding retirement plans and health care coverage common to all Each campus currently has its own faculty handbook although as a result presumably of the recommendations of the Blue Book Commission efforts appear to be under way to standardize faculty policies across the university 18 Faculty appointments are made and evaluations are conducted through separate sets of procedures developed at each campus and degrees programs and curricula are also determined on a campus by campus basis Similarly each campus appears to formulate

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/AAUP/programs/academicfreedom/investrep/2009/antioch/ (2016-02-13)
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  • College and University Governance: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute | AAUP
    in Higher Education Reports Publications AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home AAUP Policies Reports Academic Freedom and Tenure Investigative Reports College and University Governance Reports Standing Committee and Subcommittee Reports Audit Reports View All Reports Back to Reports and Publications AAUP Redbook The eleventh edition of the Redbook contains foundational AAUP policy documents as well as reports on new issues in higher education Buy yours now College and University Governance Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Download RPI pdf This report was published in the 2011 issue of the Bulletin of the AAUP This report concerns the action taken in summer 2007 by the board of trustees and the administration of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute to suspend the faculty senate and replace it with a transitional structure of faculty governance The board and administration stated that they took this step because the senate had declined to follow a board directive to amend its constitution to exclude all but the tenured and tenure track faculty from the senate s constituency and membership In issuing its directive in December 2006 the board was reacting to a senate proposal to grant the clinical faculty the right to participate as voting members in the senate After outlining the history of the faculty s conflict with the administration and governing board both before and after the suspension of the faculty senate the report analyzes the administration s rationale for suspending the senate and the ways in which its substitute for faculty governance

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/college-and-university-governance-rensselaer-polytechnic-institute (2016-02-13)
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  • College and University Governance: Idaho State University | AAUP
    Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home AAUP Policies Reports Academic Freedom and Tenure Investigative Reports College and University Governance Reports Standing Committee and Subcommittee Reports Audit Reports View All Reports Back to Reports and Publications AAUP Redbook The eleventh edition of the Redbook contains foundational AAUP policy documents as well as reports on new issues in higher education Buy yours now College and University Governance Idaho State University Download IdahoState pdf This report was published in the 2011 issue of the Bulletin of the AAUP This report prepared by the Association s staff concerns the decision made on February 17 2011 by the Idaho State Board of Education to suspend the operation and bylaws of the faculty senate at Idaho State University and to direct ISU president Arthur C Vailas to implement an interim faculty advisory structure The board acted on the recommendation of the president one

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/college-and-university-governance-idaho-state-university (2016-02-13)
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  • AAUP Contingent Faculty Index 2006 | AAUP
    Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home AAUP Contingent Faculty Index 2006 In the AAUP Contingent Faculty Index 2006 the American Association of University Professors provides data to document the increasing predominance of non tenure track faculty in America s colleges and universities This report draws on figures submitted by institutions to the US Department of Education s IPEDS database for fall 2005 and makes data on individual campuses easily accessible for the first time The Index is divided into three sections An article Consequences An Increasingly Contingent Faculty by John W Curtis and Monica F Jacobe details the working situations contingent faculty face under various employment conditions and the consequences for the quality of higher education of an increasingly contingent faculty Aggregate tables grouped with the article and linked above provide a breakdown on the use of both full and part time faculty by

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/aaup-contingent-faculty-index-2006 (2016-02-13)
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  • Academic Freedom and Employee Speech | AAUP
    advanced in AAUP s amicus brief the court emphasized the seminal importance of academic speech Accordingly the court concluded that the Garcetti analysis did not apply to speech related to scholarship or teaching and therefore the First Amendment could protect this speech even when undertaken pursuant to the official duties of a teacher and professor Read more about Demers v Austin 746 F 3d 402 9th Cir Wash Jan 29 2014 Capeheart v Terrell 695 F 3d 681 7th Cir 2012 Professor Capeheart sued Northeastern Illinois University after the provost disregarded a faculty vote electing Capeheart chair of the Justice Studies Department Read more about Capeheart v Terrell 695 F 3d 681 7th Cir 2012 Adams v University of North Carolina Wilmington 640 F 3d 550 4th Cir 2011 Tenured Professor Michael Adams sued the University of North Carolina Wilmington after he was denied a promotion alleging this denial was retaliation for his political speech and his speech criticizing the school The AAUP the Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression and the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education filed an amicus brief in the Fourth Circuit supporting Professor Adams Read more about Adams v University of North Carolina Wilmington 640 F 3d 550 4th Cir 2011 Sadid v Idaho State University 265 P 3d 1144 Idaho 2011 motion to stay denied Sadid v Idaho State Univ 2012 U S Dist LEXIS 32985 D Idaho Mar 12 2012 Professor Sadid alleged that Idaho State University retaliated against him because of his comments criticizing the administration that had been published in a local newspaper over several years Read more about Sadid v Idaho State University 265 P 3d 1144 Idaho 2011 motion to stay denied Sadid v Idaho State Univ 2012 U S Dist LEXIS 32985 D Idaho Mar 12 2012 Ward Churchill v University of Colorado at Boulder 293 P 3d16 61 App 2010 aff d 285 P 3d 986 Col 2012 In a jury trial in the Colorado District Court in Denver a jury found that Churchill s protected speech his controversial writings about September 11 was a substantial or motivating factor for the Board of Regents decision to discharge him from his tenured position The district judge overturned the jury s verdict and ruled in favor of the Regents as a matter of law On February 18 2010 the AAUP joined the ACLU and the National Coalition Against Censorship in filing an amicus brief in support of the appeal by Professor Ward Churchill to the Colorado State Court of Appeals Read more about Ward Churchill v University of Colorado at Boulder 293 P 3d16 61 App 2010 aff d 285 P 3d 986 Col 2012 Hong v Grant 403 Fed Appx 236 9th Cir 2010 Juan Hong a tenured professor at University of California Irvine criticized a number of decisions about hiring promotions and staffing at the school of engineering and was later denied a merit raise The Ninth Circuit Court affirmed a federal district court

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/our-work/legal-program/amicus-briefs/academic-freedom-employee-speech (2016-02-13)
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