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  • Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York, Case No. 2-RC-22358 (Feb. 11, 2002 ); Brown University, Case No. 1-RC-21368 (Nov. 16, 2001) | AAUP
    AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York Case No 2 RC 22358 Feb 11 2002 Brown University Case No 1 RC 21368 Nov 16 2001 The National Labor Relations Board NLRB granted review in these two cases which raise the issue again about whether graduate students are employees under the National Labor Relations Act NLRA In Brown University and Columbia University the administrations contend that the unionization of graduate students who are employees violates the academic freedom of institutions In May 2002 the AAUP filed an amicus brief in support of the graduate assistants arguing that the Board correctly decided in New York University that collective bargaining does not violate the academic freedom of universities The AAUP argues in its amicus brief that 1 the First Amendment does not immunize universities from the NLRA 2 national AAUP policies on faculty and graduate student unionization and local AAUP faculty bargaining experience demonstrate that unionization is consistent with academic freedom 3 graduate assistant unionization does not violate academic freedom or harm faculty student mentoring relationships and 4 state courts have found collective bargaining by student employees compatible with academic freedom In the brief the Association further contends that teaching as an academic requirement for graduate assistants should not on its own preclude finding that graduate assistants are employees Read the brief pdf Status On July 13 2004 the National Labor Relations Board issued its decision in Brown University The Board ruled in a 3 2 decision that graduate assistants are not employees under the National Labor Relations Act thereby overruling New York

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/brief/trustees-columbia-university-city-new-york-case-no-2-rc-22358-feb-11-2002-brown-university (2016-02-13)
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  • Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, Case No. 4-RC-20353 (Nov. 21, 2002) | AAUP
    Women in Higher Education Reports Publications AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania Case No 4 RC 20353 Nov 21 2002 On May 14 2003 the National Labor Relations Board NLRB granted review in this case which raises the issue once again about whether graduate students are employees under the National Labor Relations Act NLRA In that review the Board may revisit its decision in New York University 332 N L R B No 111 2000 in which the AAUP filed an amicus brief In New York University the Board held that certain graduate assistants at NYU were employees under the Act and therefore could choose to unionize In University of Pennsylvania the administration contends that the unionization of graduate students who are employees violates the academic freedom of institutions On May 27 2003 the AAUP filed an amicus brief in support of the graduate assistants arguing that the Board decision in New York University which found that collective bargaining does not violate the academic freedom of universities was well reasoned and should not be revisited The AAUP argues in its amicus brief that 1 the First Amendment does not immunize universities from the NLRA 2 national AAUP policies on faculty and graduate student unionization and local AAUP faculty bargaining experience demonstrate that unionization is consistent with academic freedom 3 graduate assistant unionization does not harm faculty student mentoring relationships and 4 institutional academic freedom concerns are best

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/brief/trustees-university-pennsylvania-case-no-4-rc-20353-nov-21-2002 (2016-02-13)
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  • 2004: Resolution on Graduate Employee Organizing Rights | AAUP
    Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home 2004 Resolution on Graduate Employee Organizing Rights Cary Nelson the AAUP s second vice president presented a resolution that was adopted by the Executive Committee of the Association s Collective Bargaining Congress at its meeting in October 2004 affirming the right of graduate assistants to engage in collective bargaining and decrying the July 13 2004 decision of the National Labor Relations Board in Brown University that graduate assistants at private universities are not employees Nelson emphasized the need to defend people s rights to make decisions on collective bargaining without intimidation or coercion and urged the Council s endorsement of the resolution The language was amended to add that graduate assistants should be free to decide which organization should represent them The Council adopted the amended Resolution on Graduate Employee Organizing Rights following the July 13 2004 decision of the National Labor Relations Board in Brown University It reads as follows WHEREAS graduate students work as graduate assistants teaching assistants and research assistants in universities and colleges and therefore assume the role of employees in those institutions and WHEREAS the work performed by graduate assistants makes significant contributions to the teaching and research missions of colleges and universities and WHEREAS the national Council of the American Association of University Professors affirmed in 1998 that graduate assistants like other campus employees should have the right to organize to bargain collectively Be it RESOLVED that the national Council of the American Association of University Professors decries the July 2004 National Labor Relations Board decision that graduate assistants at private universities are not employees within the meaning of the National Labor

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/2004-resolution-graduate-employee-organizing-rights (2016-02-13)
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  • Black Colleges with Highest White Enrollments | AAUP
    Higher Education Reports Publications AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home AAUP Policies Reports Academic Freedom and Tenure Investigative Reports College and University Governance Reports Standing Committee and Subcommittee Reports Audit Reports View All Reports Back to Reports and Publications AAUP Redbook The eleventh edition of the Redbook contains foundational AAUP policy documents as well as reports on new issues in higher education Buy yours now Black Colleges with Highest White Enrollments Institution Percentage of White Enrollment Bluefield State College WVa 90 West Virginia State University 83 Shelton State Community College Ala 65 Lincoln University Mo 64 J F Drake State Technical College Ala 47 Kentucky State University 35 Bishop State Communit y College Ala 33 Saint Philips College Tx 31 Langston University Okla 23 Elizabeth City State University NC 22 Tennessee State University 21 Fayetteville State University NC 20 Trenholm State Technical College

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/historically-black-colleges-and-universities-recent-trends-tab1 (2016-02-13)
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  • HBCUs | AAUP
    Sexual Diversity Gender Identity Teaching Evaluation Tenure Women in Higher Education Reports Publications AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns Find Chapters Conferences Start a Chapter I Need Help With Workplace Issues Understanding Terms and Abbreviations Responding to Financial Crisis You are here Home HBCUs Minority Serving Institutions The AAUP is a strong supporter of historically black colleges and universities and their faculty We are engaging in a multi year effort to consult with historically black institutions about academic freedom and shared governance to strengthen academic programs and raise the stature of these institutions among colleges and universities Read more about Minority Serving Institutions Historically Black Colleges and Universities in a Time of Economic Crisis How have HBCUs responded to the current crisis Read more about Historically Black Colleges and Universities in a Time of Economic Crisis How To Paint A Better Portrait Of HBCUs The mainstream media s often negative portrayals of historically black colleges and universities mislead the public and can even exacerbate problems some HBCUs already face Those portrayals can and should be challenged and changed Read more about How To Paint A Better Portrait Of HBCUs Resources on Minority Serving Institutions Other AAUP Resources Historically Black Colleges and Universities Recent Trends 2007 This report was prepared by a subcommittee of the Association s Commitee on Historically Black Institutions and Scholars of Color was approved in November 2006 by the committee for publication Read more about Resources on Minority Serving Institutions Historically Black Colleges and Universities Recent Trends Report discussing recent trends regarding Historically Black Colleges and Universities Read more about Historically Black Colleges and

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/import-tags/hbcus-1 (2016-02-13)
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  • Committee on Historically Black Institutions and Scholars of Color | AAUP
    Workload Family Work Grading Graduate Students The Academic Bill of Rights Minority Serving Institutions Post Tenure Review Retirement Sexual Diversity Gender Identity Teaching Evaluation Tenure Women in Higher Education Reports Publications AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP Bookstore News AAUP in the News AAUP Updates For the Media Get Involved Upcoming Events Local Toolkit Issue Campaigns

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/import-tags/committee-historically-black-institutions-and-scholars-color (2016-02-13)
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  • Statement of Principles on Academic Retirement and Insurance Plans | AAUP
    earlier age 1 Though plan benefits are generally reduced by early retirement such reductions may be offset through supplemental benefit arrangements provided by the individual and or the institution 2 c Phased Retirement The plan should enable individuals who are approaching retirement to arrange on their own initiative reductions in services and salary acceptable both to them and to their institutions 3 3 Ordinarily retirement should occur at the end of the academic year Each institution should make clear whether the summer period attaches to the preceding or the following academic year Individuals should notify the administration of their decision to retire as far in advance as possible 4 At the time of initial appointment and periodically thereafter participants should be both counseled and urged to inform themselves about their retirement options and benefits 5 The institution should provide for a plan of retirement annuities a Such a plan should require participation after not more than one year of service by all fulltime faculty members and administrators who have attained a specified age as determined by relevant federal and state law b It should be financed by regular payments with the institution contributing as much as or more than each participant Contributions should continue during leaves of absence with pay In addition the retirement plan should permit supplementary contributions from participants including those on leaves of absence without pay Individuals should have the opportunity to make both required and voluntary contributions by salary reduction in accordance with relevant tax laws c It should maintain contributions at a level considered sufficient to give long term participants at normal retirement age a continuing combined income from the retirement plan and federal social security that is appropriately related to their level of income prior to retirement with provisions for continuing income to a surviving spouse The recommended objective for those retiring at the normal retirement age who have participated in the plan for at least thirty five years is a continuing after tax income equivalent in purchasing power to approximately two thirds of the yearly disposable salary after taxes and other mandatory deductions during the last few years of full time employment 4 d It should ensure that the full accumulations from the participant s and the institution s contributions are fully and immediately vested in the participant available as a benefit in case of death before annuity payments commence and with no forfeiture in cases of departure or dismissal from the institution e It should be such that the participant may receive the accumulated funds only in the form of an annuity Exceptions might be made for 1 small proportions of the accumulations of retiring participants or 2 small accumulations in inactive accounts 5 6 Since the abolition of mandatory retirement in 1993 some cases that previously would have resulted in involuntary retirement now have to be treated as involuntary termination Such cases should be considered by representatives of the faculty and administration through appropriate procedures 6 Reassignment from administrative duties to

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/statement-principles-academic-retirement-and-insurance-plans (2016-02-13)
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  • 2000 Survey of Retirement Programs | AAUP
    the institutions with limits on maximum benefits the limit is based upon the number of years of service at the institution that faculty members can get credit for in the computation of their pension amounts The modal limit is 40 years however institutions report limits that vary between 25 and 50 with their responses being concentrated in the 30 to 40 year range In slightly over half of the institutions that report limits on the maximum benefit that a faculty member can receive the limit is specified as a cap on the percentage of a faculty member s annual salary that may be received in the form of an annual pension benefit In most of these cases the limit falls in the 65 to 100 percent range In addition to providing a retirement benefit program over 80 percent of the respondents to the survey indicate that their institution offers seminars or other programs to encourage and or assist their faculty in planning for retirement Two year colleges are less likely to provide such programs than their bachelors granting masters granting and doctoral counterparts III Retirement Incentive Programs Slightly less than half of the respondents to the survey 46 2 reported that their institutions have had one or more financial incentive programs since 1995 that encouraged tenured faculty members to retire prior to age 70 table 5 Among the 4 year institutions private institutions were more likely to have such programs than public institutions and doctoral institutions were more likely to have such programs than masters granting institutions which in turn were more likely to have such programs than bachelors granting institutions Sixty percent of the private doctoral granting institutions reported having had a retirement incentive program The 2 year with rank public institutional category was the category in which having had a retirement incentive program was most likely to be reported Slightly more than one third of the institutions 206 in number reported that the financial incentive programs that they had were ones in which they had negotiated buyouts cash payments or other special arrangements on a college by college or case by case basis table 6 Buyouts were again more prevalent among private than public institutions and doctoral institutions were more likely to have such programs than masters granting institutions which in turn were more likely to have them than bachelors granting institutions At the doctoral institution level 72 of the privates but only 38 of the publics reported such arrangements In slightly over half of the cases in which buyouts occurred all tenured faculty members were automatically eligible to take advantage of the buyout if they met the institution s age and or years of service and or age plus years of service requirement for eligibility In the remaining institutions administrative approval was required Similarly in slightly over half of the cases in which buyouts occurred they were offered on an ongoing basis while in the remaining cases eligibility for the special buyout only took place if a faculty member made a commitment to retire with a specified time period window Ongoing buyouts are most useful when an institution is trying to confront the long run implications of the end of mandatory retirement Offering buyouts only within a specified window of time are most useful in a situation when the institution is trying to achieve some short run cost savings Interestingly among those institutions that had had more than one plan since 1995 their previous plans had tended to be window plans A reasonable conjecture is that once a window plan is adopted and then expires faculty believe that future window plans will be adopted and threaten to delay their retirements until a subsequent plan is adopted This puts pressure on institutions to adopt a subsequent plan if they want to encourage their older faculty members to retire Given this behavior it may make sense for institutions to focus on the long run implications of the end of mandatory retirement and adopt ongoing plans in the future Our survey asked respondents about the magnitudes of buyout plans In situations in which cash payments were made to encourage retirement the buyouts tended to be less than nine months salary Fifty five percent of those institutions offering lump sum payments offered less than 9 months salary Twenty eight percent offered 9 to 18 months salary and only 16 percent offered buyouts equivalent to more than 18 months salary In a relatively small number of cases the magnitude of the buyout declined with the age at which the faculty member retired That is in those plans larger buyouts were given to faculty who retired at younger ages The relatively small proportion of plans in which the generosity of the buyout declines with the age of retirement may reflect the legal uncertainty associated with such plans until recent legislative amendments At about 90 institutions the financial incentive to retire took the form of an increment in the faculty member s retirement benefit rather than a cash payment Under current tax laws in most cases additional employer contributions to enhance defined contribution pensions are treated as cash payment and subject to the federal income tax in the year that they are made As a result financial incentives in the form of increments in retirement benefits will be adopted primarily when the institution s retirement plan is of the defined benefit type Often these increments take the form of crediting the faculty member with a specified number of months of additional service credit towards retirement for each year that he or she was actually employed at the institution For example in New York State one recent retirement incentive program provided SUNY faculty members with 1 month s additional service credit for each year they had been employed up to a maximum of 36 months 3 years of additional service credit In a small number of cases 15 in total the financial incentive for retirement took the form of provision of a terminal leave From

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/issues/retirement/survey (2016-02-13)
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