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  • Professors of Practice | AAUP
    with tenure A university president has described professors of practice as premier participant s in the education of students but notwithstanding their crucial role in carrying out this fundamental activity he proposes to deny them the procedural protections that the tenure system provides The AAUP has long held that all full time teachers irrespective of their titles should either be tenured or probationary for tenure except for those appointed under special circumstances for example short term replacements for faculty members who are on leave Following from this basic position the AAUP has been sharply critical of full time non tenure track appointments pointing to the adverse effects of these appointments for individual faculty members for students for academic freedom and for the academic profession as a whole 3 We see no need to repeat these arguments here The argument that non tenure track appointments endanger academic freedom is yet more compelling however when aimed at professors of practice Some advocates of establishing professorships of practice have joined with recent critics of tenure to argue that the protection of tenure is appropriate only for research scholars and is unnecessary and inappropriate for those faculty members whose primary obligation is instruction This argument demeans instruction especially in institutions where teaching is valued as more than the retelling of what is discovered through research Even the presentation of a subject that simply recounts what is widely accepted in an academic field of study may incur controversy at a particular time or in a particular locality More important the argument fails to appreciate the need for teachers to be free to express themselves fully and frankly in the classroom Colleges and universities seek to instill in their students a mature independence of mind Teachers guide students in learning through instruction and example how to think independently in order to form their own judgments Independence of thought is also a characteristic of the successful teacher in higher education The student thus learns from the teacher but the learning is diminished if the academic freedom of that teacher is not secure Freedom in teaching no less than freedom in research suffers if faculty subject to periodic review and serving in positions renewable indefinitely at the pleasure of the administration fear losing their positions because their opinions are deemed too controversial Nor is the freedom of faculty to speak their minds without fear of reprisal limited to what they might say in the classroom Their academic freedom encompasses the right to express opinions on all manner of issues having to do with their institution and its policies and practices Professors of practice are expected to be deeply engaged with students colleagues and administrators on a myriad of controversial educational issues many of which will almost certainly arouse strong opinions At the same time professors of practice are necessarily beholden to others senior tenured colleagues department chairs deans provosts or presidents for continued appointment Because they serve indefinitely at the discretion of others professors of practice might reasonably

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/professors-practice (2016-02-13)
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  • Nonreappointment & Full-Time Renewable Term Appointments | AAUP
    of Nonreappointment provide that Because a probationary appointment even though for a fixed or stated term carries an expectation of renewal the faculty member should be explicitly informed of a decision not to renew an appointment in order that the faculty member may seek a position at another college or university Such notice should be given at an early date since a failure to secure another position for the ensuing academic year will deny the faculty member the opportunity to practice their profession The document goes on to state that Notice of nonreappointment or of intention not to recommend reappointment to the governing board should be given in writing in accordance with the following standards Not later than March 1 of the first academic year of service if the appointment expires at the end of that year or if a one year appointment terminates during an academic year at least three months in advance of its termination Not later than December 15 of the second academic year of service if the appointment expires at the end of that year or if an initial two year appointment terminates during an academic year at least six months in advance of its termination At least twelve months before the expiration of an appointment after two or more years in the institution The Association has viewed these standards as the minimum of proper notification if faculty members are to have an adequate opportunity to secure the professional appointments for which they are qualified Regulation 1 b of the Association s Recommended Institutional Regulations on Academic Freedom and Tenure provides that With the exception of special appointments clearly limited to a brief association with the institution all full time faculty appointments are of two kinds 1 probationary appointments 2 appointments with continuous tenure The AAUP has repeatedly spoken out against the use of full time renewable non tenure track faculty appointments As the authors of Committee A s 1978 report on this subject concluded We think that the very limited exceptions allowed by Regulation 1 b are the most that should be allowed The teacher with tenure is a teacher whose service can be terminated only for adequate cause and we think that every full time teacher should either have that status or be a candidate for it save for those who fall under the exceptions allowed by Regulation 1 b in particular those who are visitors or temporary replacements or for whose subjects the institution in good faith expects to have only a short term need Despite the Association s strictures colleges and universities have increasingly been appointing faculty members to ongoing full time positions in which they are recognized neither as tenured nor as probationary for tenure While academic institutions commonly adhere to the Association s Standards for Notice of Nonreappointment with respect to faculty appointments that they recognize as probationary in many cases they have not considered those standards to be applicable to those full time faculty members whose service under non

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/nonreappointment-full-time-renewable-term-appointments (2016-02-13)
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  • Statement on Procedural Standards in the Renewal or Nonrenewal of Faculty Appointments | AAUP
    decision making body could become reluctant to reach adverse decisions that might culminate in grievance procedures As a result there was some risk that the important distinction between tenure and probation would be eroded Weighed against these important institutional concerns however were the interests of the individual faculty members They could be honestly unaware of the reasons for a negative decision and the decision could be based on a judgment of shortcomings which they could easily remedy if informed of them A decision not to renew an appointment could be based on erroneous information which the faculty member could readily correct if informed of the basis for the decision Again the decision could be based on considerations of institutional policy or program development that have nothing to do with the faculty member s professional competence and if not informed of the reasons the faculty member could mistakenly assume that a judgment of inadequate performance has been made In the face of a persistent refusal to supply the reasons a faculty member may be more inclined to attribute improper motivations to the decision making body or to conclude that its evaluation has been based upon inadequate consideration If the faculty member wished to request a reconsideration of the decision or a review by another body ignorance of the reasons for the decision would create difficulties both in reaching a decision whether to initiate such a request and in presenting a case for reconsideration or review The Association s extensive experience with specific cases since 1971 has confirmed its conclusion that the reasons in support of the faculty member s right to be informed outweigh the countervailing risks Every notice of nonreappointment however need not be accompanied by a written statement of the reasons for nonreappointment It may not always be to the advantage of the faculty member to be informed of the reasons for nonreappointment particularly in writing The faculty member may be placed under obligation to divulge them to the appointing body of another institution if it inquired Similarly a written record is likely to become the basis for continuing responses by the faculty member s former institution to prospective appointing bodies At many institutions moreover the procedures of evaluation and decision may make it difficult if not impossible to compile a statement of reasons that precisely reflects the basis of the decision When a number of faculty members participate in the decision they may oppose a reappointment for a variety of reasons few or none of which may represent a majority view To include every reason no matter how few have held it in a written statement to the faculty member may misrepresent the general view and damage unnecessarily both the morale and the professional future of the faculty member In many situations of course a decision not to reappoint will not reflect adversely upon the faculty member An institution may for example find it necessary for financial or other reasons to restrict its offerings in a given department The acquisition of tenure may depend not only upon satisfactory performance but also upon a long term opening Nonrenewal in these cases does not suggest a serious adverse judgment In these situations providing a statement of reasons either written or oral should pose no difficulty and such a statement may in fact assist the faculty member in searching for a new position Should the faculty member after weighing the considerations cited above decide to request the reasons for the decision against reappointment the reasons should be given The faculty member also should have the opportunity to request a reconsideration by the decision making body The Association accordingly recommends 3 Notice of Reasons In the event of a decision not to renew an appointment the faculty member should be informed of the decision in writing and upon request be advised of the reasons which contributed to that decision The faculty member should also have the opportunity to request a reconsideration by the body or individual that made the decision Written Reasons Having been given orally the reasons that contributed to the decision against reappointment the faculty member to avoid misunderstanding may request that they be confirmed in writing The faculty member may wish to petition the appropriate faculty committee in accordance with Regulation 10 of the Association s Recommended Institutional Regulations to consider an allegation that the reasons given or other reasons that were not stated constitute a violation of academic freedom or improper discrimination The faculty member may wish to petition a committee in accordance with Regulation 15 of the Recommended Institutional Regulations to consider a complaint that the decision resulted from inadequate consideration and was therefore unfair The faculty member may believe that a written statement of reasons might be useful in pursuing a professional career If the department chair or other appropriate institutional officer to whom the request is made believes that confirming the oral statement in writing may be damaging to the faculty member on grounds such as those cited earlier in this statement it would be desirable for that officer to explain the possible adverse consequences of confirming the oral statement in writing If in spite of this explanation the faculty member continues to request a written statement the request should be honored The Association accordingly recommends 4 Written Reasons If the faculty member expresses a desire to petition the grievance committee such as is described in Regulations 10 and 15 of the Association s Recommended Institutional Regulations or any other appropriate committee to use its good offices of inquiry recommendation and report or if the request is made for any other reason satisfactory to the faculty member alone the reasons given in explanation of the nonrenewal should be confirmed in writing Review Procedures Allegations of Violation of Academic Freedom or of Discrimination The best safeguard against a proliferation of grievance petitions on a given campus is the observance of sound principles and procedures of academic freedom and tenure and of institutional government Observance of the

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/statement-procedural-standards-renewal-or-nonrenewal-faculty-appointments (2016-02-13)
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  • Faculty Child Care | AAUP
    AAUP Redbook The eleventh edition of the Redbook contains foundational AAUP policy documents as well as reports on new issues in higher education Buy yours now Faculty Child Care Download faculty child care pdf The statement that follows was approved by the Association s Committee on Women in the Academic Profession adopted by the Association s Council in June 1989 and endorsed by the Seventy fifth Annual Meeting The American Association of University Professors has long recognized the problems associated with combining academic careers and family responsibilities It has developed a body of standards and guidelines to encourage sound institutional practices in this area These include statements on Leaves of Absence for Child Bearing Child Rearing and Family Emergencies 1974 Senior Appointments with Reduced Loads 1987 and Anticipated Medical Leaves of Absence 1987 The Association has supported key legislation in this area Consistent with its recommended policies the AAUP recognizes that for faculty members with child rearing responsibilities to participate successfully in teaching research and service to their institution they must have access to quality child care facilities Universities and colleges should assume a share of the responsibility for the provision of such services to their faculties Employers in and out of academe have found that the provision of on site facilities has led to stronger and more contented families and increased productivity The ability to reach parents easily in an emergency the time and money they save in transportation the opportunity provided them to share an occasional lunch or other daytime activity with their children the retention and recruitment of faculty these are just some of the benefits that accrue from child care arrangements on campus Faculty members derive peace of mind from knowing that their children are receiving quality care and that the operation has long term stability

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/faculty-child-care (2016-02-13)
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  • The Status of Part-Time Faculty | AAUP
    institutions consider modifying their tenure arrangements in order to permit part time faculty ser vice under appropriate conditions to be credited toward the award of tenure and to per mit tenure positions to be held by faculty members who for family or other appropriate reasons cannot serve on a full time basis 13 During the past decade a number of institu tions have modified their tenure regulations so as to permit tenure positions to be held on a part time basis From what the subcommittee has been able to discover the number of faculty members who have actually been granted tenure in a part time position is very small Although we recognize that the large majority of part timers neither need nor desire the privileges of tenure and that for the most part colleges and universities have used part time faculty service in a manner compatible with the health and quality of the institution WE RECOMMEND that colleges and universities depending upon the manner in which they utilize part time faculty service consider creating a class of regular part time faculty members consisting of individuals who as their professional career share the teaching research and administrative duties customary for facul ty at their institution but who for whatever reason do so less than full time They should have the opportunity to achieve tenure and the rights it confers The Asso ciation stands ready to provide guidance to institutions wishing to develop such policies 14 2 Security of Employment for Part time Faculty The part time faculty member who is like the full time faculty member in qualifications and responsibilities frequently has a com parable commitment to his or her institution Many part time faculty members who teach year in and year out can and should participate in institutional life in a way that is both impracticable and unnecessary for part time faculty members whose involve ment is occasional or peripheral The part time faculty member engaged only for high ly specialized courses may also have only a modest commitment to the institution The distinctions in duration of service and in commitment suggest that different types of part timers are entitled to different degrees of security Some institutions as we have stated have acknowledged these distinctions by defining a class of part time faculty eli gible for tenure with attendant rights and responsibilities Of more concern however is minimal employment security for much larger numbers of part time faculty members based not on probation and potential tenure but on more careful initial screening and periodic review by faculty colleagues We realize that fluctuations in enrollment can create unanticipated staffing needs In most instances however one should be able to anticipate at least a term in advance how many sections of a given course will need to be staffed In practice colleges and universi ties often staff courses at the last minute and as a consequence part time appointments are typically made upon the recommendation of a department chair to a dean without benefit of opinion from others in the department This practice has fostered a two class system in which part time faculty members are often isolated from their full time colleagues Often they are left out of departmental meetings they do not participate in curricular planning they have no vote in departmental affairs and they are afforded no opportunity for peer review or for advancement through the academic ranks WE RECOMMEND that part time faculty members not be appointed routinely or repeatedly at the last minute The practice of continually appointing the same part time faculty member on term by term contracts with employment contingent upon enrollment is in the large majority of cases callous and unnecessary WE RECOMMEND that in those instances when cancellation of a course leaves a part time faculty member without an expected appointment financial compensa tion should be made for the time spent in preparing the course and for dealing with the course prior to its cancellation WE RECOMMEND that where part time employment is not casual and occasion al colleges and universities should endeavor to regularize their use of part time faculty members so that they can be appointed in closer conformity to standards and procedures governing full time faculty members We hesitate a little in recom mending formal notice requirements or a presumption of renewal after a specified period We have seen such policies lead to subversion of the principle of adequate notice by issuing blanket notification of nonrenewal by the specified date with the real decision in individual cases held off until later Part time as well as full time faculty members are however entitled to individual consideration in the renewal process Accordingly WE RECOMMEND that part time faculty who have been employed for six or more terms or consecutively for three or more terms receive a full term s notice Any lesser period may prevent their reentry into the part time market given the cycli cal nature of academic appointments The issuance of notice should be preceded by a more thorough faculty role in the evaluation process than is customarily the case with part time faculty members WE RECOMMEND that colleges and universities afford part time faculty mem bers the protections of academic due process summarized in the Association s Aca demic Freedom and Due Process for Faculty Members Who Serve Less Than Full Time In particular part time faculty members should have access to the institution s regu lar grievance procedure 3 Th e Rol e o f Part time Facult y i n Academi c Governance The differing levels of involve ment of part time faculty members in the life of the institution should be reflected in the degree of their involvement in institutional governance The occasional part time faculty member usually has nothing to do with the faculty as a whole and even his or her par ticipation in departmental committees and curricular planning tends to be negligible The more considerable commitment of the part time faculty member whose service is more like that of a full timer does however raise the question whether these part time faculty members should have the right or the obligation to participate in governance and departmental decisions whether for example they should have voting rights Empirical evidence demonstrates that most part time faculty even the regular part time faculty member whose responsibilities include many nonteaching activities tend to have little formal role in university or departmental governance 15 As a consequence their status within the university or college community is diminished Crucial for the sense of professional pride and responsibility that characterize the academic profession is the central role full time faculty members traditionally play in the determination of the structure and content of curricula individual courses and teaching materials Similarly a sense of professionalism is derived from the significant role faculty members play in governing academic departments and in the governance of institutions of higher learning Without access to the governing bodies a faculty mem ber s sense of professionalism is impaired to the potential detriment of the quality of the educational process in which he or she is involved Faculty members who are treat ed like hired hands with syllabi they have played no role in preparing may be insuf ficiently motivated to perform with the care and ingenuity of the faculty member who is actively involved in shaping his or her environment When a faculty is organized for purposes of collective bargaining the appropriate test of inclusion in the bargaining unit that is used by the National Labor Relations Board is whether or not a community of interest or a mutuality of interest exists among the members of the proposed unit If there is a category of part time faculty members com posed of those who are eligible for tenure it appears likely that they would be included in a bargaining unit with full time faculty members Indeed the few part time faculty members who are in this category are often called fractional time or full time with reduced load rather than part time Similar claims for inclusion might be made by part time faculty members paid on a pro rata basis 1 6 independent of their qualifications or security entitlements Politically the inclusion of part time faculty is often viewed as threatening to the interests of the full time faculty and to the degree that the part time fac ulty and full time faculty have different commitments to the institution the threat becomes more real There is a basic problem as to whether a bargaining unit composed primarily of full time faculty members can fairly represent the part time faculty if they are included in the bargaining unit And if the part time faculty are excluded from the unit will the administration exploit them and use them to undercut the full time faculty 1 7 Throughout this statement on part time faculty problems we make proposals designed for the better integration of part time faculty and full time faculty We believe that a bet ter integration will improve the quality of education and the academic climate We also believe that as institutions move toward improved communication between part time and full time faculty members the likelihood of the difficulties posed above occurring in a collective bargaining situation will be lessened Universities and colleges should recognize that participation in academic governance is likely to enhance a faculty member s sense of professionalism and elicit a higher quali ty of performance than can otherwise be expected Moreover the institution would bene fit from the part time faculty member s contributions WE RECOMMEND whenever possible and erring on the side of inclusion rather than exclusion that part time faculty members be involved in the determination of goals techniques and schedules for those courses which they teach Moreover they should be actively involved in planning the curricula of which their courses are a part To the extent that other more general considerations which are dealt with by departmental or institution wide committees impinge on these more spe cific matters relative to courses taught by part time faculty these faculty members should serve as participating members on such committees If part time faculty members are subject to appropriate review procedures and have as they should access to the regular institutional grievance procedure they should also be repre sented on the bodies concerned with these matters when cases involving part time faculty are heard 4 Compensatio n an d Fring e Benefit s fo r Part time Faculty Recent studies suggest that most part time faculty members teach at a per course rate less than that paid to full time facul ty members 18 Data also suggest that they receive fewer fringe benefits than their full time counterparts This is especially true where the individual part time faculty member teach es less than half time and does not participate in the range of faculty responsibilities out side the classroom There is also a small portion of the part time labor market that is paid on a pro rata basis and is eligible for cost of living and merit increases One study con cludes that a little more than one quarter of all institutions currently prorate compensa tion 19 The practice of paying a flat rate per course or per student hour to part time facul ty does little to relate the part time salary payment scale to the salary rates paid to full time faculty Bearing in mind that part time faculty members differ widely among them selves in the nature of the duties they perform the qualifications they possess and the dis ciplines in which they work and appreciating the differences among them in need expec tation and bargaining power we believe that simple fairness obligates institutions to rationalize their compensation of part time faculty members and to develop policies that treat part time faculty equitably WE RECOMMEND that colleges and universities through their regular proce dures devise equitable scales for paying part time faculty members Although the task is difficult it is necessary for colleges and universities to develop appropriate criteria for comparing part time and full time responsibilities properly tak ing into account nonteaching activities and individual qualifications The criteria would enable an institution to determine which part time faculty members appropriately should be paid on a pro rata scale and which should be paid on a per course or per stu dent hour basis In either case some provision should be made for merit seniority and cost of living increases Discussion regarding compensation of part time faculty often proceeds upon the assumption that for many compensation is extra a component but not an essential com ponent of the family income This appears no longer to be the case for an increasing number of part time faculty members 2 0 Even if it were true we do not believe that the degree of individuals financial dependency on their employer should enter significant ly into a determination of compensation for part time faculty In the past such consider ations contributed unduly to the practice of paying housewives who taught part time appreciably less than their male counterparts 2 1 These considerations are often cited in defense of various scales of compensation and of particular salaries as well as to justify other employers practices We believe that they should not be relevant to the measure ment of the degree of a faculty member s commitment to his or her institution nor of the commitment that the institution should make to the faculty member In discussing compensation we must also bear in mind that colleges and universities uti lize part time faculty members in order to effect monetary economies and flexibility in staffing the academic program What must be guarded against are practices that exploit the part time faculty contribute to poor morale and adversely affect the quality of education Such practices inevitably injure not only part time faculty members but also their full time colleagues and most of all students For many part time faculty a wage scale based on a per course rate or a per hour rate is reasonable The full time faculty member who teaches an additional course as an over load may be paid for it on a per course basis the business executive secondary school teacher lawyer or government official who teaches a single course either occasionally or regularly does not look to the part time position as a primary professional commitment By and large these part time faculty teach for stimulation prestige and variety while the pay provided them supplements their basic income More importantly most of these part time faculty members are appointed to teach and the nonteaching functions per formed by full time faculty are not their concern Their own professional development is not significantly related to their part time teaching work The time they spend on read ing and research on participating in meetings and presenting talks usually relates to their primary employment and is compensated by that employer If in line with our pre vious recommendations some of these part time faculty members do become more involved in advising departmental and curricular work and related responsibilities their compensation should reflect this greater commitment Of particular concern to us is the 30 percent of the part time faculty population who teach one or more courses only because they cannot find a full time position Often the income they derive from their teaching and some piece together two or three part time positions at different institutions in order to have the equivalent of a full time position provides their sole means of support These faculty members tend to teach the same courses regularly and frequently perform at least part of the range of non teaching duties of their full time counterparts They deserve adequate compensation and security being peculiarly vulnerable to the exploitation we discussed earlier These part time faculty members are also the unwilling subject of the tensions affecting the members of the full time faculty who have a voice in the establishment of rates of part time compensation If a certain amount of highly cost effective teaching is done by part time faculty their own compensation will be higher On the other hand this would mean that the out of classroom duties associated with the courses and students taught by the part time faculty must often be performed by the full time faculty If the ratio of full time to part time faculty becomes small the full time faculty can become overbur dened and the quality of education will suffer Moreover increasing numbers of part time faculty members are being appointed in an attempt to avoid any institutional com mitment to tenure the presence of large numbers of faculty serving at will can have a chilling effect on general conditions of academic freedom at the institution as well as on academic quality Finally the presence of a source of cheap substitute labor may well depress the compensation scale of full time faculty What is required is a balance between retaining institutional flexibility and avoiding the exploitation of part time faculty that may lead to the exploitation of full time faculty as well Accrediting bodies have been guided by various ratios to express the desired balance between full time and part time faculty in a healthy academic institution Such ratios grew out of the perception that part time faculty members because of their commitment of time to an institution were unable to provide the amount of administrative service curricular planning and service in academic governance considered appropriate to sus tain a vigorous academic enterprise Currently it is more difficult to gauge what propor tion of a curriculum in a variety of disciplines can be taught by part time faculty without endangering the quality of education Colleges and universities must be mindful of the dangers of misusing part time faculty members and eroding their academic standards They must recognize the diverse ways in which part

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/status-part-time-faculty (2016-02-13)
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  • Faculty Appointment and Family Relationship | AAUP
    Reports View All Reports Back to Reports and Publications AAUP Redbook The eleventh edition of the Redbook contains foundational AAUP policy documents as well as reports on new issues in higher education Buy yours now Faculty Appointment and Family Relationship Download family appointment and family relationship pdf The following statement prepared initially by the Association s Committee on Women in the Academic Profession was approved by that committee and by Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure The statement was adopted by the Association s Council in April 1971 and endorsed by the Fifty seventh Annual Meeting It was endorsed in June 1971 by the board of directors of the Association of American Colleges now the Association of American Colleges and Universities In recent years and particularly in relation to efforts to define and safeguard the rights of women in academic life members of the profession have evidenced increasing concern over policies and practices that prohibit in blanket fashion the appointment retention or the holding of tenure of more than one member of the same family on the faculty of an institution of higher education or of a school or department within an institution so called anti nepotism regulations Such policies and practices subject faculty members to an automatic decision on a basis wholly unrelated to academic qualifications and limit them unfairly in their opportunity to practice their profession In addition they are contrary to the best interests of the institution which is deprived of qualified faculty members on the basis of an inappropriate criterion and of the community which is denied a sufficient utilization of its resources The Association recognizes the propriety of institutional regulations that would set reasonable restrictions on an individual s capacity to function as judge or advocate in specific situations involving members of his or

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/faculty-appointment-and-family-relationship (2016-02-13)
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  • Controversy in the Classroom | AAUP
    Publications AAUP Redbook The eleventh edition of the Redbook contains foundational AAUP policy documents as well as reports on new issues in higher education Buy yours now Controversy in the Classroom Advertisements have appeared in the campus press by an organization Students for Academic Freedom calling on students to report professors who try to impose their political opinions in the classroom This is not the first time that self appointed watchdogs of classroom utterances have focused on the professoriate The John Birch Society undertook that role in the 1960s an organization called Accuracy in Academia did so in the 1980s and Campus Watch assumed that role for professors of Middle Eastern studies after September 11 2001 What is different is that this organization purports to rely on AAUP principles in condemning the introduction of controversial matter having no relation to the subject and to take upon itself the mission of defining what is in and out of bounds The AAUP has long maintained that instructors should avoid the persistent intrusion of matter controversial or not that has no bearing on the subject of instruction Any such practice would be expected to be taken up as part of the regular evaluations of teaching routinely conducted in higher education evaluations that commonly include surveys of student experience The advertised call goes well beyond a concern for poor pedagogy however It rests on a right claimed in the name of academic freedom not to be confronted with controversy in the classroom not at least beyond what the organization conceives of as germane to the subject as defined by it The project s stated purpose as its ad puts it is to rule out of bounds any reference to the war in Iraq in a course whose subject is not the war in Iraq

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/report/controversy-classroom (2016-02-13)
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  • View All Reports | AAUP
    Southern University Baton Rouge SUBR and the subsequent terminations of tenured professors and restructuring of academic programs Read more about Academic Freedom and Tenure Southern University Baton Rouge Here s the News The Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession 2012 13 Results of the AAUP s annual survey of full time faculty compensation Read more about Here s the News The Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession 2012 13 College and University Governance The University of Virginia Governing Board s Attempt to Remove the President This report documents a major breakdown in governance at UVA focusing on the role of the board of visitors and its rector Helen Dragas who initiated the effort to force the president s resignation It finds that the events at the university resulted from a failure by those charged with institutional oversight to understand the institution over which they presided and to engage with the administration and the faculty in an effort to be well informed Read more about College and University Governance The University of Virginia Governing Board s Attempt to Remove the President Institutional Accreditation A Call for Greater Faculty Involvement A report calling for greater faculty involvement in the accreditation of colleges and universities Read more about Institutional Accreditation A Call for Greater Faculty Involvement Academic Freedom and Tenure Grove City College Although a faculty member was terminated by the administration of Grove City College for stated cause for his grade distribution and teaching performance it was done without any due process The dismissal action in this case was accompanied by collateral controversy disclosure of unusual attendant circumstances and frequent display of emotion Many of these elements were reported in the press and by radio and television broadcast Therefore the investigating committee additionally issued a set of Supplementary Observations and these are included in this report Read more about Academic Freedom and Tenure Grove City College Academic Freedom and Tenure Frank Phillips College The administration of Frank Phillips College dismissed a faculty member without providing cause without academic due process and without providing for any payment of salary beyond the date of notification of dismissal Read more about Academic Freedom and Tenure Frank Phillips College Academic Freedom and Tenure Concordia Seminary Despite the recommendations of his colleagues and inadequate notice of the termination of his services the administration of Concordia Seminary terminated a faculty member based on outside ecclesiastical authorities displeasure with his views on matters that fell within his academic competence Read more about Academic Freedom and Tenure Concordia Seminary Academic Freedom and Tenure State University of New York Report regarding retrenchments at the State University of New York that were initiated by the University administration without appropriate consultation with the faculty and without any showing of a financial exigency They were overseen by the administration with disregard for the rights of tenure for due notice and for the role of the faculty in institutional government Read more about Academic Freedom and Tenure State University

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/reports/view-all-reports?page=1 (2016-02-13)
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