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  • Editor's Introduction - Volume 4 | AAUP
    at university administrations What Heins asks of dissenting scholars and students on Israeli university campuses Heins also argues that decisions about whether particular institutions are complicit in maintaining the occupation and thereby denying Palestinian rights could involve unpalatable and unwise tests of political orthodoxy For these and other reasons Heins argues that the AAUP should maintain its policy of opposition to academic boycotts The next contribution is from Bill V Mullen who curates a series of essays on the topic of the Palestinian boycott divestment and sanctions BDS campaign These essays include pieces by Barghouti Johar Schueller and Lloyd and Hermez and Soukarieh In his contribution Mullen covers the history of the AAUP s 2006 decision against academic boycotts and argues that political events since then warrant a reconsideration of this decision Mullen then offers an overview of the main themes in the essays he curated which include arguments about the conceptual weakness of the AAUP line in relation to academic boycotts assertions that AAUP policy tacitly grants exceptional status to Israel in light of its prior censure of South Africa and analysis of the manner in which invocation of academic freedom in Middle Eastern universities such as the American University of Beirut helps advance US Israeli interests Mullen concludes by arguing that academic freedom is a tool used by Israel and its proponents to shut down potentially critical debate The next contribution is from Omar Barghouti who argues that the AAUP s definition of academic freedom implicitly privileges the nation state In so doing Barghouti argues the AAUP ignores the rights of occupied people Further he suggests that by privileging academic freedom AAUP policy ignores other questions of human rights and the obligation to respect the rights of others Malini Johar Schueller and David Lloyd s essay expands on some of the ideas articulated by Barghouti They draw for example on Judith Butler s analysis to suggest that AAUP policy is articulated from a position of geopolitical privileged in that sense that it does not acknowledge that some subjects cannot lay claim to the discourse of rights itself Like Barghouti that is Johar Schueller and Lloyd point to the thorny case of granting rights to people who inhabit a country under occupation In such conditions they argue the AAUP s tacit policy of letting all sides speak ignores that fact that what they see as a settler colonial state Israel cannot be equated with the inhabitants of an occupied land the Palestinians Their essay points to instances of the systematic denial of academic freedom to Palestinians by Israel and discusses the campaign of harassment of critics of Zionism in the US which is often conducted in the name of academic freedom Concluding Mullen s dossier Sami Hermez and Mayssoun Soukarieh s article explores the impact of invocations of academic freedom by presidents of American universities in the Middle East In such a context they argue ideas of free exchange ignore the ethical claims by Arab governments for a boycott

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  • Editor's Introduction - Volume 5 | AAUP
    cites former University of Michigan president James Duderstadt s bald declaration that faculty have to be taken out of the loop of university decision making 1 Ironically Nelson seems not to have considered the extent to which Wise s unilateral revocation of Salaita s job offer dramatically undermines traditions of shared governance If as Nelson has it in the title of his essay shared governance is one leg of the three legged stool of U S higher education the other two legs being academic freedom and tenure that stool is looking increasingly rickety 2 As Nelson himself puts it academic freedom is an empty concept or an effectively diminished one if the faculty does not control its enforcement through shared governance 3 To what extent we might wonder does the metaphor of the three legged stool obscure the true nature of the US academy Does this metaphor provide an adequate lens through which to analyze the increasing power of the administrative branch of the university A recent report by the Delta Cost Project for example revealed that administrative hiring drove a 28 percent boom in the higher education workforce over the last decade while the numbers of full time faculty per administrator declined by 40 percent Given this shift in staffing we may well wonder whether Nelson s metaphor helps naturalize the distribution of power in post 1945 higher education in the United States Over the last several decades there have been many laments about the creeping corporatization of the university The increasing percentage of precarious teachers who staff classrooms is a key node of these trends since temporary labor is a product of the drive to increase university profit margins that not incidentally leads to insecurity of tenure for the entire professoriate In tandem with this shift towards what Jennifer Washburn calls University Inc US universities have after September 11 2001 been subjected to increasing political pressure intended to squelch critique of the hyper nationalist belligerent imperialism of the War on Terror 4 In Dangerous Professors Malini Johar Schueller and I argue that these two trends academic capitalism and imperialism need to be seen as operating in tandem to silence dissenting voices to dismantle meaningful forms of shared governance on campus and to destroy the university s capacity to promote the kinds of critical dialogue essential to a vibrant democracy 5 As Piya Chatterjee and Sunaina Maira argue in a recent essay collection attacks on critical voices within the academy are part of a project to reestablish US higher education as a key site for the articulation of the racism militarism and nationalism that undergird US imperialism 6 The US academy they contend is a thoroughly imperial university How then might we begin to decolonize US higher education and dismantle the neoliberal structures that support it Chatterjee and Maira s argument that academic freedom has been institutionalized as a limited and problematic horizon for progressive academic mobilization is an important one 7 I concur with their call to foster insurgent spaces within the academy that can work in alliance with organic intellectuals or movements beyond the university 8 But I worry about how long such insurgent spaces can survive in isolation in the academy While we must recognize the imperial university for what it is we should not I think give up on the project of radical institutional transformation We must surely rally to defend academic freedom in the Salaita case and also build links with extramural antiracist anti imperial movements but it would be a mistake to ignore the broader issues of institutional power within the academy discussed here A project of radical institutional transformation can draw strength from the AAUP s own history We should recall that at its inception the AAUP was not primarily focused on maintaining Nelson s three legged stool To the contrary the organization s founders had far more progressive goals As Hans Joerg Tiede argues in his essay To Make Collective Action Possible published in this volume of the Journal of Academic Freedom AAUP founders such as Columbia University psychology professor James McKeen Cattell were animated by visions of sweeping democratic transformation within the university and in society at large Indeed Cattell militated for the elimination of the office of the university president in its dominant form The trouble in the case of the university president is that he is not a leader but a boss He is selected by and is responsible to a body practically outside the university which in the private corporations is responsible to nobody Even apparently more conservative figures such as Arthur Lovejoy and E R A Seligman embraced Progressive era goals of democratizing American society For reform minded scholars such as Seligman the US university was at a stage that corresponded to an aristocratic republic ruled by wealthy powerbrokers with scant connection to the real constituency of the academy students and professors For his part Lovejoy argued that No arrangement in which the university teaching profession has even a limited jurisdiction over university policies only upon sufferance is likely to be regarded as permanently endurable by the university teachers of America when as a class they attain a fully developed professional self consciousness It was only as Progressive Era energies waned Tiede reminds us that the newly established AAUP consolidated itself primarily around the defense of academic freedom and tenure Yet as Cary Nelson insists no university is an island Perhaps we cannot hope to catalyze progressive institutional changes in US higher education without broader social transformation without an ebbing of the tide of racism militarism and nationalism that drives US imperialism today But it is equally true that we cannot hope to defend spaces of anti imperial critique in the academy without a vision and set of concrete goals for the democratization of US higher education The Salaita case demonstrates that the main constituents of the university students and teachers have lost control of the key institutions of institutional power the office of the president and the board of trustees Across the country these pinnacles of power in the university are occupied by individuals who are almost always politically appointed the product of a revolving door that links elite corporate boardrooms and politicians whose elections have been bankrolled by those same corporations or by astroturf populist organizations bankrolled by the 1 percent Faced with this pervasive corruption of democracy inside and outside the university we might benefit from a reanimation of the AAUP founders radical ideals Shared governance and academic freedom should be our minimal demands It is surely time to advance a more ambitious set of goals for the decolonization and democratization of US higher education We kick off this issue of the Journal of Academic Freedom with Hans Joerg Tiede s essay To Make Collective Action Possible The Founding of the AAUP Tiede s article reminds us that the AAUP was not founded to protect academic freedom alone Discussing the conflicts of the late nineteenth century between university governing boards predominantly populated by businessmen corporate lawyers and faculty members Tiede reminds us that founding members of the AAUP did not shy away from battles against the autocratic institutional structure of universities at the time Like other Progressive Era activists these intellectuals sought to democratize key social institutions Defending the academic freedom of professors such as Stanford s Edward Ross who was fired in 1901 on the orders of Jane Stanford herself was only one of their goals As Tiede documents however the AAUP never articulated proposals as radical as those of individual members such as James McKeen Cattell whose University Control called for the election of university governing boards and the abolition of the office of university president As Progressive Era energies waned Tiede tells us the AAUP set aside such radical goals to focus on the defense of academic freedom As I argue above Tiede s essay is an extremely timely reminder of the democratizing ideals that animated many of the AAUP s founders at the time of the organization s inception Kenneth Garcia s essay Religion Sectarianism and the Pursuit of Truth Reexamining Academic Freedom in the Twenty First Century also looks back to the founding ideals of the AAUP nearly a century ago For Garcia the AAUP s famous statement of principles in 1915 was characterized by a determination to pursue truth in its broadest possible sense Since then Garcia argues the right to seek out knowledge has become increasingly constrained within the narrow confines of specialized disciplinary knowledge Writing from a denominational institution Garcia argues that this increasing specialization has come at a cost that can include the quest for spiritual truth While principles of academic freedom in religious institutions such as his own must incorporate current secular standards Garcia writes they should also recognize the mind s desire for the infinite Garcia argues that the AAUP should reexamine documents such as the 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure and perhaps consider reanimating elements of the original 1915 Declaration of Principles Whether or not one agrees with Garcia s arguments concerning the place of the spiritual his call to reexamine the AAUP s founding documents is certainly a salutary one Like Tiede and Garcia s essays the next two articles also adopt a historical lens but focus on more recent institutional transformations in US higher education Richard Teichgraeber s Tenure Matters An Historian s Perspective takes up the gauntlet thrown down by the 2006 report of the Modern Language Association Task Force on Evaluating Scholarship for Tenure and Promotion how to justify the institution of tenure to a nonacademic audience Teichgraeber approaches this challenge through the eyes of a historian leading him to conclude that tenure cannot consistently be seen as a single concept or policy uniformly applied across institutions and time Instead he argues that tenure should be regarded as a complex set of practices that have evolved very significantly during the last half century While tenure certainly is essential to the protection of professors rights to explore controversial ideas unhindered Teichgraeber argues that at its core tenure is about faculty self regulation rather than free speech In order to support this contention Teichgraeber engages in an illuminating discussion of Alvin Kernan s memoir In Plato s Cave a mordant account of Kernan s distinguished career as a professor and later provost and dean at Yale and Princeton At Yale in the 1950s tenure like hiring itself was governed by political favoritism and old boy networking It was only with the collapse of the academic job market in the late 1960s and I would add the impact on the academy of new social movements such as feminism and civil rights that tenure was transformed into a fairly transparent and equitable institution designed to ensure due process in faculty appointments Yet as Teichgraeber shows the paradigm for this transformation in the institution of tenure was set by elite research institutions like Yale Why he asks should the model of a specialized research scholar be the dominant and even the sole standard by which to judge and award continuous faculty appointment Given the diversity of academia today and the need most importantly to address the unjust conditions endured by precarious employees should there not be many different paths to job security in higher education Jeffrey Buller s The Two Cultures of Higher Education in the Twenty First Century and Their Impact on Academic Freedom revisits C P Snow s famous lament concerning the bifurcation of intellectual culture into two antithetical traditions the sciences and the humanities If Snow s diatribe was an attack on the scientific philistinism of the British ruling class Buller argues that a yawning gap is opening today between those who view a university education as the cornerstone of a democratic society and those who view it simply as a form of job training or as an economic development program The latter camp according to Buller includes most contemporary politicians who are of course the same people who not only make decisions regarding the funding of higher education but also select boards of trustees and presidents The result is an increasing emphasis on vocational education and an insistence that research of all kinds should have a virtually immediate positive economic impact In the eyes of these latter day Gradgrinds students should only study STEM science technology engineering and mathematics disciplines they should be severely discouraged from taking time to explore various disciplines before declaring their majors and academic freedom should exist only to the extent that it facilitates the development of innovative products and untapped markets To bridge the two cultures of contemporary higher education and thereby to defend academic freedom Buller argues we need to emphasize not simply the edifying and critical function played by the humanities and social sciences but also their important economic benefits Is this a Faustian pact Buller does not tackle this question but it is an important one given the endorsement of intellectual cultural and education industries as an urban growth machine by institutions such as NYU The next three essays all deal with various assaults on academic freedom and are therefore of particular consequence given the unfolding crisis at the University of Illinois In The Case of the Student Racist Facebook Message Timothy Shiell discusses debates about university hate speech policies which have been unfolding for over thirty years Despite the fact that broad regulations concerning hate speech on campus have repeatedly been struck down by courts Shiell notes most universities still have policies that violate free speech guarantees Shiell s paper employs an engaging heuristic device of a hypothetical racist Facebook posting by a student and a debate over the ensuing forms of discipline to which the university subjects this student in order to evaluate the emerging issue of cyber hate speech Shiell analyzes various allegations lodged in this hypothetical case including that the student was using abusive language that this language was a form of harassment that it infringed the institution s computer conduct code and that it violated university discriminatory conduct policy All of these allegations Shiell concludes are unsustainable Drawing on case law in which civility rules have repeatedly been struck down by the courts Shiell argues that to be punishable speech must constitute genuine harassment and a direct threat Public university officials Shiell concludes do not have the right to silence students or punish their speech including their use of social media unless that speech meets very strict and specific legal requirements Gerald Turkel s Emergencies and Due Process Developing an Involuntary Emergence Leave Policy at the University of Delaware discusses the 2010 suspension of two faculty members after it was concluded that they posed a danger to themselves and their colleagues The background to this discussion of course is the terrible spate of campus violence of recent years from Virginia Tech to the University of California Santa Barbara While most institutions have developed policies relating to student conduct Turkel argues many have yet to articulate clear guidelines for how to cope with faculty members who engage in dangerous or erratic behavior What kind of procedures can the university establish Turkel asks in order to respect faculty members while also reacting in the timely manner consistent with such recognized emergencies Turkel s discussion follows the debates that unfolded at the University of Delaware as a policy was drafted that aimed to balance maximum due process confidentiality and campus safety One of the key issues debated at Delaware was how to distinguish emergency situations from non emergency situations Of equal consequence in the debates however was faculty concern over administrative power grabbing Turkel argues that faculty at the University of Delaware came to believe that no policy was essentially a tacit policy since it left all power in the hands of administrators Having reached this conclusion Delaware faculty proceeded to draft an emergency involuntary leave policy through an inclusive and judicious process that included reviews of other institution s protocols This process Turkel implicitly suggests offers a model of how shared governance can permit policies to be developed that govern even the most challenging conditions that confront university campuses today Concluding this section on contemporary challenges to academic freedom Adria Battaglia considers the use of academic freedom as a kind of rhetorical football in her essay Opportunities of Our Own Making The Struggle for Academic Freedom Far from being a transparent and universal guarantee of freedom of inquiry speech and learning in higher education academic freedom is a privileged label that grants legitimacy to those who wield it Battaglia suggests In particular Battaglia documents David Horowitz s campaign with the organization Students for Academic Freedom to demonize professors teaching what he views as partisan material As Battaglia astutely observes the great majority of the people whom Horowitz attacks teach in women s studies or ethnic studies departments virtually none of them teach in economics departments Horowitz s ideas about partisan political content in scholarship and teaching are thus clearly partisan and yet he consistently attempts to frame academic freedom in terms of the right to learn and the responsibility to teach material that is universally accepted and true To counter Horowitz s rhetorical moves Battaglia offers a valuable history of academic freedom in the course of which she distinguishes it from free speech by noting that the former became established practice thanks in part to the efforts of the AAUP before the latter had been accepted in many states Battaglia argues that academic freedom s increasing subsumption by loose notions of free speech has made it an easy tool to use in attacking radicals To challenge this subsumption Battaglia returns to the key 1957 US Supreme Court decision recognizing academic freedom as protected by the First Amendment This statement Battaglia argues was crucially influenced by arguments from a group of senior South African scholars who were intent on challenging official state policies of apartheid or legalized racial segregation Battaglia suggests that in citing

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/reports-publications/journal-academic-freedom/volume-5-2014/editors-introduction-volume-5 (2016-02-13)
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  • Religion, Sectarianism, and the Pursuit of Truth: Reexamining Academic Freedom in the Twenty-First Century | AAUP
    2011 Volume 3 2012 Volume 4 2013 Volume 5 2014 Editor s Introduction Volume 5 To Make Collective Action Possible The Founding of the AAUP Religion Sectarianism and the Pursuit of Truth Reexamining Academic Freedom in the 21st Century Tenure Matters An Historian s Perspective The Two Cultures of Higher Education in the Twenty First Century and their Impact on Academic Freedom The Case of the Student Racist Facebook Message Emergencies and Due Process Developing an Involuntary Emergency Leave Policy at the University of Delaware Opportunities of Our Own Making The Struggle for Academic Freedom Open Access to Technology Shared Governance of the Academy s Virtual Worlds On the Pros and Cons of Being a Faculty Member at E Text University On the Ground in Kansas Social Media Academic Freedom and the Fight for Higher Education Volume 6 2015 AAUP Bookstore Religion Sectarianism and the Pursuit of Truth Reexamining Academic Freedom in the Twenty First Century By Kenneth Garcia Abstract The one hundredth anniversary of the AAUP in 2015 offers us an opportunity to consider how the concept of academic freedom might evolve in the future In this essay I offer a friendly critique of our customary understanding of academic freedom not because the principle of it is wrong but because our understanding of it is incomplete This incompleteness leads to shortcomings in the practice of academic freedom shortcomings that need to be addressed particularly in religiously affiliated institutions I make my case in three steps 1 I examine sectarian obstacles both religious and secular to academic freedom 2 I offer a brief history of the development of academic freedom in the United States and show why it is not always as freeing in practice as its ideal suggests and 3 I propose a theological understanding of academic freedom that

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/reports-publications/journal-academic-freedom/volume-5-2014/religion-sectarianism-and-pursuit-truth (2016-02-13)
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  • Tenure Matters: An Historian’s Perspective | AAUP
    Century Tenure Matters An Historian s Perspective The Two Cultures of Higher Education in the Twenty First Century and their Impact on Academic Freedom The Case of the Student Racist Facebook Message Emergencies and Due Process Developing an Involuntary Emergency Leave Policy at the University of Delaware Opportunities of Our Own Making The Struggle for Academic Freedom Open Access to Technology Shared Governance of the Academy s Virtual Worlds On the Pros and Cons of Being a Faculty Member at E Text University On the Ground in Kansas Social Media Academic Freedom and the Fight for Higher Education Volume 6 2015 AAUP Bookstore Tenure Matters An Historian s Perspective By Richard F Teichgraeber III Abstract This paper juxtaposes i the findings of the 2006 Modern Language Association Task Force on Evaluating Scholarship for Tenure and Promotion with ii the story that Alvin Kernan tells in his professorial memoir In Plato s Cave 1999 about his pursuit of tenure at Yale in the 1950s and early 1960s to advance the view that tenure is best understood as a practice defined by a set of protocols that have been created and elaborated over time Seeing that tenure has a history I argue requires sorting out a complex set of aims actions and expectations that have defined institutional relationships These include roles of authority professionals standards constraints rewards and sanctions all of which have changed over time When Kernan began his career sixty years ago for example authority for tenure decisions at almost all American colleges and universities lay entirely in the hands of boards of trustees presidents senior academic administrators and department chairmen Only in the last decades of the twentieth century did it become standard practice to ground tenure decisions in the assumption that the most competent judges of the qualities of candidates for tenure were already tenured faculty working in a similar field The aims of tenure understood simply as a continuous faculty appointment also have changed over time Safeguarding academic freedom long has been among them But there are have been several others attracting people to poorly paid jobs reinforcing the desire of talented people to stay at institutions that hire them upgrading the faculty by carefully screening junior faculty to eliminate all but the most talented and most recently as the 2006 MLA Task Force Report makes clear identifying faculty talent chiefly as a matter of specialized research and published scholarship that is perceived as outstanding by their disciplinary peers The means have changed too Fifty years ago except at a small handful of elite institutions like Yale there was nothing resembling today s elaborate and time consuming tenure review process let alone a consensus regarding specific criteria or protocols for acquiring denying or terminating continuous faculty appointments As a result most American colleges and universities routinely awarded and denied continuous faculty appointments with little regard for due process In using Kernan s tenure tale to draw attention to the largely neglected history of tenure my aim is

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/reports-publications/journal-academic-freedom/volume-5-2014/tenure-matters-historian%E2%80%99s-perspective (2016-02-13)
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  • The Two Cultures of Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century and Their Impact on Academic Freedom | AAUP
    Founding of the AAUP Religion Sectarianism and the Pursuit of Truth Reexamining Academic Freedom in the 21st Century Tenure Matters An Historian s Perspective The Two Cultures of Higher Education in the Twenty First Century and their Impact on Academic Freedom The Case of the Student Racist Facebook Message Emergencies and Due Process Developing an Involuntary Emergency Leave Policy at the University of Delaware Opportunities of Our Own Making The Struggle for Academic Freedom Open Access to Technology Shared Governance of the Academy s Virtual Worlds On the Pros and Cons of Being a Faculty Member at E Text University On the Ground in Kansas Social Media Academic Freedom and the Fight for Higher Education Volume 6 2015 AAUP Bookstore The Two Cultures of Higher Education in the Twenty First Century and Their Impact on Academic Freedom By Jeffrey L Buller Abstract Like C P Snow s two cultures of the humanities and the sciences a new bimodal view of higher education is becoming increasingly important at the start of the twenty first century one that sees the goal of universities as developing the whole person and another that sees it as largely or even exclusively in terms of job training The problem many academics face is that the culture of higher education that regards it as preparation for a career is now widely shared by legislators members of governing boards and others who set the budgets or colleges and universities Because of this divide there is increased pressure on administrators and professors alike to shift the focus of higher education away from pure research to applied research and to appraise both the teaching and research missions of higher education on the basis of their returns on investment Moreover faculty members in the arts humanities and social sciences find themselves

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/reports-publications/journal-academic-freedom/volume-5-2014/two-cultures-higher-education-twenty (2016-02-13)
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  • The Case of the Student Racist Facebook Message | AAUP
    of Academic Freedom About Contact Call for Papers Volume 1 2010 Volume 2 2011 Volume 3 2012 Volume 4 2013 Volume 5 2014 Editor s Introduction Volume 5 To Make Collective Action Possible The Founding of the AAUP Religion Sectarianism and the Pursuit of Truth Reexamining Academic Freedom in the 21st Century Tenure Matters An Historian s Perspective The Two Cultures of Higher Education in the Twenty First Century and their Impact on Academic Freedom The Case of the Student Racist Facebook Message Emergencies and Due Process Developing an Involuntary Emergency Leave Policy at the University of Delaware Opportunities of Our Own Making The Struggle for Academic Freedom Open Access to Technology Shared Governance of the Academy s Virtual Worlds On the Pros and Cons of Being a Faculty Member at E Text University On the Ground in Kansas Social Media Academic Freedom and the Fight for Higher Education Volume 6 2015 AAUP Bookstore The Case of the Student Racist Facebook Message By Timothy C Shiell Abstract Despite a long list of judicial decisions striking down broadly worded university speech codes universities continue to promulgate and enforce such policies under various guises This essay examines a case in which a committee of administrators and faculty sought to punish a student for a racist Facebook message alleged to be harassment a threat disorderly conduct and a disruption On the one side the committee claimed its action was supported by legal doctrines regarding contracts time place and manner restrictions captive audiences student social media use and the university s zero tolerance policy On the other side faculty First Amendment advocates argued the student s speech was protected speech This article attempts to lay out the arguments on both sides and establish that the student s speech and speech like it is so

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  • Emergencies and Due Process: Developing an Involuntary Emergency Leave Policy at the University of Delaware | AAUP
    4 2013 Volume 5 2014 Editor s Introduction Volume 5 To Make Collective Action Possible The Founding of the AAUP Religion Sectarianism and the Pursuit of Truth Reexamining Academic Freedom in the 21st Century Tenure Matters An Historian s Perspective The Two Cultures of Higher Education in the Twenty First Century and their Impact on Academic Freedom The Case of the Student Racist Facebook Message Emergencies and Due Process Developing an Involuntary Emergency Leave Policy at the University of Delaware Opportunities of Our Own Making The Struggle for Academic Freedom Open Access to Technology Shared Governance of the Academy s Virtual Worlds On the Pros and Cons of Being a Faculty Member at E Text University On the Ground in Kansas Social Media Academic Freedom and the Fight for Higher Education Volume 6 2015 AAUP Bookstore Emergencies and Due Process Developing an Involuntary Emergency Leave Policy at the University of Delaware By Gerry Turkel Abstract Following two instances of faculty members being placed on involuntary leave with pay by the University administration it became clear to the AAUP leadership the University Senate leadership and the administration that the absence of a policy on emergency situations requiring faculty members to be banned from teaching and from being present on campus was a serious gap in defining both the powers of the administration and the due process rights of faculty members Beginning in the spring of 2011 a committee was established that included key administrators the University of Delaware General Counsel AAUP officers and the president of the University Faculty Senate to draft a policy for action by the senate Following numerous drafts meetings and an open meeting of the senate the senate approved a policy in spring 2012 The substance of the policy its due process provisions and the responsibilities it

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/reports-publications/journal-academic-freedom/volume-5-2014/emergencies-and-due-process-developing (2016-02-13)
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  • Opportunities of Our Own Making: The Struggle for "Academic Freedom" | AAUP
    2014 AAUP Policies Reports Academe Economic Status Report Compensation Survey Bulletin of the AAUP The Redbook Journal of Academic Freedom About Contact Call for Papers Volume 1 2010 Volume 2 2011 Volume 3 2012 Volume 4 2013 Volume 5 2014 Editor s Introduction Volume 5 To Make Collective Action Possible The Founding of the AAUP Religion Sectarianism and the Pursuit of Truth Reexamining Academic Freedom in the 21st Century Tenure Matters An Historian s Perspective The Two Cultures of Higher Education in the Twenty First Century and their Impact on Academic Freedom The Case of the Student Racist Facebook Message Emergencies and Due Process Developing an Involuntary Emergency Leave Policy at the University of Delaware Opportunities of Our Own Making The Struggle for Academic Freedom Open Access to Technology Shared Governance of the Academy s Virtual Worlds On the Pros and Cons of Being a Faculty Member at E Text University On the Ground in Kansas Social Media Academic Freedom and the Fight for Higher Education Volume 6 2015 AAUP Bookstore Opportunities of Our Own Making The Struggle for Academic Freedom By Adria Battaglia Abstract This essay examines David Horowitz s Academic Freedom campaign specifically exploring how academic freedom a narrative that appears alongside free speech discourse frequently since September 11 2001 can be understood as a site of struggle a privileged label that grants legitimacy to those controlling it This analysis includes public debates interviews and blog postings spanning the 2003 launch of Horowitz s campaign discussions of the proposed legislation in 2007 and his publication in 2009 of One Party Classroom By exposing the various ways Horowitz s campaign is framed in the media by interested parties I demonstrate how the link between academic freedom and free speech becomes a rhetorical strategy by which we can gain political

    Original URL path: http://www.aaup.org/reports-publications/journal-academic-freedom/volume-5-2014/opportunities-our-own-making-struggle (2016-02-13)
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