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  • Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    and the lake for traditional activities and Read the rest of this story 2 Comments Peigi Wilson Peigi Wilson a Métis from Ontario has worked for the United Nations Environment Program the Assembly of First Nations Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Environment Canada In her 18 year career as a lawyer and advocate Peigi has promoted respect for the environment and Indigenous rights as a necessary joint objective In a recent discussion with Peigi about her Master of Laws thesis completed in 2009 Peigi discussed the importance of Indigenous participation in environmental governance Environmental issues are a collective threat as all populations are affected The loss of biological diversity threatens our resiliency the loss of different ways of looking at the world or addressing a problem threatens our intellectual capacity to respond to threats Therefore to ensure environmental protection it is advised that different schools of thought be explored when creating environmental policy As our societies are interconnected we need to come together to develop environmental legislation that Read the rest of this story No Comments Lessons from the Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Even though Liz Esquega has learned much from Elders she works with in Winnipeg as the Coordinator for SEED Winnipeg s Aboriginal Community Collaborations the lessons she received from her grandmother as a child were what originally informed her outlook on life and her outlook on some pressing environmental issues facing Manitobans today Liz grew up in Fort William First Nation near Thunder Bay Ontario nestled against the shores and heaving surf of Lake Superior where one can stand and look upon the famous Sleeping Giant rock formation a near perfect relief of some fantastic and colossal man slumbering atop the cold black water From Thunder Bay you can travel a little south into Fort William and eventually into a blanket of boreal forest and stand at the foot of Mount McKay This is where the community holds their annual Read the rest of this story 1 Comment View All Stories Latest News Elders right all along scientists find huge caribou herd thought lost A vast herd of northern caribou that scientists feared had vanished from the face of the Earth has been found safe and sound pretty much where aboriginal elders said it would be all along The Beverly herd has not disappeared said John Nagy lead author of a recently published study that has biologists across the North relieved Those scientists were shaken by a 2009 survey on the traditional calving grounds of the Beverly herd which ranges over a huge swath of tundra from northern Saskatchewan to the Arctic coast A herd that once numbered 276 000 animals seemed to have completely disappeared the most dramatic and chilling example of a general decline in barren ground caribou But Nagy s research and consultation with the communities that live with the animals concludes differently caption id attachment 749 align alignnone width 582 caption Wild caribou roam the tundra

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Stories | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    s Aboriginal Community Collaborations the lessons she received from her grandmother as a child were what originally informed her outlook on life and her outlook on some pressing environmental issues facing Manitobans today Liz grew up in Fort William First Nation near Thunder Bay Ontario nestled against the shores and heaving surf of Lake Superior where one can stand and look upon the famous Sleeping Giant rock formation a near perfect relief of some fantastic and colossal man slumbering atop the cold black water From Thunder Bay you can travel a little south into Fort William and eventually into a blanket of boreal forest and stand at the foot of Mount McKay This is where the community holds their annual Read the rest of this story Posted in Stories 1 Comment Thomas Beaudry Thomas Beaudry grew up in the small Métis farming community of St Claude Manitoba He cited that although he always had an inherent respect for the land and the sustenance that it provided he developed an appreciation for the land based on the teachings of his Father and Grandfather Thomas explained that as a child he would take food from the garden if he was hungry but that his father had taught him to always give something back Thomas indicated that it could be something as simple as an offering of Tobacco that this very act brings about a sense of appreciation for the land This very simple teaching has followed Thomas throughout his life and reminds us to honor the sacred balance between man and nature As a youth Thomas moved to the city of Winnipeg He fell away from the environmental movement at that time and it was not Read the rest of this story Posted in Stories No Comments Dr Peggy Wilson and Dr Stan Wilson Land based Education With their entire professional lives in the field of education Drs Stan Wilson and Dr Peggy Wilson recognizing the need for the participation of more Aboriginal people in postgraduate education sought to introduce a Graduate Program in First Nations Education at the University of Alberta Ten Aboriginal PhD students and 22 Aboriginal Masters students graduated in the ten years the Wilsons taught the program all of their work stemming from an Indigenist Paradigm Despite mandatory retirement the two continued to work to deliver a unique Land Based Education program which would offer Aboriginal educators the chance to acquire a Master s degree without giving up their teaching positions The program effectively seeks to teach an alternate way of learning one that places a high value on Indigenous knowledge Not only is its relevancy as an educational Read the rest of this story Posted in Stories 6 Comments Chief Derek Nepinak Chief Derek Nepinak may be one of the youngest people to ever be elected as chief but at just 36 years old his anecdotal musings are wonderfully apt at forwarding complex cultural perspectives with a well seasoned ease Chief Nepinak took office as Chief of

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/category/stories (2016-02-09)
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  • » Manitoba’s Boreal Forest | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    600 First Nations A vast ecological treasure the boreal forest is home to an array of wildlife from fragile lichens and colourful songbirds to some of the largest populations of woodland caribou bears and wolves In addition to being rich habitat for a whole suite of species the boreal plays an important role in protecting the environment by filtering water storing carbon producing oxygen and other critical functions Unlike many other places in Canada the opportunity to preserve the ecological integrity of a large undisturbed region of boreal forest still exists in Manitoba To do so though requires a new way of thinking Boreal Forest Conservation Framework A coalition of conservation organizations First Nations and resource companies released a bold national vision and action plan for the conservation of Canada s boreal forest on December 1st 2003 The Boreal Forest Conservation Framework aims to conserve the cultural sustainable economic and natural values of the entire Canadian boreal region by protecting at least 50 of the region in a network of large interconnected protected areas and by supporting sustainable communities and world leading ecosystem based resource management principles in the remaining landscape The Boreal Forest Conservation Framework is a new and

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/boreal-forest (2016-02-09)
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  • » In the News | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    project aims to designate Manitoba s Bloodvein River and surrounding forests a UNESCO World Heritage Site caption id attachment 1648 align aligncenter width 486 caption These men who were born and raised near the Bloodvein River point to ancient pictographs that are part of their heritage Photo Hidehiro Otake caption Bald eagles soar over Manitoba s Bloodvein River and a forest of lichen draped Jack pines and mattress thick moss Piloted by grinning guides who shout at one another in Ojibwa our boats splash through a series of churning rapids en route to an ancient rock painting on a granite cliff This river and the forest surrounding it are at the core of a campaign to create a UNESCO World Heritage Site on approximately 4 3 million hectares of boreal forest straddling the Manitoba Ontario border about one third of the way up the eastern side of Lake Winnipeg The goals of the Read the rest of this story Posted in In the News No Comments David Suzuki Protecting the boreal wilderness known as Pimachiowin Aki According to a study published several years ago in the journal Science few places on our planet have been untouched by modern humans Satellite images taken from thousands of kilometres above the Earth reveal a world that has been irrevocably changed by human land use over the past few decades From Arctic tundra to primeval rainforest to arid desert our natural world has been fragmented by ever expanding towns and cities crisscrossed with roads transmission lines and pipelines and pockmarked by pump jacks flare stacks and other infrastructure used to drill frack and strip mine fossil fuels from the ground The need to supply food fibre fuels shelter and freshwater to more than six billion people is driving the wholesale conversion of forests wetlands grasslands and other ecosystems Researchers have discovered that farmland and pasture now rival natural forest cover in extent covering Read the rest of this story Posted in In the News No Comments PUBLIC CONSULTATIONS BEGIN ON BLOODVEIN LAND MANAGEMENT PLAN Manitoba Conservation advises the Bloodvein River First Nation s proposed Pimitotah Management Plan for its 3 482 square kilometre traditional land use area is going to the public consultation stage In December 2009 Bloodvein River s renewed interest in the Pimachiowin Aki World Heritage Project was announced The project is a partnership of the Bloodvein River Pauingassi Little Grand Rapids Poplar River and Pikangikum First Nations and the governments of Ontario and Manitoba Bloodvein River s plan outlines its vision of the protection and development activities to take place in its planning area A section of Atikaki Provincial Park which is covered by an existing management plan falls within Bloodvein River s traditional territory The proposed Pimitotah traditional use planning area regulation describes the boundaries of the proposed area and the proposed management plan that would apply to it In addition to establishing a permanent protected area the plan proposes community resource and commercial development zones A public meeting will

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/category/news (2016-02-09)
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  • » CPAWS at Poplar River Youth Camp | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    and enlightening trip to Weaver Lake in Poplar River First Nation s traditional territory Nestled within the intact wilderness on the east side of Lake Winnipeg the Poplar River community is working to protect 8000 square kilometers of their traditional lands and waters from industrial developments Poplar River First Nation is also part of an initiative with other boreal communities in the region to establish a 40 000 square kilometer World Heritage Site straddling the Manitoba Ontario border I was invited to be a role model at their annual youth camp designed to connect Aboriginal Youth to the natural landscape and learn traditional knowledge We were fortunate to speak with the 14 20 year olds about CPAWS conservation efforts and provide opportunities to get involved in caring for the planet through jobs and volunteering We all learned great lessons such as the history of the sweat lodge and we were lucky to participate in fun games and work our vocal cords with traditional Aboriginal songs While there we asked the kids how they felt about safeguarding the Boreal Forest Here s what they said View additional photos from Weaver Lake camp Learn More and Take Action Learn more about the

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/poplar-river (2016-02-09)
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  • » Links | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Stories Anne Marie Sam Trina Flett Ochiwasahow Our Responsibility Peigi Wilson Lessons from the Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation Links Be Sociable Share Tweet Aboriginal Ecotourism Aboriginal Tourism Canada Eastside Aboriginal Sustainable Tourism Inc Ecotourism Canada Indigenous Tourism Web Portal The Aboriginal

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  • » Anne Marie Sam | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    her home Anne was mentored in food gathering and preparation tasks that were age appropriate within the community of her greater family Her importance in the survival of their clan was understood and this instilled in her pride a sense of place and of her contribution to their society from a very early age The land is so sacred we are not supposed to talk about it We are being forced to talk about it now because we have to defend it We were always grounded and we knew who we were we were part of the Frog Clan This strong sense of self is particularly impressive when set against tragedy in her young life Before Anne was one year old her father died in a sawmill accident leaving Anne s 21 year old mother to raise her two young daughters along with the assistance of the extended family Time was spent on each family keyoh experiences that cemented family ties We were always grounded and we knew who we were we were part of the Frog Clan We were loved cherished and taught many life skills within our family Anna and her sister Liza on the Nation River As a young adult Anne pursued post secondary education first an undergraduate degree in history and then completed the course requirements for a master s degree in history and First Nations Studies Her energy for advocacy of the boreal forest and her Nak azdli culture and lands are astonishing She has three children two still very young a master s degree in progress and recently completed a term as a councilor on her band council Her attention is focused on a mine Shus Nadloh Mt Milligan which has been proposed for her own keyoh She is the Chair of the group First Nations Women Advocating Responsible Mining FNWARM an impressive gathering of female chiefs councillors and former chiefs who are working to reform the mining process in BC to balance the economics of mining developments with respect for First Nations rights and culture and the need for First Nations stewardship of their lands and traditional territories First Nations input prior to development promotion of First Nations land use plans and lobbying governments to restrict the ease with which exploration claims can be registered are three examples of their work The group s focus is on the social and cultural impacts of mining impacts borne heavily by women and children Healthy boreal forest ecosystems are crucial to their traditional practices so the environmental concerns easily join with cultural concerns Her work in boreal forest and mining advocacy takes Anne away from her family on average for a week out of every month When developments such as mines are proposed there are usually socio economic and environmental studies that take place contracted and paid for by the company proposing the work Anne s work with the Shus Nadloh mining proposal led to a different approach Studies were paid for by the mining company

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/660/anne-marie-sam (2016-02-09)
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  • » Trina Flett – Ochiwasahow- Our Responsibility | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    they can The Fisher River community has shouldered its responsibility to further protect the lands that surround their traditional home Together with Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society they have garnered tremendous support for a provincial park on the south west basin of Lake Winnipeg And it has paid off as the government of Manitoba has now committed to establishing the park And now Trina Flett would like the rest of us to support her community s efforts to make the Ochiwasahow Park a reality As the Manitoba government s Protected Area Initiative crawls at a snail s pace there is concern that a lack of political will may stall the process allowing the designation to lapse If we consider Trina s message of personal accountability to be of significance our responsibility is clear Support of the proposal to protect this large area of boreal forest can come in the way of letters to the government signing a postcard or becoming involved in a more active manner Why bother In our busy world of jobs and children and other responsibilities that impact our daily life why concern ourselves with something that is outside our realm of experience Because we have a choice and a responsibility Trina Flett lives that creed Her involvement with the environment and Aboriginal issues stretches back most of her life Awareness of her own personal impact on her surroundings led her first to support an Aboriginal environmental non profit organization But she knew that she could do more and that she needed more knowledge And so she became involved with the United Way learning the tools and strategies of that organization with the long range goal of providing First Nations peoples with the tools they need to achieve their potential for environmental stewardship Trina then became involved with the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society due to their involvement with the Ochiwasahow Park designation She appreciated the organization because she felt it gave a real voice to people involved with the process She now sits on the CPAWS fundraising development committee and continues to be impressed with their capacity to listen to the issues of stakeholders and respect their desires Not every person can have the passion and commitment that Trina exhibits for her cause but this dedicated woman would like everyone to understand that we can all make a choice for positive change You don t need a degree or a lot of money to take action she insists and believes that everyone has an obligation to know as much as they can about the environment and their own personal impact on it One person one question one choice at a time Trina would like you to consider your choices the next time you dump paint thinner down your drain What you choose to do without a thought makes its way down the river into Lake Winnipeg and to her home waters of Fisher Bay She wants you to think of small ways to lessen that impact

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/685/trina-flett-ochiwasahow-our-responsibility (2016-02-09)
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