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  • » The Boreal Forest: Our Land, Our Story, Our Responsibility » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail The Boreal Forest Our Land Our Story Our Responsibility To A Friend Email a copy of The Boreal Forest Our Land Our Story Our Responsibility to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/724/the-boreal-forest-our-land-our-story-our-responsibility/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » PROVINCE INVESTS $800,000 IN MOOSE POPULATION RESTORATION PLAN » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail PROVINCE INVESTS 800 000 IN MOOSE POPULATION RESTORATION PLAN To A Friend Email a copy of PROVINCE INVESTS 800 000 IN MOOSE POPULATION RESTORATION PLAN to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/721/province-invests-800000-in-moose-population-restoration-plan/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Lake Winnipeg Water Regulation » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Wilson Lessons from the Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Lake Winnipeg Water Regulation To A Friend Email a copy of Lake Winnipeg Water Regulation to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your Remark Friend s Name Separate

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/713/lake-winnipeg-water-regulation/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Stories | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    morning and enjoying the day Listen someone in the party insisted and the group fell silent There was a pause then a moment of realization Birds should have been singing Dumas says But there was nothing Not far from there they knew logging companies were operating Even though they could not hear the machines or see the clearcuts from where they were the effects were obvious It s not just the people who get displaced William tells me The animals the fish even the birds They all get displaced as they lose the resource area they need to survive As further evidence to this he tells me Read the rest of this story Posted in Stories 1 Comment Marla Robson I want to get people interested in supporting boreal conservation because it is important for our future our cultures and our existence I would like to see people recognize their part take responsibility have humility and show their appreciation by using less One of my first memories is an experience of senses It takes place in Norway House Manitoba in the heart of the boreal I kept my eyes shut tight as I listened intensely to all the sounds surrounding me I heard the sound of trees bending against the wind giving flexing and coming back to stand tall and straight I heard the many songbirds which were dependent on those very trees for shelter and protection In the far distance I could hear the lake lapping against rocky shores All the while my heart and cheek pressed against Read the rest of this story Posted in Stories 1 Comment Sophia Bittern Rabliauskas In 2002 when I was working as the assistant director for the Wilderness Committee s Manitoba office the east side of Lake Winnipeg had already been established as an important battleground for competing interests Industry government First Nations environmentalists and other non profits anted in with funded efforts and dedicated personnel to meet with the other players to discuss weigh and vie for their various interests and slog through the process of deciding the fate of one of the largest remaining tracts in intact boreal forest left on Earth It was to be a protracted and bureaucratic affair that could last decades Between 2002 and 2004 I had been made increasingly aware of the accomplishments of a small community on the east side of Lake Winnipeg that would eventually garner international attention Home to roughly 1300 Anishinabek people Read the rest of this story Posted in Stories 2 Comments John Cutfeet Indigenous people in Canada should be able to say no to development activities that occur on their traditional territories said a Northern Ontario First Nation man who has seen leadership in his community thrown in jail for opposing mining exploration on their lands without consultation Our people have a right to be consulted but not the right to say no said John Cutfeet a spokesperson for Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug KI First Nation How is consultation meaningful if

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/category/stories/page/4 (2016-02-09)
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  • » Randy Kapashesit | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    on a non consumptive model of economic activity and models traditional Indigenous values of respect for the earth in a modern setting In 1975 with the James Bay and Northern Flood Agreement Kapashesit explained how his community fell through the cracks in the wake of a lands claim settlement The settlement aimed to serve specific First Nations bands on the Quebec side of the nearby border extinguishing native rights titles and interests in exchange for programs and services such as education and healthcare However the settlement also affected those residing across the Ontario border in the communities of Moosonee and Moose Factory While these communities have historical genealogical ties to the affected Quebec bands they are no longer connected to the Quebec community in a formal or practical sense While the rights of the future MoCreebec people to make further claims were taken away with the agreement because of their location the Ontario residents have no access to the social services provided Kapashesit explained Founded in 1980 the MoCreebec Council works to serve First Nations people in the Moosonee Moose Factory region who have been disenfranchised by this grave bureaucratic oversight The Council which is not associated with any reserve or band is recognized by other Indigenous groups However it is not recognized by the Indian Act and receives no funding from the Ontario government Anything we ve done we ve done on our own Kapashesit said Kapashesit began his work with the Council as a student The absence of a paycheque for many years didn t deter Kapashesit from putting his all into the job I really felt like for me the commitment to be here was that you know this was really connected to me personally in terms of my own identity For the last 45 years the Moosonee Moose Factory area has been a tourist destination for the Polar Bear Express a train that takes tourists on day trips to the area during the summer season said Kapashesit As the oldest English settlement in Ontario Moose Factory has long been a historical attraction Still with the Polar Bear Express popularity waning and little for tourists to spend their money on during the short stay the community decided to develop a more viable tourist attraction on their own terms in keeping with traditional values Noticing a fast growing market for ecotourism the community began to consider the creation of an Ecolodge as an overnight destination Engaging in such an endeavor was not something the community took lightly Kapashesit said Preparation for this new venture included doing an inventory of who we are as a people Part of that was to try to address and overcome some of the issues that were present in this community Attracting people in the world market meant inviting strangers into their community a daunting thought for many If you re going to be inviting the world to come and visit you you better be prepared for all kinds of people to show up

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/262/randy-kapashesit (2016-02-09)
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  • » Christi Belcourt | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Christi explains It is within traditional Anishnaabeg territory La Cloche from the French bell gets its name from Sinmedwe ek sounding rock in Anishnaabemowin Ojibway Just down the road from Willisville Mountain is Dreamer s Rock it is a sacred place that was used for fasting Portrayed by artists and photographers including the Group of Seven Christi along with 44 other artists will join the list of those influenced by the La Cloche mountain range Called the Willisville Mountain Project www willisvillemountain com participating artists showcase the beauty and importance of the area and bring awareness to the mining potential of the mountain Vale Inco owns the mining rights to Willisville Mountain Vale Inco has not publicly announced that they are going to mine Willisville Mountain but they have acknowledged that this is why they retain the mining rights to it The artists who participated in the project were not necessarily aware of this fact before they created their art We wanted to let them create art that was not influenced by a negative reaction to something The result was 65 pieces of art that were personal yet a common thread among them was respect of the place the mountain the environment and the spirit of the rock Everything is wholly dependent upon the plant world the insects the animals and us Human beings are the weakest in Creation because we need everything else to survive I have faith in our ability as human beings to change things The Earth is very powerful and has amazing regenerative powers so I remain hopeful about the future It s important that we continue to teach and learn our traditional ways and our ceremonies and protocols are very important because the protocols we observe are all about being in balance with nature Realizing the continued health of the boreal forest is being threatened by industrial activities such as clear cut logging hydro development and mining Christi laments I have cried many times when coming across clear cut areas It is the rape of Mother Earth and to see our Mother treated so disrespectfully well there just are no words I can use to express how deeply that hurts She is optimistic nevertheless adding I have faith in our ability as human beings to change things The Earth is very powerful and has amazing regenerative powers so I remain hopeful about the future It s important that we continue to teach and learn our traditional ways and our ceremonies and protocols are very important because the protocols we observe eg tobacco first never take more than you will use don t over harvest thank the animals and plants etc are all about being in balance with nature We need to share these principles not just with our own youth but with non Aboriginal youth as well Branching out to other forms of expression Christi is the author of Medicines To Help Us a book based on her study identification stories and medicinal uses of

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/230/christi-belcourt (2016-02-09)
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  • » Fred Stevens – Sustainable Harvest – Balance | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    reveals that logging corporation Louisiana Pacific s harvesting practices have altered the boreal forest landscape forcing out wildlife and species that once thrived there There is regeneration he says but the species composition has to adjust to the barren landscape caused by clear cutting effectively reducing some species ability to compete for the sunlight and moisture and increasing the invasion of others Medicines that once grew in an area may not grow back after it has been clear cut Similarly wild berries are choked out by the rapid growth of underbrush It is all machinery now claiming to be up to environmental standards I don t know how they can say that After an area is logged it looks like the land is getting ready to be farmed Clear cutting unlike damage from a forest fire destroys the soil including the fungi and other soil bacteria that feed the forest s nutrient and water system The network of forest roads also affect soils by compacting and rutting the landscape increasing soil erosion which adds to the nutrients in nearby waterways These nutrients alter the aquatic ecosystem enabling the excessive development of algae and aquatic plants which when broken down consume the oxygen in the water species need to survive Clear cut logging also removes the organic material off site while fires leave organic matter on site effectively rebuilding the soil required for regeneration after such a disturbance It has been argued that clear cut logging must continue in order to maintain employment Understanding the need for jobs in the north Fred puts the issue into perspective It is all machinery now claiming to be up to environmental standards I don t know how they can say that After an area is logged it looks like the land is getting ready

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/223/fred-stevens (2016-02-09)
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  • » Mike Pierre – Transformation as Creation | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Mike was 25 years old and attending university that was life changing In the spring of 1997 like the flood water that had surmounted the prairies Mike was overtaken by a renewal that would affect him profoundly While in premedical studies Mike chose to partake in four weeks of health and Aboriginal courses Every day he participated in sharing circles and learnt traditional teachings and healing Finding a community of belonging for the first time everything finally started to have meaning Mike began to dream and the visions were prophesies that further evoked a life path of a higher order A Name in the Service of Creation Mike was given the name Mashkodebizhiki Inini Buffalo Spirit Man The name one receives acts as a governing framework where each name reminds us of our strengths weaknesses and of our role of service to the people For Buffalo Spirit Man this meant a service to respect all Creation things alike and unalike The challenge that ensued was clear you cannot give what you do not have Buffalo Spirit Man immersed himself in the freedom his new found release provided He became a Skaabé a worker or helper at ceremonies including the Sun Dance a very powerful and sacred ceremony Occurring during the summer months the Sun Dance tests and strengthens one s faith mind body and spirit Fasting for four days and nights as a means to demonstrate their worth to the spirit world and earn what they are asking for dancers seek guidance and healing from the ceremony As Buffalo Spirit Man s roles transformed over time from dancer to fire keeper to dragger of buffalo skulls piercer and whip he received another name Gi Mangizid Ma iingan Club Foot Wolf With it came a lot of responsibility Club Foot Wolf reveals I said if I got the help I needed to heal I would work for the Creator s children I now have to live up to my end There is a shared responsibility as well as equality among pack members All members work together each with a role that contributes to the well being of the group When one s service is to all Creation present and future your purpose must take into account the health and sustainability of the earth s life support systems Any thought towards the well being of all creatures and realizing the interconnected web of life it provides ties one to their actions or inactions The teacher of this lesson in humility is the wolf Each member of the wolf pack has a role There are caregivers protectors There is a shared responsibility as well as equality among pack members All members work together each with a role that contributes to the well being of the group Alone a wolf will not survive as a collective every wolf receives the benefits of the other gifts As a human family we need to do that to get through these difficult times explains Club Foot Wolf

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/219/mike-pierre-transformation-as-creation (2016-02-09)
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