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  • » Here We Go Again – An Interview with William Young | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    time spent with his family especially with his grandfather former Chief Fred Green His grandfather used to share stories with him about hunting fishing and living off the land But when William was about 11 or 12 years old his grandfather issued an ominous warning to beware of encroaching industrialization William knew to trust his grandfather but he would have to wait some time for the meaning of his grandfather s words to be revealed Young says when the forestry company Tembec began operating near his community harvesting trees in the boreal forest that his community depended on for their livelihoods his grandfather s message was clear industrialization would only exacerbate the community s challenges A tide of sweeping changes had already begun to alter the community Roads were attached to the community like giant arteries that pumped in the influence of the urban centers and a combination of boycotts on the fur trade and implementation of welfare programs served to debase Bloodvein s economic foundation and make community members impoverished and dependent on the government With these events the people slowly lost their cultural values and connections with the land and a disorienting and damaging cycle had been given momentum The general public from urban areas wanting to run the hydro line through our communities should come here and see what little economic base there is says Young who for the last 15 years or so has been developing a business that aims to capitalize on the natural beauty of the boreal forest on the east side of Lake Winnipeg His business Bloodvein River Lodge offers packages for clients to enjoy traditional activities like fishing canoeing and going on guided tours But this is no regular fishing lodge Young also uses the time with his clients as an opportunity to teach traditional Ojibway values share stories and to talk about local First Nation history Many people who come here from the United States and from other places are surprised to hear how bad it is for our community says Young who has made it his personal mission to use education as a tool to cope with a wide range of issues and improve conditions in his community In the case of swine flu he and other community members have responded with educational newsletters information broadcasts on the local radio station and community health programs To improve economic conditions William Young utilizes opportunities generated by his business to speak to people from outside the community and serves as the Chairman of EAST Inc an economic development initiative established to support the development and expansion of new and existing Aboriginal tourism businesses in the boreal forests on the east side of Lake Winnipeg With the financial support of the department of Culture Heritage and Tourism and technical support of the Manitoba Tourism Secretariat the initiative enables First Nations on the east side of Lake Winnipeg to enter one of the fastest growing industries in the world eco tourism The east side

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/209/here-we-go-again-an-interview-with-william-young (2016-02-09)
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  • » Fisher River Cree Nation: Guardians of Mother Earth | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    be managed jointly by FRCN and the province To date the process to create the park appears stalled Protecting the Ochiwasahow area makes sense ecologically economically and culturally The area is home to a variety of animals birds fish and plants Some of this wildlife is endangered and the plants rare The limestone caves here are home to thousands of hibernating bats The area acts as a filter for the water and the boreal forest is a supplier of oxygen for the world Ochiwasahow supports traditional pursuits such as gathering and trapping It also supports fishing the main economic activity of the area Looking to the future Fisher River Cree Nation sees cultural and eco tourism as sustainable environmentally responsible commercial ventures Looking to the future Fisher River Cree Nation sees cultural and eco tourism as sustainable environmentally responsible commercial ventures Aboriginal elders tell us that Mother Nature must be respected We must be her guardians This is a role Fisher River Cree Nation is encouraging all Manitobans to take on with the creation of Ochiwasahow Provincial Park Aboriginal culture includes that what there is should be shared whether it is food on your table money in your pocket or land under your feet It is essential for us to share what Mother Earth has provided Fisher River Cree Nation hopes to share the Ochiwasahow area with the rest of Manitoba Canada and the world Aboriginal elders tell us that Mother Nature must be respected We must be her guardians This is a role Fisher River Cree Nation is encouraging all Manitobans to take on with the creation of Ochiwasahow Provincial Park Protecting the Ochiwasahow area makes sense for everyone 10 000 letters were sent from Manitobans to the province in support of the Ochiwasahow Provincial Park Politicians from four

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/147/fisher-river-cree-nation-guardians-of-mother-earth (2016-02-09)
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  • » Ron Campbell | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Ron would set out to develop his survival and traditional skills passed down to him from his family Often I would leave in the early mornings alone or with friends to enjoy what the boreal forest offered Usually I did not return until the sun was setting towards the west To this day my children will ask me Dad when will you be home from hunting I would jokingly answer When the sun sets and hits the trees to the west This is the way I lived To this day I respect the environment I live in and do what I can to teach my children and others the same values I have learned A Dedication to Natural Resources and Conservation Ron has had a detailed resume since childhood illustrating his dedication to Manitoba s natural resources and environment He is involved in all aspects of natural resource management including wildlife fisheries and forestry As a teenager Ron started working with his uncles as a commercial fisherman and later in forestry as a faller and skidder operator at Moose Lake loggers Ron worked there for roughly five years In 1983 an opportunity to work for the Manitoba Government came through the Northern Flood Agreement This is the way I lived To this day I respect the environment I live in and do what I can to teach my children and others the same values I have learned Too much emphasis is placed on strictly scientific evaluations we need to implement Traditional knowledge as a component with Western knowledge in natural resource management Ron worked in his community as a Natural Resources Management Assistant for 17 years Like many other jobs he set personal goals held aspirations and faced roadblocks along the way In 1999 Ron was granted a two year leave of absence to pursue a career in Natural Resource Management Technology Ron graduated from University College of the North in 2001 with a diploma Ron accepted employment with the Manitoba Government as a Natural Resource Technician He has since been promoted to Regional Fisheries Technician with Manitoba Water Stewardship Fisheries In 2005 Ron successfully completed a two year Aboriginal Management Development Program offered through the Civil Service Commission in Winnipeg Ron has also been actively involved in the monitoring program for lake sturgeon in the Saskatchewan River This program enables him to utilize various methodologies such as capture and recapture techniques to determine the current population and sustainability of Lake Sturgeon for domestic sport and commercial use Currently Ron is working on a thesis examining morphometric analysis and relationships of lake sturgeon populations in the Saskatchewan River as part of a reclassification process aimed to promote him a Biologist II designation Traditional Ecological Knowledge and the Future of the Environment Given Ron s unique education and experience he is well positioned to understand a convergence of traditional and modern approaches is necessary to solving today s environmental challenges including those of our boreal forests He explains A combination of

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/127/ron-campbell (2016-02-09)
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  • » Interview with Waubgeshig Rice | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    quickly diminishes the claim by recounting the area s natural splendor Wasauking is located on an island a big rock basically I pretty much grew up right on the water I took it for granted as a kid not really appreciating it until I left Waub is referring to when he left home in 1996 through a Rotary Club International program that brought him to Germany a place he called home for some time Germany was totally different than the Rez says Rice with a chuckle But while in Germany Rice discovered that the Germans welcomed him with open arms and were intrigued by his ethnicity Upon returning to Canada Rice enrolled in Ryerson University eventually graduating with a BA in journalism in 2002 He began his broadcasting career working for the Weather Network in 2003 and then in 2006 was picked up by the CBC in Winnipeg I come from the bush so I don t exactly want to see it mowed down to have a bunch of power lines through it Projects like these proposed Fisher Bay provincial park are great as they promote traditional ways of life and uses of the land It s best if a community can generate economic benefit without ruining what s there After being away from home for so many years it is clear how his past informs his current worldview When he talks about the boreal forest on the east side of Lake Winnipeg for instance it is clear that he is in a headspace that fully appreciates the natural world Our natural resources are our most precious says Rice I come from the bush so I don t exactly want to see it mowed down to have a bunch of power lines through it On that note Rice adds that

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/115/interview-with-waubgeshig-rice (2016-02-09)
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  • » JP Gladu | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    including industry First Nations and environmental groups which make up the Boreal Leadership Council These partners subscribe to a collective boreal vision to create new on the ground solutions for boreal forest conservation The goal of the framework is to protect at least 50 per cent of the boreal forest and to sustainably develop the rest ensuring the perpetual integrity of the boreal and its ecosystems The challenge in the past is that development has gone ahead of conservation so you have all this development happening in the boreal forest with conservation being an afterthought explains JP What you re left with are islands of protected areas which aren t necessarily sustainable because they re too small not interconnected or development on the perimeter has significantly affected them The boreal forest in Canada is one of the largest remaining forest ecosystems in the world It is home to diverse wildlife and necessary ecosystem functions including climate regulation and water purification The majority of people that reside in the boreal regions of Canada are First Nations that have lived and depended on the land for millennia The boreal and its resources remain necessary to Aboriginal communities many of which still practice traditional livelihoods In a perfect world in my mind First Nations would be the drivers behind land use planning and decision making in their backyards The reason this needs to happen is because and you can ask First Nations People do you think somebody s going to jeopardize their children s future and their children s children s future by making poor decisions today in their backyard Instead First Nations have had to fight for a say in the development of their traditional lands and have often lost to the interests of large scale industrial development Influencing government and policy decision makers to adopt policies that incorporate the inclusion of First Nations terminology values and ways of thinking is an essential element in the proper management of the boreal forest Though as the case suggests with First Nations across Canada having a government that is open and responsive to the views of a nation wanting to protect its land outside of existing legislation is difficult the current designations that exist out there aren t open enough to take in the perception or the concepts of what First Nations think protected areas are we don t have that in our vocabulary it s just a way of being So the challenges are to find something in between Recently government announcements by Premier s Dalton McGuinty of Ontario and Quebec s Jean Charest support the boreal forest conservation s framework to protect at least 50 percent of the boreal forest Stating a commitment to protect half of their northern boreal regions from large scale development Ontario and Quebec have signified that they recognize the importance in protecting large wilderness Their leadership has the potential to develop new solutions in resource management but fundamental to the success of this process is that decision

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/91/jp-gladu (2016-02-09)
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  • » Clayton Thomas-Müller | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    But his heart remains in his native Pukatawagan A predominantly fishing community of almost 1 500 Pukatawagan is located on the 56th parallel by the Pas Manitoba There re still a lot of folks living off the land up there Thomas Müller said Where I come from is the centre of Turtle Island and the Boreal The community is embroiled in battles with Manitoba Hydro and clear cut logging industries The companies developments are rapidly encroaching on Pukatawagan s territory the boreal forest the Churchill River and its broader watershed which provide sustenance to many local people To better help his own community fight for boreal forest conservation and other First Nations facing natural destruction Thomas Müller became an environmental justice activist There are a lot of young leaders stepping out in our community he said Thomas Müller is now the Canadian Indigenous Tar Sands Campaign CITSC organizer for the Indigenous Environmental Network IEN a North American environmental justice organization battling for the protection of indigenous lands and rights Voted as one of top 30 under 30 activists in the United States by the alternative publication Utne Magazine Thomas Müller is anything but uninspired My organization has been working to protect Mother Earth he said Our work is focused on ensuring our communities are speaking for themselves that policy changes are connected to First Nations and their needs so that solutions don t exacerbate the problems First Nations are currently facing IEN receives no government funding but is financed completely by private donors and foundations As part of his work with IEN on environmental justice gatherings Thomas Müller has connected youth involved in gang life in the city with boreal forest conservation through retreats in the forest Aboriginal youth involvement in boreal conservation takes on a whole new meaning that

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/86/clayton-thomas-muller (2016-02-09)
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  • » Medicine Wheel Teachings » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Peigi Wilson Lessons from the Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Medicine Wheel Teachings To A Friend Email a copy of Medicine Wheel Teachings to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your Remark Friend s Name Separate multiple

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/526/medicine-wheel-teachings/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Traditional Knowledge Key in Planning for the Future » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Traditional Knowledge Key in Planning for the Future To A Friend Email a copy of Traditional Knowledge Key in Planning for the Future to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your Remark

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/517/traditional-knowledge-key-in-planning-for-the-future/email/ (2016-02-09)
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