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  • » Kailee Carr » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Responsibility Peigi Wilson Lessons from the Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Kailee Carr To A Friend Email a copy of Kailee Carr to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your Remark Friend s Name Separate multiple entries

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/286/kailee-carr/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Interview with Dan Thomas » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Wilson Lessons from the Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Interview with Dan Thomas To A Friend Email a copy of Interview with Dan Thomas to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your Remark Friend s Name Separate

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/276/interview-with-dan-thomas/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » In the News | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    and Aboriginal and Northern Affairs Minister Eric Robinson This disgraceful and sad chapter in Manitoba history must be acknowledged While the federal government of the time was responsible for the relocation others including provincial officials contributed to the tragedy said Robinson With this apology we pledge to never forget the tremendous suffering initiated over 50 years ago that continues in so many ways to this day The Province of Manitoba accepts responsibility for erroneous information that validated the relocation and commits to moving forward in a Read the rest of this story Posted in In the News 1 Comment Colourful lake jewel of new park The provincial government is inviting Manitobans to participate in the creation of a new provincial park The park would be in north central Manitoba at Little Limestone Lake a 15 kilometre body of water north of Grand Rapids The lake is in a limestone region with underground drainage and many cavities and passages caused by dissolution of the rock It is referred to as a marl lake since it changes colour when calcite precipitates in the water as the lake s temperature rises in summer Protecting one of the most amazing examples of a marl lake in the world is an important legacy we can leave for future generations Conservation Minister Bill Blaikie said Because of its rare geography Little Limestone Lake stands out among Manitoba lakes for its annual cycle of magnificent colour changes Ron Thiessen executive director for the Manitoban branch of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society said the current park reserve boundary is Read the rest of this story Posted in In the News No Comments Park visitors to try hands at research Volunteers to help study vegetation wildlife RIDING MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK The three woman boat crew plies the high seas of Clear Lake in glorious sunshine chasing northern pike hard wired with transmitters and pulling up creels of slimy sculpin For these summer students employed by the wildlife lab at Riding Mountain National Park it s a dirty job but someone s gotta do it Now that someone could be you The national park is launching a citizen scientist program where ordinary Joes and Josephines can join everything from this summer s archeological dig at the park s former POW camp to following transmitter clad pike by boat using a hand held antenna For years summer students have lined up for jobs to augment the wildlife lab s field work The voluntary citizen scientist program hopes to expand that labour force further The park gave the Free Press a tour of some research projects citizen scientists will be recruited for The first ones started this Read the rest of this story Posted in In the News No Comments CREATION OF LITTLE LIMESTONE LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK WOULD PROTECT AMAZING MARL LAKE BLAIKIE Public Consultations Underway Until Aug 31 A new provincial park at Little Limestone Lake in north central Manitoba is being proposed and the public is invited to have

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/category/news/page/4 (2016-02-09)
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  • » PROVINCE OF MANITOBA, SCIENTISTS, FIRST NATIONS COMMUNITIES TO FOCUS ON PROTECTING CARIBOU | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    exchanged in Winnipeg at this conference will help preserve caribou in Manitoba in North America and around the world said Blaikie Caribou are an iconic Canadian species whose continuing existence is intimately tied to the health of the environment and other animals The conference which is held every two years is being funded with 10 000 from Manitoba Conservation and 17 000 from Manitoba Hydro in addition to other sponsors The event titled Sustaining Caribou and Their Landscapes Knowledge to Action will be held at the Fairmont Hotel in Winnipeg Participants are coming from all over North America and several European nations and will include Aboriginal elders and community members caribou biologists staff from government departments and non government agencies researchers and students Our First Nations have a unique heritage and relationship with caribou said Blaikie Their experiences viewpoints and traditional knowledge will help guide effective management of the species In Manitoba there are three types of caribou The barren ground herd is located in the far north the coastal herd is along the Hudson Bay in Manitoba and the boreal woodland caribou is located in central regions of the province In Canada boreal woodland caribou are listed as threatened under the federal Species at Risk Act Manitoba has listed this caribou as threatened under its Endangered Species Act We re pleased that Manitoba is hosting this important gathering of caribou scientists and traditional knowledge holders said Ron Thiessen executive director of the Manitoba chapter of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society CPAWS It s our hope that this meeting of the minds will expedite efforts to secure a healthy future for threatened woodland caribou populations and their vast boreal habitats in Manitoba and across North America Under the direction of the Eastern Manitoba Woodland Caribou Advisory Committee the Manitoba

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/642/province-of-manitoba-scientists-first-nations-communities-to-focus-on-protecting-caribou (2016-02-09)
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  • » Environmental groups give Manitoba an award | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation Home Environmental groups give Manitoba an award Comment on this Story Email This Story Environmental groups give Manitoba an award October 25th 2010 Today 10 leading environmental groups gave the Manitoba government and Indigenous partners on the east side of Lake Winnipeg an award for their work to promote the creation of an UNESCO world heritage site in this spectacular tract of

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/718/environmental-groups-give-manitoba-an-award (2016-02-09)
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  • » Canada’s biodiversity under attack, federal-provincial report finds | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    over 20 per cent of the water bodies sampled including some of the Great Lakes where 20 years ago regulations successfully reduced nutrient inputs This time causes are more complex and solutions will likely be more difficult It says lakes affected by acid rain have been slow to recover even though acidifying air emissions have been reduced And invasive non native species have reached critical levels in the Great Lakes and elsewhere The report is billed as the first assessment of Canada s biodiversity from an ecosystem perspective It was prepared for the federal provincial and territorial governments for the 2010 International Year of Biodiversity and is based on technical reports prepared by more than 500 experts across the country The news is not all bad Over half of Canada s landscape remains intact and relatively free from human infrastructure says the executive summary Although much is in the more remote North this also includes large tracts of boreal forest and coastal temperate rainforest Canada maintains commercial and recreational freshwater and marine fisheries of significant economic and cultural importance It also notes that some marine mammal populations are recovering from past overharvesting and that contaminants such as DDT and PCBs are declining in wildlife But far more of the arrows in the report point to downward trends and ecosystems that are of concern or are impaired Among the 22 key findings of the biodiversity report Human impact Humans now dominate most ecosystems on Earth In Canada with more wilderness than most countries this dominance is not always obvious but even in remote areas human influence is increasingly apparent Invasive species Non native species are destroying valuable wetland and grassland habitat invading marine intertidal areas and dominate the Great Lakes Economic and ecological losses caused have been estimated at 5 7 billion annually in the Great Lakes alone Wildlife diseases caused by non native pathogens such as West Nile virus have killed thousands of birds and potentially threaten many different wildlife species Species at risk Twenty per cent of frogs toads and salamanders are considered at risk of extinction in Canada Declines of several amphibian populations since the mid 1990s have been documented in the Great Lakes Basin and the St Lawrence River corridor In Canada 18 per cent of freshwater fish are listed as endangered or threatened The number of endangered or threatened fish species has been increasing since the 1980s The causes of declines vary across the country and include invasive non native species habitat loss degradation and fragmentation overharvesting pollution and climate change Since the 1970s birds of grassland and other open habitats lost over 40 per cent of their populations Half of the 35 shorebird species assessed in 2000 showed decline Trends for seabirds are mixed but the number of populations in decline has increased since the 1980s Waterfowl are generally healthy although some species are in decline Most northern caribou herds are declining some precipitously Causes are not well understood and might include natural population cycles

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/640/canadas-biodiversity-under-attack-federal-provincial-report-finds (2016-02-09)
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  • » Province stalling on designating wilderness park: Fisher River chief | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    moose fox eagles songbirds ducks and a variety of rare and endangered species such as the Piping Plover The picturesque area is blessed with treed shorelines long sandy beaches large islands covered with old growth forests and reefs The quest to establish the park that would be four times the size of Winnipeg is part of FRCN s journey to protect nature culture and economic opportunity The release states More than 14 000 Manitobans many local communities and politicians of all stripes have sent letters of support to establish the park now with the ecologically appropriate boundaries requested by FRCN and CPAWS Manitoba Conservation Minister Bill Blaikie himself has written a letter to his own government stating that he supports this Official supporters of establishing Fisher Bay park In addition the province s First Nation and Stakeholder comments review states The majority of comments received during the review process support the concept of creating a new provincial park in the Fisher Bay area Many review meeting participants recognized that a provincial park designation would help protect the region s natural landscape features and values There has never been more support for creating a park in Manitoba said Ron Thiessen Executive Director of the CPAWS Manitoba chapter It s time to get the job done FRCN and CPAWS are asking citizens to let the Manitoba government know how they feel about honouring its commitment to establishing the park this October Individuals can share their opinions by emailing parksystem gov mb ca The official deadline for comments is today but the province will likely accept weekend submissions Located two hours north of Winnipeg the Fisher Bay region is home to wildlife such as bears moose fox eagles songbirds ducks and a variety of rare and endangered species such as the Piping Plover

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/631/province-stalling-on-designating-wilderness-park-fisher-river-chief (2016-02-09)
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  • » etters to the Editor: Boreal wilderness | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation Home etters to the Editor Boreal wilderness Comment on this Story Email This Story etters to the Editor Boreal wilderness October 7th 2010 By ROGER RITSEMA Source Winnipeg Free Press Letters to the Editor Re Province accused of dragging its feet on wilderness park Oct 2 The Manitoba government s request to delay the designation of a provincial park in Fisher Bay is unacceptable on several grounds Environmentally speaking Fisher Bay is a healthy boreal wilderness many rare and threatened species make it their home Only a small part approximately seven per cent of Manitoba is permanently protected from industrial developments This is woefully inadequate to ensure healthy ecosystems Politically speaking there has been a groundswell of support for this park Finally and in a somewhat broader context given the state of Lake Winnipeg s health the government should be progressing on protecting land and water in its basin and watershed for the future well being of the lake Establishing the Fisher Bay park would help fulfil this objective ROGER RITSEMA Winnipeg Be Sociable Share Tweet You can follow any responses

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/629/etters-to-the-editor-boreal-wilderness (2016-02-09)
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