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  • » Garry Raven: Eastside Lake Winnipeg » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Lessons from the Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Garry Raven Eastside Lake Winnipeg To A Friend Email a copy of Garry Raven Eastside Lake Winnipeg to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your Remark Friend s Name

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/52/garry-raven-eastside-lake-winnipeg/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » In the News | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Pikangikum First Nation in Ontario with support from Ontario and Manitoba s governments The UNESCO designation would protect 40 000 square kilometres of forest rivers and traditional territories Our people have lived here for thousands of years and without that land they wouldn t have been able to survive said Sophia Rabliausku who wants the land protected under the UNESCO designation Hidehiro Otake a freelance photographer from Japan travelled to the area to capture images of the wild wolf because the animal is extinct in his homeland It s very important so this Read the rest of this story Posted in In the News No Comments East side dollars It is important to note that a World Heritage site on the east side of Lake Winnipeg will be a huge economic boost for Manitoba If Bipole III is constructed through the east side we severely reduce our chance of receiving this internationally prestigious designation and consequently the best free marketing available for promoting eco and cultural tourism two of the fastest growing industries in the world I point to recent examples UNESCO took the severe step of removing the World Heritage Site designation from Germany s Dresden Elbe River Valley in 2009 after construction began on a four lane bridge through the heart of the area In 2009 the government of Newfoundland and Labrador reversed its decision to construct a Bipole through Gross Morne National Park a UNESCO World Heritage Site because they were informed that doing so could jeopardize the park s UNESCO World Heritage Site designation In the spring of 2010 the B C Read the rest of this story Posted in In the News No Comments Amnesty International criticizes Canada s treatment of aboriginals TORONTO Amnesty International s annual report sharply criticizes Canada in a number of areas including aboriginal rights and the use of security certificates to detain terror suspects The report says Canada failed to ensure aboriginal rights when issuing licences for mining logging and oil and gas exploration The annual report accuses Ottawa of continuing to make baseless claims that the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples does not apply in Canada The two pages spotlighting Canada also note the violence against aboriginal women and the lack of a national plan to address it Oil and gas developments in northern Alberta come under sharp criticism as continuing without the consent of the Lubicon Cree who are in poor health and living in poverty People detained under security certificates continue to be denied access to the evidence used against them it states The report makes note of the Afghan detainee controversy and that Omar Khadr remains Read the rest of this story Posted in In the News No Comments Tory Leader Hugh McFadyen Gets A Message No East Side BiPole McFadyen holds a CD containing almost 10 000 letters from concerned international citizensToday Manitoba Tory leader Hugh McFadyen got a message from nearly 10 000 international supporters of the proposed UNESCO World Heritage

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/category/news/page/5 (2016-02-09)
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  • » Mining, logging halt urged to help caribou recover | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    fire burned about 55 000 hectares north of Cranberry Portage and destroyed a large part of the Kississing Naosap caribou herd s range Wilderness Committee spokesman Eric Reder said Friday The herd is one of three in Manitoba that the province has categorized as high risk due to ongoing or imminent development activities Reder and Manitoba Wildlands spokeswoman Gaile Whelan Enns said the province has to limit development in the area to allow the caribou time to find a new area to feed and calve The caribou aren t going to be able to live in a forest fire area Reder said They have to go somewhere The question is where do they go Reder said the pause in development including hydroelectric development must be long enough to cover the year long cycle of caribou activities fall breeding winter forage spring migration and summer calving At the end of the summer we should get an idea of recruitment meaning how many calves have survived Reder said Many animals in the herd have been collared by biologists to track their movement Reder and Whelan Enns said by the end of next summer officials should know where the animals have re located Whelan Enns said the province also needs to update its management plan for Grass River Provincial Park to include protecting natural habitat from logging mining and hydro development It was designated as a park in the mid 1960s Grass River Provincial Park is not protected Whelan Enns said The bottom line is there is no protected habitat and now there s 55 000 hectares of significant habitat burned Liberal Leader Jon Gerrard said Conservation Minister Bill Blaikie should put in place an action plan to protect not only the Kississing Naosap herd but all caribou in the province Blaikie is

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/608/mining-logging-halt-urged-to-help-caribou-recover (2016-02-09)
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  • » Scientists’ forecast: much more of the same; a century of heat, fires, floods | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Moscow temperatures topping 100 degrees Fahrenheit 37 8 degrees C for the first time Russia s drought has sparked hundreds of wildfires in forests and dried peat bogs blanketing Moscow with a toxic smog that finally lifted Thursday after six days The Russian capital s death rate doubled to 700 people a day at one point The drought reduced the wheat harvest by more than one third The 2007 IPCC report predicted a doubling of disastrous droughts in Russia this century and cited studies foreseeing catastrophic fires during dry years It also said Russia would suffer large crop losses PAKISTAN The heaviest monsoon rains on record 12 inches 300 millimeters in one 36 hour period have sent rivers rampaging over huge swaths of countryside flooding thousands of villages It has left 14 million Pakistanis homeless or otherwise affected and killed 1 500 The government calls it the worst natural disaster in the nation s history A warmer atmosphere can hold and discharge more water The 2007 IPCC report said rains have grown heavier for 40 years over north Pakistan and predicted greater flooding this century in south Asia s monsoon region CHINA China is witnessing its worst floods in decades the WMO says particularly in the northwest province of Gansu There floods and landslides last weekend killed at least 1 100 people and left more than 600 missing feared swept away or buried beneath mud and debris The IPCC reported in 2007 that rains had increased in northwest China by up to 33 per cent since 1961 and floods nationwide had increased sevenfold since the 1950s It predicted still more frequent flooding this century UNITED STATES In Iowa soaked by its wettest 36 month period in 127 years of recordkeeping floodwaters from three nights of rain this week forced hundreds from their homes and killed a 16 year old girl The international climate panel projected increased U S precipitation this century except for the Southwest and more extreme rain events causing flooding ARCTIC Researchers last week spotted a 100 square mile 260 square kilometre chunk of ice calved off from the great Petermann Glacier in Greenland s far northwest It was the most massive ice island to break away in the Arctic in a half century of observation The huge iceberg appeared just five months after an international scientific team published a report saying ice loss from the Greenland ice sheet is expanding up its northwest coast from the south Changes in the ice sheet are happening fast and we are definitely losing more ice mass than we had anticipated said one of the scientists NASA s Isabella Velicogna In the Arctic Ocean itself the summer melt of the vast ice cap has reached unprecedented proportions in recent years Satellite data show the ocean area covered by ice last month was the second lowest ever recorded for July The melting of land ice into the oceans is causing about 60 per cent of the accelerating rise in sea levels worldwide

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/589/scientists-forecast-much-more-of-the-same (2016-02-09)
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  • » Wild things | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Ontario and a top canoeing region that offers more than 1 600 kilometres of canoe routes It covers 450 000 hectares of secluded wilderness in the heart of the boreal forest and the Canadian Shield The park is included in the Pimachiowin Aki World Heritage Project a push by four First Nations and the governments of Manitoba and Ontario to have 40 000 square kilometres of vast boreal forest rivers lakes and wetlands designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site The non profit Pimachiowin Aki Corporation notes this area provides important habitat for wildlife including woodland caribou wolverine and bald eagles During a conversation around our crackling campfire one evening trip organizer Jerry Ameis a mathematics professor at the University of Winnipeg revealed that he s been coming to the park since the late 1960s I made some of the original portage trails Jerry said as the setting sun s rays cast a pinkish radiance across the skyline and the serene waters of Jester Lake We just put up some blaze marks notches on tree trunks Some of them have become actual portages I came with some buddies every year I like the variety of routes possible It s not too crowded like Quetico Provincial Park along the U S border near Fort Frances Ont After driving up highway 59 to Libau we took highway 317 to Lac du Bonnet and then 313 315 and 314 to our launch point Beresford Lake in Nopiming Provincial Park the southwest corner of Woodland Caribou and the access route into Garner Lake During the course of our 10 day trip we paddled more than 100 kilometres and did 35 portages with two down days This was after all a holiday and not an adventure race On one particularly gruelling portage we were accompanied by heat humidity black flies and mosquitoes The 825 metre trek took us from a higher part of the Garner River to a lower part My able canoe partner naturalist Monica Reid and I carefully carried our 18 foot Kevlar canoe along the narrow undulating trail through the Canadian Shield and boot sucking bog We then returned to schlep all our gear The procedure took at least 45 minutes We repeated it on our return trip But it was all part of the wilderness experience and I wouldn t have had it any other way Although we didn t see any large predators or moose or caribou there were signs of them particularly wolf and bear scat on the trails and at one of our campsites The animals were well aware of our presence that s why we didn t see any Monica said Also we kept our campsites clean Still we did see several bald eagles Ospreys double crested cormorants and loons and even spotted two great grey owls on our final day of paddling I was enraptured by the blended bouquet of black spruce pine balsam and aspen and other smaller flora species including wild blueberries Monica s trained

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/592/wild-things (2016-02-09)
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  • » MANITOBA APOLOGIZES TO SAYISI DENE | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    in Manitoba history must be acknowledged While the federal government of the time was responsible for the relocation others including provincial officials contributed to the tragedy said Robinson With this apology we pledge to never forget the tremendous suffering initiated over 50 years ago that continues in so many ways to this day The Province of Manitoba accepts responsibility for erroneous information that validated the relocation and commits to moving forward in a better way The decision to relocate the Dene community at Duck Lake prior to 1956 was made in part due to reports from Manitoba officials who believed the traditional hunting practices of the Dene were contributing to a perceived decline of area caribou herds called a caribou crisis by some officials at the time After the relocation it was determined there was no crisis and the caribou herd which the Sayisi Dene had relied upon for generations was in fact healthy Subsequent Manitoba decisions further compounded the suffering of the Dene living in deplorable conditions near Churchill until community members relocated to their traditional area at Tadoule Lake in 1973 In less than two decades nearly one third of the Sayisi Dene had died as a result of violence poverty and racism experienced on the outskirts of Churchill It s a new day to fly said Thorassie This is an important step on the path or reconciliation and healing We have a responsibility to work together to build the future we want for our children despite a legacy of hurt born of past government mistakes Let us harness the winds of change around us and let us move forward towards a reconciliation of our treaty rights recognition of the injustice done to my people and restoration of our Aboriginal rights to our homeland Manitoba has proposed to

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/586/manitoba-apologizes-to-sayisi-dene (2016-02-09)
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  • » Colourful lake jewel of new park | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    the creation of a new provincial park The park would be in north central Manitoba at Little Limestone Lake a 15 kilometre body of water north of Grand Rapids The lake is in a limestone region with underground drainage and many cavities and passages caused by dissolution of the rock It is referred to as a marl lake since it changes colour when calcite precipitates in the water as the lake s temperature rises in summer Protecting one of the most amazing examples of a marl lake in the world is an important legacy we can leave for future generations Conservation Minister Bill Blaikie said Because of its rare geography Little Limestone Lake stands out among Manitoba lakes for its annual cycle of magnificent colour changes Ron Thiessen executive director for the Manitoban branch of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society said the current park reserve boundary is not adequate to ensure the lake is protected If polluted waters enter from outside of the protected boundary they will cause irreparable damage to Little Limestone s delicate ecosystem Thiessen said With the co operation of the Moose Lake Resource Management Board the Manitoba government is developing a conservation plan for the

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/582/colourful-lake-jewel-of-new-park (2016-02-09)
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  • » Park visitors to try hands at research | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    gave the Free Press a tour of some research projects citizen scientists will be recruited for The first ones started this week helping students haul up creels of slimy sculpin Changes in the size or population of the scaleless minnow are one of the first signs of change in lake oxygen levels Being a citizen scientist also promises to be fun Who doesn t want to get out on a boat and take samples and get a little bit wet and find out what s actually going on It is in many respects way more interesting than watching CSI because you are personally involved said information officer Cate Watrous The other part of it is these projects promote public engagement with the research in the park The more interested people there are the more people will be aware of and supportive of measures to protect the environment The key to the program will be the length of time private citizens are willing to commit It s uncertain whether the research work will be for a day a week or a month said Christian Tremblay in charge of program protocol Another project that will need citizen scientists is making an inventory of Riding Mountain s 50 lakes besides Clear Lake The project involves use of an underwater camera and gathering samples of macrophytes leafy underwater plants I keep thinking I ll see the Ogopogo joked summer student employee Heather Gray referring to the legendary lake monster of Lake Okanagan while looking through the underwater camera on Moon Lake Gray and Eric Anderson of the University of Winnipeg head the project which will also record levels of phosphorus nitrogen dissolved oxygen acidity and algae in lakes Citizen scientists could help gather macrophyte samples measure lake depths and even paddle It s easier

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/580/park-visitors-to-try-hands-at-research (2016-02-09)
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