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  • » PROVINCE ANNOUNCES PLANS FOR ABORIGINAL INTERPRETIVE LEARNING CENTRE » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail PROVINCE ANNOUNCES PLANS FOR ABORIGINAL INTERPRETIVE LEARNING CENTRE To A Friend Email a copy of PROVINCE ANNOUNCES PLANS FOR ABORIGINAL INTERPRETIVE LEARNING CENTRE to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your Remark

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/621/province-announces-plans-for-aboriginal-interpretive-learning-centre/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Manitoba ‘stalling’ on new park, groups say » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    the Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Manitoba stalling on new park groups say To A Friend Email a copy of Manitoba stalling on new park groups say to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your Remark Friend

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/627/manitoba-stalling-on-new-park-groups-say/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Maintaining the role of Canada’s forests and peatlands in climate regulation » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Maintaining the role of Canada s forests and peatlands in climate regulation To A Friend Email a copy of Maintaining the role of Canada s forests and peatlands in climate regulation to a friend Required Field Your Name Your

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/616/maintaining-the-role-of-canada%e2%80%99s-forests-and-peatlands-in-climate-regulation/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » BROKENHEAD OJIBWAY NATION AND MANITOBA AGREE TO DEVELOP A PROPOSAL FOR CO-MANAGEMENT OF PETROFORM SITES IN WHITESHELL » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail BROKENHEAD OJIBWAY NATION AND MANITOBA AGREE TO DEVELOP A PROPOSAL FOR CO MANAGEMENT OF PETROFORM SITES IN WHITESHELL To A Friend Email a copy of BROKENHEAD OJIBWAY NATION AND MANITOBA AGREE TO DEVELOP A PROPOSAL FOR CO MANAGEMENT OF PETROFORM SITES IN WHITESHELL to a

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/611/brokenhead-manitoba-petroform-sites-whiteshell/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Stories | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    the Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources CIER has taken her across the country and the world working as a researcher instructor and workshop facilitator on First Nations issues related to climate change energy efficiency and renewable energy programs Yet in spite of this impressive knowledge base and experience she is approachable and genuine And I discovered as the interview progressed very pragmatically spiritual It was the latter trait that I chose to highlight in the following article Her words made a deep impact on my reflections regarding personal responsibility for our environment and future I m going to tell you a story Shaunna begins It comes from the Read the rest of this story Posted in Stories 2 Comments Chief David Crate Fisher River Cree Nation A Community s Journey to Create a Provincial Park There are places that maintain a precarious existence Desired for their economic wealth there are places so rich in natural resources that development interests are many These same places possess innate beauty and largely intact ecosystems and are rich in more than the limited sense of the word Ochiwasahow is such a place Sought after by opposing interests its inherent value is precisely why Chief David Crate of Fisher River Cree Nation intends to keep it the way it is If one were to have visited the Fisher Bay area 130 years ago it would closely resemble the place we see today But there are many interests in this area from logging and mining companies especially on the east side Chief Crate explains There are many obstacles Read the rest of this story Posted in Stories 4 Comments Greg McIvor Manitoba Hydro s Flooded Legacy Twelve stories up we look out upon the city It is raining and pools of standing water are forming on the flat roofed buildings below It is a perspective perhaps similar to that of a bird in mid flight the sky is dull and grey mirroring the colossal expanse of concrete and asphalt surrounding us What I don t understand is how they can get away with calling it renewable says Greg McIvor In a process that is not only unfair to First Nations people but one that according to Mr McIvor involves blatant misrepresentation of information by Manitoba Hydro For generations Mr McIvor and his family have hunted and trapped in an area 52 kilometers south of Waskwatim Lake known as Trapline 18 close to Thompson Manitoba Already impacted by surrounding hydropower generation the trapline may be further damaged by Manitoba Hydro s plans to build a dam Read the rest of this story Posted in Stories 1 Comment Garry Raven Open Response An Open Response to those who want a Hydro Bipole on the Eastside of Lake Winnipeg Ahnee As an Elder and a pipe carrier the lands on the Eastside of Lake Winnipeg is sacred It is the place where the Creator sits where we get our teachings hold our ceremonies have our sweat lodges a place

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/category/stories/page/6 (2016-02-09)
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  • » Ron Plain | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    kind it is surrounded by 62 petrochemical refineries National Geographic staff called us the most polluted spot in North America he says We re the worst case scenario Aamjiwnaang has been through a series of toxic battles In 2002 one of the area s petrochemical refineries Imperial Oil had a catalyst release a spill of different toxic products from the refinery onto neighbouring lands Imperial attempted to clean up the area and offered a financial settlement which many took Yet when another oil company Sunoco announced it was developing Canada s largest ethanol plant right across the road from Aamjiwnaang s heart the community awoke Until then we were kind of blinded We believed somewhere there was that government safety net watching after us he says Now we began to look at strategies that could stop this from happening Plain is a strong believer in grassroots Aboriginal action He co founded the Aamjiwnaang Environmental Committee an organization made up of community members spearheading the research and legal struggle in the area The Aamjiwnaang First Nation began a long battle with oil companies toxic waste and pollution and the governments that fund all this They blocked roads hired experts and led to financial losses measuring in the tens of thousands for the Petroleum industry The tide of the Boreal is that that s where you learn you go in there and everything in there is waiting for you Doesn t matter whether you ve been there once or a million times it never looks the same Despite this the 850 people of Aamjiwnaang are now in mortal danger due to high mercury levels in the community s drinking water a host of toxin related cardiovascular problems rare cancer clusters that are denied by Health Canada and a dropping birthrate of boys due to high endocrine disruptors in the area there are now two girls being born for every boy Experts believe Aamjiwnaang is the first known case of a endocrine disrpution among humans a practice so different from the norm it has many worried about the community s cultural and ancestoral survival We re the opposite of normal birth rates and we re the opposite to an extreme where known experts say we re the first sign of extinction When recalling his toxic ordeal Plain does not falter He speaks with conviction of the solution in community mobilization and traditional knowledge The role of the community is paramount says Plain The community needs to be educated to what the problems are Not talked down to but educated Motivated by his experience Plain joined Environmental Defence in July 2007 and formed the Aboriginal Program of the organization He provides counselling and assistance in finding resources to First Nations communities across North America who are battling environmental hazards His unit is also working on a community developed strategy for environmental protection Plain believes maintaining the Earth s gifts may be our biggest mission Spurred by his own loss of the Boreal forest he

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/56/ron-plain (2016-02-09)
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  • » Garry Robson | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Resource Centre MFNERC and the Fur Institute of Canada an organization of trappers and government officials designed to promote the sustainable use of Canada s fur resources formed a partnership to create the Reconnecting With the Land program for Aboriginal youth This program is comprised of various classes such as Community Studies Hunting Fishing and Trapping These courses can be incorporated into the mainstream high school curriculum in Manitoba Youth in these classes learn valuable skills and sustainable trade practices with an emphasis on land stewardship and traditional beliefs Mr Robson believes that this kind of earth focused practical education that includes outdoor sessions promotes the wise use of resources as well as cultural awareness in a more lasting way than the classroom experience alone The Inuit people have over forty words for snow because they need to know exactly how to live in that climate a person s success depends upon being precise in knowledge of the environment Likewise in other Aboriginal communities there are over eighteen different names for spruce trees based on uses in the community and the growth stages of the tree itself This kind of knowledge is indispensable in learning how to treat the environment with respect Mr Robson states A tree is not just a tree it has a reason and a purpose We must remember we are the youngest of creation If the water dies we die if the trees die we die and if the animals die we die But if we die everything else will continue so how important are we Mr Robson stresses the importance of oral traditions in helping youth understand Aboriginal culture In societies that value writing more than speaking the lessons instilled through oral traditions are often lost Writing is a solitary act therefore it is inherently individualistic and singular in perspective Oral communication on the other hand contains a repetitious communal element where the teachings of the community can be told again and again Mr Robson also tells us that Aboriginal Peoples of Turtle Island do have a writing system but some of us have lost the ability to read it Evidence of this writing system includes the wampum belts the winter counts rock paintings petroforms petroglph and scrolls These are all a form of writing and there are still people that can read and talk to us and re teach us how the read them I believe says Mr Robson Youth have a distinct place within traditional Aboriginal oral culture We have four levels of stories explains Mr Robson one for children one for youth one for parents and one for grandparents By connecting with youth through stories and keeping an open dialogue with them lessons can be repeated as often as needed As a result traditional practices are undertaken with these teachings in mind All people require this constancy says Mr Robson because when it comes to our impulses to sacrifice the environment for our own comfort We give in too easy We need

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/51/garry-robson (2016-02-09)
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  • » Elissa Kixen | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    well as the Academy of Broadcasting in Winnipeg With the help of Supporting Employment Economic Development SEED Winnipeg a local organization that helps people start small businesses Ms Kixen created and is now the Artistic Director of The Improv Experience through which she is currently teaching theatre to aboriginal youth in foster care At SEED Winnipeg that s where I really learned about community economic development and the importance of it Ms Kixen also works at Ka Ni Kanichihk a Winnipeg organization whose mandate is to provide resources for aboriginal people in the area of education training leadership and healing programs geared toward the reclamation of traditional cultures among other things Ms Kixen is the Aboriginal Youth Coordinator Assistant for the Aboriginal Youth Circle United Against Racism programs and her time is largely spent working with youth public speaking facilitating anti racism and cycle of oppression workshops and creating partnerships with other organizations Further one of their mandates is to build better relationships between newcomer aboriginal and established youth We believe that knowledge is power says Ms Kixen which is why Ka Ni Kanichihk organizes speakers and forum discussions regularly She explains that there is a strong focus on having youth know what s going on around them not only in the political aspects but in their environment Pre contact we were the keepers of the land so we try to keep those values alive We focus on being conscious knowing that every decision does affect your environment around you Pre contact we were the keepers of the land so we try to keep those values alive We focus on being conscious knowing that every decision does affect your environment around you If we had more leaders in the city I think it would not only benefit the urban settings but it would benefit the communities who actually live off the land and try to take care of it Ms Kixen explains that traditional aboriginal teachings inherently include environmental aspects as interconnectedness with nature is part of tradition She describes the teachings of the drum in which the drumbeats represent the earth s heartbeat and traditional powwows which do not include greasy food stands at the periphery she notes adamantly in which dancing on the ground represents a connection with the earth Personally Ms Kixen finds that it s the little things that add up when it comes to sustainability she shops locally does not eat animal by products uses public transportation regularly as well as the classic Reduce Reuse and Recycle trio When I heard about boreal conservation initiatives I remember being really torn says Ms Kixen This is because though she feels that conservation projects are incredibly important she also recognizes that aboriginal land rights issues are inextricably tangled in conservation efforts In the past when certain areas of forest were designated as conservation areas First Nations people lost their rights to hunt and fish there That was my one concern this is just another way that aboriginal

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/46/elissa-kixen (2016-02-09)
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