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  • » Privacy Policy | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    parties Abcleaders org uses WordPress as our blogging platform When you leave comments on our site your name email website and IP address is stored within our web server system Your email address is never publicly shown and is only disclosed to the following operators of this website the website administrator and employees of Cpaws org Your IP address only identifies your internet connection From time to time Abcleaders org may hold contests or promotions to help initiate community dialog on this website and local environmental issues Your information will be used to collect entries into a draw and if your name is drawn we will contact you via the email address you provide Our visitors can choose to electronically forward a link page or documents to someone else by clicking e mail this to a friend The user must provide their email address as well as that of the recipient This information is used only to let the recipient know who sent the email Your information is not used for any other purpose except to add your name to a draw should we be holding a contest or promotion at the time In the future we may launch an

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/privacy (2016-02-09)
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  • » Stories | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    cavernous rooms This characteristic makes it difficult to locate the caves and as a result their total number remains a mystery By far the most important of the known sites in the province houses 25 000 bats each winter and is adjacent to the proposed Ochiwasahow or Fisher Bay provincial park The proposed park area includes abundant forests including old growth which is ideal summer habitat for maternity colonies of little brown bats The greatest threat to the Little Brown Bat is the loss of their habitat Fisher River Cree Nation is working to protect the area by asking the government to establish a Fisher Bay provincial park Protecting the caves as well as the Read the rest of this story Posted in Stories No Comments Morning Star Gone Legacy Lives On Traditional medicine man and teacher Morning Star Garry Raven passed away on January 17 2010 I met him in 2001 when I visited his home in Hollow Water First Nation to discuss the potential of the Manigotagan River and surrounding area being protected in a provincial park He welcomed me with open arms and I soon became impressed by Garry s vast knowledge and strong desire to protect the Boreal Forest from industrial developments Since our first meeting the Manigotagan River park has been formed and I have spent many days chatting with Garry and attending inspiring gatherings at Ravens Creek Ti pi Village his home and teaching place Garry took many of his visitors on walks to locate traditional medicines and explain their uses He also taught individuals and groups about Aboriginal spirituality and customs Garry is known widely for Read the rest of this story Posted in Stories No Comments Bloodvein River First Nation joins efforts to protect Boreal Forest through World Heritage Site Bloodvein River First Nation has joined the quest for a World Heritage Site on the east side of Lake Winnipeg As an active member of Pimachiowin Aki a unique partnership to safeguard the Anishinabe culture and the boreal forest Bloodvein River First Nation joins the First Nations of Poplar River Little Grand Rapids Paungassi and Pikangikum as well as the provincial governments of Manitoba and Ontario William Young band councilor and spokesperson for Bloodvein First Nation reveals that more than half of the community s traditional territory of 4300 square kilometres will be added to the current 40 000 square kilometres in the proposed World Heritage Site area He states it is likely more land will be included after consultation with community membership Bloodvein River First Nation is located 210 kilometres north of Winnipeg along three kilometres of shoreline on Read the rest of this story Posted in Stories 3 Comments Shawna Snache For millennia Canada s indigenous peoples have sustained complex relationships with the wildlife and environments in which they lived This wisdom embraces the need to live in harmony and peace with the earth and with one another Shawna Snache carries on this cultural tradition inspiring change through her words

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/category/stories/page/2 (2016-02-09)
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  • » Dr. Peggy Wilson and Dr. Stan Wilson: Land-based Education | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    can happen All this is ancient Indigenous Peoples knowledge learned from living and observing the ways of nature over many centuries Central to this is the land Mother Earth as some folks call it It is thus like a textbook that once one learns to read the knowledge is there This way of teaching and learning I have called Indigegogy This circle of learning is perpetuated on many planes within the lives of the Wilsons themselves through their children who all hold graduate degrees through the family of Aboriginal scholars that is rapidly developing and in the soon to be established at the University of Saskatchewan International Indigenous Doctoral Program that they have developed along with a working group of International Scholars These varying levels of discussion enrich the circle of knowledge that exists within the Indigenist paradigm and leads to a diversification of interpretation and understanding This method of education does not simply mean taking university level courses off campus but rather embodies a much fuller concept Students are provided with experiences and their subsequent interpretations are their own not dictated to them or inferred from assigned text Stan points out that though it is difficult for professors and students alike to make the shift away from learning through book text all of the Wilsons past Masters and PhD students hold undergraduate degrees from the Western Paradigm s education tradition learning from the land is just as credible as learning from books Students must be able to analyze their experience from the Indigenist perspective for some a life changing experience develop a theory and discuss their experience in writing in order to be able to articulate it It teaches students to learn how to learn from the land This results in a rich combination of experience interpretation and balance between different forms of discourse traditional and otherwise there has to be a moving back and forth between oral tradition and written text Peggy Part of understanding the paradigm is coming to understand and read the land around us so that we can fully understand what our responsibilities are learning from the land is just as credible as learning from books An holistic lifestyle approach is taken in the Land Based Education Program all four quadrants physical spiritual cognitive and emotional are drawn from in order to acquire knowledge By addressing a variety of needs from these realms students are engaged at a deeper level of participation in which they live fully and consciously From paddling running and the gathering of medicinal herbs to meal preparation students are given the experiences needed in order to fuel their ensuing thesis pursuits However as Peggy clarifies it is not just having the experience but being able to understand and analyze it which separates this program from western methods of education It uses the land as text as a means to develop experiential education as opposed to a regurgitation of taught knowledge For example how do trees like other living forms live in

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/634/dr-peggy-wilson-and-dr-stan-wilson-land-based-education (2016-02-09)
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  • » Chief Derek Nepinak | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    the value systems we live by nor our deep connection to the lands we know and the lands we have always known better than anyone else A primary value that comes out of this deep seated practical as well as spiritual relationship to the lands and waters is stewardship We don t separate ourselves from the environment the way some cultures and societies do Some societies look at the land as something to be exploited for dollars We don t think that way We are part of the land just like any other animal is We have a duty to maintain that ecosystem and make sure it is intact for future generations Explaining that the urban reality is quite different from that that exists in Manitoba s northern boreal forest Chief Nepinak advocates for the need for those relationships with the natural world to be re instilled and reinvented He asserts that the fast paced economy far removes people from experiencing the valuable things in life It is difficult to appreciate the world around us when we don t have a connection to the land and therefore cannot understand it You have to have an understanding of their animals behaviour in order to survive People see a bear across the lake and they re terrified Meanwhile the bear is living just as you are That understanding is gone now We ve gone to looking at these elements in nature as being in opposition to our interests and that s not the case at all And that s what makes me someone who is interested in conservation is because of the enhancement of relationships in nature and those things that are around us Restoring the balance is integral to this concept of harmony with the earth something that First Nations people have practiced for millennia and many continue to do so To an observer it may look like a gift given in return for a gift a sprinkle of tobacco for picking sweet grass for example But the concept is much more complex and embodies a spiritual relationship that identifies these things not as simply gifts but as offerings Offerings meant to restore the balance are made for even the simplest activities Chief Nepinak recounts how tobacco is placed in the small holes needed to erect the poles for a sweat lodge He adds If you re offering tobacco for something that simple to restore the balance in the relationship with the land what are the impacts of an open pit mine a 4000 foot deep hole in the ground How much tobacco would it take to fill that hole up He laughs but is sincere It s almost impossible to reconcile and what that does is create a disharmony with the environment We are part of the land just like any other animal is We have a duty to maintain that ecosystem and make sure it is intact for future generations that s what makes me someone who is interested

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/623/chief-derek-nepinak (2016-02-09)
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  • » Maria M’Lot | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    National Park of Canada in the Yukon and later moved to Churchill Manitoba to undertake graduate work Based out of Churchill Maria worked with Wapusk National Park of Canada York Factory and Fox Lake First Nations to help develop Cree place name maps and landscape terms for the area Part Cree Maria is fluent in the Cree language and as part of her graduate work to obtain a Masters degree in Natural Resource Management Maria met and interviewed Elders and community residents to learn how the Cree language was used to describe the surrounding landscapes landforms and waterbodies There is a lot of history behind names Cree place names are very descriptive Some names were given because of a species of animal or the names were based on activities that they used to do there Regardless of her accomplishments Maria insists How can I have as much knowledge as someone who has lived in the area and has lived off the land for many years It is one thing to protect the boreal but it is getting people to enjoy it respect it and experience it We talk with the communities and to them the boreal extends everywhere and gives them life they don t think of borders rather the boreal is everywhere Through their time spent in the community and on the land Elders and community members provide insightful wisdom on many issues affecting their traditional lands and communities Yet control over the development of natural resources and other land uses by non First Nation governments for example has stifled First Nation involvement in local issues As a result Maria explains that perhaps one of the greatest challenges facing First Nations is the sense of helplessness and feeling of a loss of control over their traditional lands and communities Communities need funding support and encouragement to help motivate and empower them says Maria Through her work with CIER Maria provides technical support and helps First Nations set up programs train individuals and also assists with finding funding to encourage community driven participation in addressing their environmental issues Maria s efforts help communities regain a sense of empowerment It is important to get First Nations involved from the very beginning When you work closely with the community it has more merit community buy in and support and long term impact Over the past year and a half Maria has been involved with northern Ontario First Nations and finding ways to support them in planning for the boreal In 2008 the Provincial Government of Ontario committed to protect half of Ontario s boreal forest without including First Nations in the decision making process or development of the commitment Furthermore First Nations have been asked to present land use plans for their traditional territories However as Maria explains the land use plans requested by the Province of Ontario do not correspond with how First Nations view the boreal We talk with the communities and to them the boreal extends everywhere and gives

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/558/maria-m%e2%80%99lot (2016-02-09)
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  • » Valerie Courtois | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    was to implement the new forest management plan Since this was largely a scientific based plan this involved reducing the gap between the science and the cumulative data between standard forestry practices and what people needed in the community Under the newly formed Guardian Program Innu members were trained as forest technicians interviewers and community liaisons and were responsible for meeting with community members to address what it was they needed from the forest It s really about planning for humans and not about planning for the forest itself If there s no Innu then there s no Innu economy So you have to protect Nitassiman and you have to protect the land first to make sure it can support what Innu need to be Innu in order to create an Innu economy Land use planning is key for ensuring that you have what you need to be you and for ensuring that you also have a future in development and to grow To create certainty It s a very important tool that you can bring to government and industry in negotiating with them to ensure that their activities don t impact you in a negative way anyway This is where the Innu have deviated significantly from typical forest planning The usual method has been to allocate areas for industrial development first without any long term planning for other land use practices The Innu understood that this type of planning approach wouldn t work for them and so set out to plan their future and incidentally the future of their children and grandchildren They started by determining what it was they wanted to protect Community members provided input and were asked what areas were important to them and what needed to stay They essentially determined what it was that made the landscape the landscape The network of protected areas ended up being important cultural sites travel routes and harvesting areas they were all interconnected Protection of 50 percent is a huge area its bigger than other forest management areas but there is still development in some areas where people felt uncomfortable and that was because of something that just couldn t be translated into planning some spiritual value or a story that is associated with a place that you can t really draw around or account for necessarily Valerie explains With such an ambitious plan challenges are inevitable especially when there are great differences in opinions and needs throughout the community But these plans should and need to be done Valerie asserts For the Innu Nation the need to bring in industry and jobs into Goose Bay was evident the alternative was to send out Labrador s high value wood from boreal forests which would send jobs out of the province as well The Innu Nation s progressive ecosystem based management plan also meant the community is well prepared and now in a position for future decision making regarding forestry Land use planning is key for ensuring that you have

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/539/valerie-courtois (2016-02-09)
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  • » Kaaren Dannenmann | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    3 she is helping to reestablish the sacred relationship between Aboriginal people and the boreal forest The establishment of the registered trapline system in the 1940 s greatly affected Aboriginal peoples relationship to the land The government knew of Aboriginal s relationship to the land yet wanted Native people to look at the land as a commodity instead of being a part of them expresses Karen Assigning specific sections of land was an attempt for trapping to become privatized and commodified in order to begin the shift of trapping from being first and foremost a spiritual activity to an economic activity which would create a disconnection from the land Though Kaaren says It never quite happened that way Aboriginal boreal and caribou are one together It is important to train young people ourselves to help promote a spiritual activity and to keep them connected to the land Aboriginal people still see themselves as caretakers of the land born into that responsibility much as the land takes care of them Their relationship to the land is a sacred spiritual and cultural connection which sadly has been jeopardized from external regulation Provincial trapping programs teach youth that the land is a resource to make money off of a contradiction to traditional Aboriginal culture which views the land as part of their community of relations Therefore Kaaren strongly asserts that It is important to train young people ourselves to help promote a spiritual activity and to keep them connected to the land Kaaren has done just that Kaaren uses spiritual and cultural traditions from the land to teach youth traditional trapping skills When learning trapping skills it is important for youth to be familiar with safety conservation and humaneness We deal with those when we talk about the medicine wheel Teachings and the

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/534/kaaren-dannenmann (2016-02-09)
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  • » Resource Library | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    relating to the Boreal Forest and Aboriginal conservation efforts Feel free to download them for your own personal use IBA TOOL KIT The IBA Community Toolkit is a free resource for First Nation Inuit and Métis communities in Canada engaged in negotiating agreements with mining companies Its goal is to help communities negotiators and consultants achieve positive agreements for Aboriginal communities This toolkit was commissioned by the Walter and Duncan

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/library (2016-02-09)
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