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  • » Don’t neglect natural solutions to climate change crisis, experts tell Canada | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    yield one of the most powerful solutions to the climate crisis said Nigel Dudley ecologist and industrial fellow at the University of Queensland Protected areas help prevent the loss of carbon that is already present in vegetation peat and soils They also help society cope with climate change impacts by maintaining essential services upon which people depend The experts in Toronto for one day only are promoting the findings of their new report called Natural Solutions protected areas helping people cope with climate change The report was authored by a team of trained ecologists economists and other experts In the rush for new solutions to climate change we are in danger of neglecting a proven alternative says Nik Lopoukhine formerly Director General Parks Canada a Canadian and Chair of the World Commission on Protected Areas Protected areas are an investment which societies have made for a millennia using traditional approaches which have proven their potential and effectiveness in modern times added Lopoukhine Actually expanding protected area coverage and involving indigenous and local communities in these efforts could be one of the most effective ways to reinforce nature and peoples resilience to climate change said The Nature Conservancy s Trevor Sandwith a co author from South Africa who is also Deputy Chair of the IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas With 2010 being the International Year of Biodiversity maintaining and expanding protected areas needs to be recognized as a powerful tool against climate change and should be a component of national and sub national climate change strategies Protected areas play a major role in reducing climate changing carbon dioxide emissions in the atmosphere In Canada over 4 billion tons of carbon dioxide is sequestered in 39 national parks estimated to be worth 39 87 billion in carbon credits Two provinces have

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/403/dont-neglect-natural-solutions-climate-change-crisis (2016-02-09)
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  • » Traditional Aboriginal Knowledge Key To Boreal Forest Conservation | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    report contributes to building a better awareness among Canadians about the richness and diversity of plant use and knowledge among indigenous peoples The report illustrates how scientists and policymakers often overlook ecological issues until a crisis arises For example although few plants species in the boreal region are classified as threatened or endangered under the federal Species at Risk Act or provincial and territorial species legislation many face widespread human induced pressures including habitat loss and climate change According to respected Canadian scientist and environmentalist David Suzuki Harvesting processing and selling wild plants such as blueberries from the Boreal Forest offers sustenance and profit to many northern communities in Canada Industrial activities undertaken without the prior involvement or consent of indigenous people can harm important species that sustain community health and wellbeing Environmental studies professor Nancy Turner of the University of Victoria in British Columbia agrees This report acknowledges that we must not overlook the close interrelationships between indigenous peoples and their lands Scientists must consider their critical importance as keepers of traditional ecological knowledge The report follows a recent study by the UN Secretariat for the Convention on Biodiversity CBD that emphasizes the critical importance of forest biodiversity in preserving the planet s overall health If climate change is a problem biodiversity is part of the solution said Ahmed Djoghlaf the UN s executive secretary of the Convention on Biological Diversity Canada s Boreal Forest plays a critical role Indigenous peoples have long known that maintaining and restoring biodiversity in forests promotes their resilience to human induced pressures Now more than ever this is an essential insurance policy to safeguard against climate change impacts and to protect biodiversity for the benefit of present and future generation The report issued today is a major contribution to the celebration of the 2010 International Year on Biodiversity The new report also suggests much more indigenous mapping of the Boreal Forest has taken place than previously understood Scientific information has been encoded in indigenous peoples languages and is passed on through various stories and place names For example the Gwich in identified black currant island in the Husky River area as well as a hill along the Arctic Red River whose name translates into rosehips ripened by the sun The Dogrib call Mesa Lake in the Northwest Territories Gots okati which translates to Cloudberry Lake Full Report www borealbirds org resources report ethnobotany pdf For background information including b roll photos and expert contacts for interviews go to www borealbirds org ethnobotany shtml The David Suzuki Foundation The David Suzuki Foundation works with government business and individuals to conserve our environment by providing science based education advocacy and policy work and acting as a catalyst for the social change www davidsuzuki org Canadian Boreal Initiative The Canadian Boreal Initiative brings together diverse partners to create new solutions for boreal conservation and sustainable development It acts as a catalyst for on the ground efforts across the boreal forest region by governments industry Aboriginal communities

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/398/traditional-aboriginal-knowledge-key-to-boreal-forest-conservation (2016-02-09)
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  • » Aboriginal Lands and The Crowns – Impacts and Consultations » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Aboriginal Lands and The Crowns Impacts and Consultations To A Friend Email a copy of Aboriginal Lands and The Crowns Impacts and Consultations to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your Remark

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/469/aboriginal-lands-and-the-crowns-impacts-and-consultations/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Enviro law changes cut out native input, create conflict, say aboriginals » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Enviro law changes cut out native input create conflict say aboriginals To A Friend Email a copy of Enviro law changes cut out native input create conflict say aboriginals to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/467/enviro-law-changes-cut-out-native-input-create-conflict-say-aboriginals/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Pine Falls Newsprint Mill Uncertainty Leads to Exploration of Alternative Uses of the Forest » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Pine Falls Newsprint Mill Uncertainty Leads to Exploration of Alternative Uses of the Forest To A Friend Email a copy of Pine Falls Newsprint Mill Uncertainty Leads to Exploration of Alternative Uses of the Forest to a friend Required Field Your

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/463/pine-falls-newsprint-mill-uncertainty-leads-to-exploration-of-alternative-uses-of-the-forest/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Native leaders lobby for speedy end to flood lawsuit » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Native leaders lobby for speedy end to flood lawsuit To A Friend Email a copy of Native leaders lobby for speedy end to flood lawsuit to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/452/native-leaders-lobby-for-speedy-end-to-flood-lawsuit/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Stand Firm Manitoba: Protect the Heart of the Boreal and Say No to an Industrial Transmission Line » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Stand Firm Manitoba Protect the Heart of the Boreal and Say No to an Industrial Transmission Line To A Friend Email a copy of Stand Firm Manitoba Protect the Heart of the Boreal and Say No to an Industrial Transmission Line to a friend

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/427/stand-firm-manitoba-protect-the-heart-of-the-boreal-and-say-no-to-an-industrial-transmission-line/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » In the News | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    as well as ecological and cultural tourism would bring in about 40 million per year the study concluded An area around the bay was granted interim protection by the province as a potential park site in 1999 A study done in 2006 recommended those boundaries be expanded according to the best ecological and cultural considerations rather than political lines said Ron Thiessen executive director of Manitoba s chapter with the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society The most recent study released today examined the prospects of that broader area The Read the rest of this story Posted in In the News No Comments MANITOBA HONOURED BY PRESENTATION OF 2009 BOREAL AWARD ROBINSON Award Recognizes Dedication of Province To Protecting Sustaining Boreal Forest Manitoba is extremely honoured to receive a 2009 Boreal Award in recognition of the province s efforts in co operation with First Nations to protect and sustain Canada s boreal forest Deputy Premier Eric Robinson minister of Aboriginal and northern affairs said today Since 1999 Manitoba has permanently protected 871 000 hectares of land in parks wildlife management areas and ecological reserves Robinson said We are committed to expanding on this by adding more protected areas On behalf of the province former premier Gary Doer and Premier Greg Selinger it is a distinct honour to accept the Boreal Award in recognition of this important conservation work The award was presented by the Canadian Boreal Initiative CBI yesterday at a ceremony in Ottawa CBI works with First Nations conservation organizations industry and other interested parties to link science policy and conservation initiatives across Read the rest of this story Posted in In the News No Comments Province highlights polar bears climate change in speech MANITOBA S polar bears have a friend in Premier Greg Selinger So does the vast expanse of bog that covers much of northern Manitoba and acts like a huge carbon sink Monday s throne speech confirmed two environmental initiatives that could pay huge dividends Manitoba will make a major contribution to establish a new Polar Bear Research and Arctic exhibit at Assiniboine Park Zoo The polar bear is a good focus because it will attract tourists to Manitoba Selinger said Margaret Redmond president of Assiniboine Park Conservancy said the province s commitment will help the conservancy gets its fundraising going This money gives us the confidence to continue our design phase Redmond said We hope with other funding in place that we could see those pieces completed as early as 2011 The exhibit will be part of a 180 million makeover of Assiniboine Park over the next decade It will include a conservation centre that will work in tandem with the Read the rest of this story Posted in In the News No Comments Weather holding trappers back Manitoba s northern trappers are having a miserable time getting started this year due to unusually mild November weather In such remote places as Lac Brochet trappers typically travel to their trap lines at this time of year

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/category/news/page/10 (2016-02-09)
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