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  • » CONSULTATION PARTICIPATION FUND ANNOUNCED FOR ABORIGINAL COMMUNITIES | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Eric Robinson announced today I am pleased to announce the establishment of the Consultation Participation Fund to support the participation of First Nations Métis and other Aboriginal communities in Manitoba s Section 35 consultations said Robinson Our government remains committed to honouring our duty to consult with Aboriginal communities on provincial decisions or actions that may affect their Aboriginal and treaty rights This fund will help these communities to effectively participate in our consultation efforts The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled under Section 35 of the Constitution Act the Crown has a legal duty to consult with Aboriginal peoples about any action or decision that might affect Aboriginal or treaty rights In order to access funding support from the Consultation Participation Fund Aboriginal communities are encouraged to work with provincial departments in developing joint consultation plans and budgets that require Section 35 consultations Departments will make applications to the fund to cover an Aboriginal community s costs under these joint consultation plans The fund is being managed and administered by the Manitoba government In addition to the creation of this fund the province and the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs will co host a roundtable discussion on consultation and accommodation

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/390/consultation-participation-fund-announced-for-aboriginal-communities (2016-02-09)
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  • » First Nations planning Ring of Fire blockade | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    events that precipitated this denial of service were not due to any specific action on the part of Noront however as the only exploration company currently active in the Ring of Fire Noront is inconvenienced by this action Noront has respected and honoured MFFN by signing an agreement compensating them for exploration work we ve completed on their traditional lands We have undertaken several initiatives regarding education and youth within the MFFN community and we remain committed to building a strong and stable relationship in the future We are therefore not at this time taking any action to limit the protest We will adjust our exploration effort accordingly and we do not believe that this action will limit or otherwise disrupt our development plans at McFauld s Lake The denial of service to our knowledge does not limit our ability to continue active work programs in the area We remain committed to maintaining a close working relationship with MFFN and the other communities in the Ring of Fire I have contacted Chief Moonias to advise him that while we consider the denial of service at Kopper Lake to be unfair to Noront we will abide by the denial of service Noront stated it has been actively canvassing the local First Nations communities and the provincial government to initiate round table negotiations between industry First Nations leaders and provincial government ministries to establish a long term viable development plan that brings the maximum benefit to the most people in the Ring of Fire area The Ring of Fire is considered one of the largest potential mineral reserves in Ontario covering more than 1 5 million ha by some estimates Over 35 junior and intermediate mining and exploration companies are now active in the Ring of Fire making it the recent hotbed of mining activity in the Far North Right now mining activities are superseding the protection of ecological and cultural values said Anna Baggio of CPAWS Wildlands League in a Dec 2009 press release There is very little government oversight no environmental assessment process and no mechanism for First Nation control CPAWS Wildlands League Ecojustice and Mining Watch Canada are concerned development in the Ring of Fire is exploding due to inadequate control under Ontario s antiquated Mining Act calling the situation a Wild West free for all The three public interest groups stated the following concerns in their press release inadequate waste management garbage disposal and fuel spills in several mineral exploration camps polluting of nearby lakes and wetlands inappropriate and possibly illegal use of mining claims to map out two competing railway routes and increased danger for species at risk like woodland caribou and wolverine that need large intact areas of Boreal Forest to survive We are hearing reports of 200 fuel drums sinking into the wetlands because they were placed clumsily on bog mats Baggio said Who will be responsible for cleaning up and restoring these lakes and wetlands The three groups are worried that because claims and

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/381/first-nations-planning-ring-of-fire-blockade (2016-02-09)
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  • » Native Nations respond to climate change threats | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    peoples first and foremost said workshop Co Chair Winona LaDuke Executive Director of Honor the Earth In Alaska some villages are literally falling into the ocean while severe drought in the Southwest is scorching scarce grasslands and forests In the Pacific Northwest salmon runs have been decimated Vector borne diseases are spreading and traditional foods and medicines are disappearing in Native territories across the country Dr Daniel R Wildcat workshop Co Chair and Director of Haskell Indian Nations University s Environmental Research Studies Center said Global warming scenarios point to disproportionate and increased impacts on Native peoples due to their unique relationship to land the prevalence of subsistence land based economies and the deep cultural and spiritual significance of their ties to the land As a follow up to the White House Tribal Summit convened in November the White House sent three representatives from the Council on Environmental Quality CEQ to the Workshop The CEQ held a listening session to hear the direct experiences of Native peoples disproportionately suffering the adverse effects of climate change Others offered solutions including the development of reservation based renewable energy efficient and sustainable housing and Indigenous food production and urged a federal response through the creation of adaptation policies At its conclusion participants issued a milestone document the Mystic Lake Declaration attached to offer solutions that can help Tribal communities and policy makers form plans to address climate change impacts that threaten the traditional cultures and life ways of Indigenous peoples The Declaration will be taken to Copenhagen for presentation at the United Nations Climate Change Conference Sponsored by NASA s Tribal College and University Program the workshop was held in collaboration with the nation s 36 tribally controlled colleges and universities and the American Indian Higher Education Consortium Because the median age in

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/379/native-nations-respond-to-climate-change-threats (2016-02-09)
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  • » Shrinking Sink | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    http journalwatch conservationmagazine org Some forests may sequester less carbon as climate warms As global warming lengthens the growing season for many ecosystems trees may suck more carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere or so some have hoped A study of a subalpine forest however shows that the exact opposite can happen Researchers studied nine years of data on a Colorado forest composed mainly of pine fir and spruce During the years with the longest growing seasons the trees actually took up the least carbon dioxide they found The reason it appears is that longer growing seasons were caused by shallower winter snow pack and trees depended heavily on water from snow melt to support photosynthesis The results reported in Global Change Biology don t apply to all ecosystems For instance other research has suggested that boreal forests do increase their carbon uptake with longer growing seasons But the study doesn t bode well for the mountainous Western U S where snow pack has been decreasing Climate change is expected to reduce snow pack even more the authors say and may weaken this natural carbon sink Roberta Kwok Source Hu J Moore D Burns S Monson R 2010 Longer growing

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/373/shrinking-sink (2016-02-09)
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  • » Fisher River provincial park benefits could total $38 million: report | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    46 per cent employment rate according to the report Of that 10 per cent of jobs are in the fishing industry and 50 per cent are in local social services The majority of the employed leave the community for other opportunities Chief David Crate estimates the eco and cultural tourism industry would provide the area with work for 12 to 15 years We re in discussion with the Radisson Hecla Oasis Resort to link with their eco tourism tours said Crate The Leigh Cochrane Memorial Visitor Centre would coordinate a lot of it The province at the Fisher River s request created the Fisher Bay Park Reserve in 1999 to provide temporary protection to an approximately 89 000 hectare area which is 70 per cent water and includes the Moose Little Moose Tamarack and other islands shoals reefs and adjacent mainland The park s reserve status was renewed in 2005 A year later after analyzing the results of an Areas of Ecological Significance study CPAWS and Fisher River requested the province designate the reserve a provincial park before it loses its protected status in 2010 and expand the park s proposed boundaries to include 160 000 hectares to protect more wetlands and boreal bogs Earlier this year CPAWS and Fisher River renewed that plea We ve received support from players of all political stripes Conservative Selkirk Interlake MP James Bezan Conservation Minister Bill Blaikie when he was still an MP provincial Liberal leader Jon Gerrard and the Green Party said Thiessen The province has received more than 11 000 letters from Manitobans supporting the park and we ve had an incredible amount of support from the Jackhead First Nation Town of Arborg Village of Riverton and RM of Coldwell The province which is currently consulting with local stakeholders and the

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/371/fisher-river-provincial-park-benefits (2016-02-09)
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  • » Bloodvein band joins UNESCO bid | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    The band located 210 kilometres north of Winnipeg on the east side of Lake Winnipeg is adding about half its traditional territory to the protected area which is already the size of Belgium The four bands Poplar River Pauingassi and Little Grand Rapids in Manitoba and Pikangikum in Ontario are preparing a bid due in 2012 to turn a huge swath of virgin boreal forest into a UNESCO site The

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/367/bloodvein-band-joins-unesco-bid (2016-02-09)
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  • » Bloodvein River supports protection of boreal forest | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation Home Bloodvein River supports protection of boreal forest Comment on this Story Email This Story Bloodvein River supports protection of boreal forest December 23rd 2009 Source Wawatay News Chris Kornacki Bloodvein River First Nation has become an active member of Pimachiowin Aki Corp joining with four other First Nations to have a portion of the Manitoba Ontario boreal forest designated an UNESCO World Heritage Site The four other First Nations are Pikangikum Poplar River Pauingassi and Little Grand Rapids Bloodvein River s decision means that additional lands will be added to the UNESCO project planning area Bloodvein River anticipates more than 50 per cent of its traditional territory will be added to the 40 000 square kilometers currently in the project s area Our community knows that a World Heritage Site can help protect the boreal forest and our culture We want to be closely involved in the development of the nomination to UNESCO and in the future management of this potential new World Heritage Site said William Young a spokesperson for Bloodvein River The UNESCO nomination document for World Heritage Site is due in 2012 Be Sociable

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/365/bloodvein-river-supports-protection-of-boreal-forest (2016-02-09)
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  • » Manitoba First Nations Support International Resolution to Protect More than Half of the Boreal | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    stores more than 208 billion tons of carbon which if released would be equivalent to 26 years worth of global fossil fuel emissions at 2006 levels But when the Boreal is developed or logged its ability to absorb and store carbon is lost or reduced which degrades its ability to help moderate our climate As the world s largest storehouse of carbon the Boreal is helping us all in the fight against climate change by keeping greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere said Thiessen Fisher River Cree Nation supports the resolution and is working with CPAWS to establish a provincial park around the south basin of Lake Winnipeg As well as the global significance of keeping the Boreal healthy it s important locally to maintain traditional activities such as fishing hunting and gathering along with emerging eco and cultural tourism opportunities said Fisher River s Chief David Crate CPAWS also points to the east side of Lake Winnipeg where First Nations are striving to establish a World Heritage Site Poplar River First Nation a partner in the initiative has completed their land use plan which includes permanently protecting 8000 square kilometers of their traditional territory from industrial developments Sophia Rabliauskas member of Poplar River and spokesperson for the World Heritage Site initiative values the land and recognizes the fundamental need to protect the Boreal Region Our elders recognize the spiritual significance and traditional values of the land The land gives wisdom and knowledge and heals us said Sophia Our vision is to protect the land and water for future generations and that s why we support this resolution CPAWS is asking the province to make protection of more than half of Manitoba s Boreal Region a key objective in the Manitoba Boreal Peatlands Stewardship Strategy a commitment recently announced by

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/363/manitoba-first-nations-support-international-resolution-to-protect-more-than-half-of-the-boreal (2016-02-09)
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