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  • » Tour Canada’s Boreal Forest » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Lessons from the Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Tour Canada s Boreal Forest To A Friend Email a copy of Tour Canada s Boreal Forest to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your Remark Friend s Name

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/738/tour-canadas-boreal-forest/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Protecting the Bloodvein River » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Wilson Lessons from the Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Protecting the Bloodvein River To A Friend Email a copy of Protecting the Bloodvein River to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your Remark Friend s Name Separate

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/736/protecting-the-bloodvein-river/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Stories | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    topics including environmental monitoring research and education His commitment lies in working for people as well as the environment a responsibility that involves all of the earth s creations He believes that all beings are equal and in an effort to live by this belief he seeks to maintain sustainable relationships the true expression of respect A member of the Long Lake First Nation in Ontario and descendent to a line of chiefs and medicine men Mike was not always in touch with his Aboriginal cosmology The son of residential school survivors Mike had to live his early life removed from his traditional Cree and Ojibway Read the rest of this story Posted in Stories No Comments Here We Go Again An Interview with William Young Here we go again says William Young former Chief of Bloodvein First Nation through a somewhat disparaged chuckle as he tells me about a recent visit from Manitoba Hydro to his community The crown corporation recently made it known that they wanted to run a long transmission line Bi Pole III through the boreal forest of Bloodvein First Nation s traditional territory on the east side of Lake Winnipeg According to Young when Manitoba Hydro came to Bloodvein to consult with the community they were informed by its members that something would be expected in return if the new transmission line were to run through their territory Hydro was not receptive to the community s proposal which included revenue sharing on the billions of dollars Hydro stood to make with the plan says Young so they left In other words Manitoba Hydro came to the community wanting Read the rest of this story Posted in Stories No Comments Fisher River Cree Nation Guardians of Mother Earth Growing up in Manitoba s Interlake you can t help but have an appreciation of the wilderness around you If you are away from it for any period of time the lake itself calls to you Its influence is age old and bone deep Fisher River Cree Nation FRCN understands this connection to Mother Earth In 1999 FRCN asked the Government of Manitoba to create an area to be protected from industrial developments The government designated an 89 000 ha area a park reserve which is now protected from development until 2010 when a final designation is to be made FRCN continued to look at ecological studies and to consider community values In 2006 they increased their request to include 160 000 hectares though this additional area has yet to be included within the park reserve and asked that it become the Ochiwasahow Fisher Bay Read the rest of this story Posted in Stories No Comments Ron Campbell When the sun sets and hits the trees to the west Ron Campbell was only two when his life was forever changed by the construction of the Grand Rapids hydroelectric dam near his community of Moose Lake Manitoba He is by no means the only one affected by this so

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/category/stories/page/3 (2016-02-09)
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  • » Medicine Wheel Teachings | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    and the lesson of safety that our parents must provide for us Along the wheel to the South as children in that quadrant we become teachers and are always asking Why When arranged in the Medicine Wheel diagram on paper we see that opposite the child in the South sits the Grandparents in the North who have gathered enough life experience to answer those many why s that we have as children That is why Grandparents actively participate in the raising of the young ones while the parents are busy providing After childhood we become Youth and Teens where we begin to search for Truth and in our quest for Truth we may rebel or challenge parents authority teachers elders etc It is here that our Teens and Youth would seek out the guidance and advice of the Elders when they are attempting to find Truth Next is the Young Adult stage It is in this stage that a young person would seek to find their role in the community and work to fulfill that role doing the work of the people In the Western direction we become parents and our role and responsibility now is to provide including providing that safety to those toddlers we identified in the early stages of the Eastern direction Parenting is supported by the Grandparents and the immediate circle of influence including Brothers and Sisters Aunties and Uncles Next to that influence and just as important are the Elders Clans Community and Nation We learn about who we are and what we are responsible for from these influences After parenthood we graduate into the Northern direction where we become grandparents Our role is to love teach and nurture the babies the toddlers and the children Tree spirits always grow in one direction towards the sky A tree will live its entire life giving us this teaching as it practises all that it knows to live and grow honestly always reaching towards the Creator At the end of the journey through the Medicine Wheel and life we move into our final phase the Elder phase Here we share our knowledge and understanding gained over a lifetime of experience We offer spiritual guidance and direction to those at other stages of the wheel making their way through the journey We acknowledge and respect all things animate and inanimate because we understand through our teachings that spirit lives in everything the Creator made We gain these unique understandings through the teachings the language and the ceremonies In a pipe ceremony those old ones or elders that sit in the North they hold the pipe stem vertically acknowledging those tree s and the teachings of Honesty Tree spirits always grow in one direction towards the sky A tree will live its entire life giving us this teaching as it practises all that it knows to live and grow honestly always reaching towards the Creator The pipe stem is made from the inner trunk of the tree and represents

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/526/medicine-wheel-teachings (2016-02-09)
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  • » Traditional Knowledge Key in Planning for the Future | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    course helps when dealing with industry and government By collecting traditional knowledge land use in Wesley s traditional territory such as the prospective development in the Horn River Basin can therefore be guided by the advice of community residents rather than dictated from outside interests From his experience working with the local lands department conducting traditional knowledge surveys Wesley was hired by Treaty 8 First Nation in a term position acting as a Liaison between his community of Fort Nelson First Nation and Treaty 8 regarding a proposed hydroelectric dam on the Peace River Wesley met with residents to learn about their questions and concerns regarding the proposed dam While meeting with residents Wesley received a wide variety of reaction Some are very eager to share and help spread their knowledge Some are suspicious to what were using it for and whose going to have control of it Some are willing to share some are hostile and some are shy We are losing so many Elders right now that there is a good chance that my traditional language will die out If we can t keep our knowledge living through people who can speak it then we have to get the second best by recording the knowledge The philosophy and view point from First Nations people is that we are not above and it is not our place to say how nature shall be or the way animals shall be Rather our viewpoint is observational After meeting with his community it was evident that Wesley as well as his community had many questions regarding the reason and timing of the proposed dam the impacts that it would have on species previously affected by industrial development and were curious who in the long run would ultimately benefit from developing Fort Nelson First Nation s undeveloped traditional territories Wesley believes that most questions and concerns ultimately boiled down to Must the first peoples of this land be displaced and impacted for the benefit and accommodation of urbanites and their excesses How much more can we give Where do we have left to go The information collected was documented and submitted by Wesley as a traditional knowledge report to government and industry with the hopes that his people s advice and concerns would be respected in determining the fate of this megaproject However the B C Government recently finalized their decision to go ahead with the proposed hydroelectric dam on the Peace River Sadly the community s advice had little to no effect on the outcome The information collected from residents did not impact where the dam is going Community input was not used or acknowledged the way it should have been Despite some setbacks Wesley continues to seek traditional knowledge His current work with the Assembly of First Nations is on an advisory group to Environment Canada focusing on a recovery strategy for the boreal woodland caribou The woodland caribou are an endangered as well as protected species in Fort Nelson First

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/517/traditional-knowledge-key-in-planning-for-the-future (2016-02-09)
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  • » Sam Murdock | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    why Fisher River Cree Nation is attempting to permanently protect the area in the form of a provincial park Murdock explains that there are snake dens that rival the well known Narcisse snake dens just north of Teulon Manitoba He also relates quite an interesting spectacle that can occur in the fall Once the lakes freeze and before the snow falls one can witness fish migrating under the ice Their sleek shapes visible skirting among the vegetation moving on the current There is a lot of opportunity with this park Ecotourism is a big thing that will take off It s already started in different areas but its position will be solidified especially with a provincial park being there A healthy forest bordered in areas by natural sandy beaches and the waters of the tenth largest freshwater lake in the world Lake Winnipeg the proposed park boundaries envelope some of the most important wildlife habitat in the province Elk bald eagles shorebirds like the endangered Piping Plover black bear and Little Brown Bats all inhabit what could be a provincial park as soon as the fall of 2010 People would travel thousands of miles to be here and spend a lot of money to do so There is a lot of opportunity with this park Ecotourism is a big thing that will take off It s already started in different areas but its position will be solidified especially with a provincial park being there In protecting Fisher Bay or Ochiwasahow Fisher River Cree Nation is sharing their traditional boreal forest territory with the world Not only will the ecological services such as water purification and carbon storage important to all people be retained but Fisher River Cree Nation is also sharing their stories Elders keepers of their ancestor s knowledge

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/481/sam-murdock (2016-02-09)
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  • » Boreal Bats Excite Aboriginal Youth | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    up below the surface to large cavernous rooms This characteristic makes it difficult to locate the caves and as a result their total number remains a mystery By far the most important of the known sites in the province houses 25 000 bats each winter and is adjacent to the proposed Ochiwasahow or Fisher Bay provincial park The proposed park area includes abundant forests including old growth which is ideal summer habitat for maternity colonies of little brown bats The greatest threat to the Little Brown Bat is the loss of their habitat Fisher River Cree Nation is working to protect the area by asking the government to establish a Fisher Bay provincial park Protecting the caves as well as the surrounding boreal forest is essential for the survival of Little Brown Bats Enthused to learn of their wild neighbours this is what the students had to say I didn t know that there were caves with bats in them Dylon 15 yrs old Fisher Bay should be a park so we could go look to see if there are any brown bats Jaynee 9 Fisher Bay should become a park because it is beautiful Amelia 10 I ve learned that there are many of species of bats in Fisher Bay Avery 14 If Fisher Bay became a park there would be more tourist attractions and more people would come to the area Josh 17 My favorite part of the presentation was when we heard what bats sound like Dylon 15 A park would be important so the animals could live longer Prezlee 15 The park would help with pollution Keaton 10 If you don t protect the area if humans bug them bats there won t be bats They don t like to be disturbed Kailey 14 A park

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/459/boreal-bats-excite-aboriginal-youth (2016-02-09)
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  • » Morning Star Gone, Legacy Lives On | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    I visited his home in Hollow Water First Nation to discuss the potential of the Manigotagan River and surrounding area being protected in a provincial park He welcomed me with open arms and I soon became impressed by Garry s vast knowledge and strong desire to protect the Boreal Forest from industrial developments Since our first meeting the Manigotagan River park has been formed and I have spent many days chatting with Garry and attending inspiring gatherings at Ravens Creek Ti pi Village his home and teaching place Garry took many of his visitors on walks to locate traditional medicines and explain their uses He also taught individuals and groups about Aboriginal spirituality and customs Garry is known widely for his extreme high temperature sweat lodges I fondly remember the times Garry took me up the Wanipigow River to capture and share its beauty through photography I also have warm memories of the mornings we spent drinking coffee and discussing our perspectives on global and local issues I miss Garry dearly His star burned out too soon He was only 61 years old My words here only scratch the surface of Garry s life and legacy He will live on

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/392/morning-star-gone-legacy-lives-on (2016-02-09)
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