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  • » Bloodvein River First Nation joins efforts to protect Boreal Forest through World Heritage Site | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    its trees and soils thereby keeping it away from the atmosphere It also produces much of the world s oxygen and fresh water In the Heart of the Boreal First Nations people have maintained an intimate relationship with the landscape in which their lives continue to depend World Heritage Status would place the area on the east side of Lake Winnipeg among such wonders as the pyramids of Egypt and Australia s Great Barrier Reef I see it as a huge benefit to our First Nation and the other First Nations involved It s a very unique opportunity and of significance that both the Ontario and Manitoba provincial governments are involved and have made commitments giving us the opportunity to designate our traditional territory towards a World Heritage Site In terms of protection management is the key word from a First Nations perspective We want to establish economic opportunities eco tourism opportunities sustainable opportunities for the membership here at the community level Young indicates that a World Heritage Site can help protect the boreal forest as well as the cultural landscape by forwarding sustainable development initiatives such as eco tourism Involved in Eastside Aboriginal Sustainable Tourism E A S T Incorporated an economic development initiative supporting the development and expansion of Aboriginal tourism businesses on the east side of Lake Winnipeg Young is also owner of Bloodvein River Lodge which provides activities in addition to fishing such as teachings about First Nation s values and history Citing his grandfather s wisdom Young says that the encroachment of industrial activities is always a concern and he hopes to protect his traditional territory and to manage it for the needs of the community In terms of protection management is the key word from a First Nations perspective We want to establish economic opportunities eco tourism opportunities sustainable opportunities for the membership here at the community level The boreal forest has sustained the communities on the east side of Lake Winnipeg for thousands of years Recognizing that the future of their culture is tied directly to the land the hope is that protecting Pimachiowin Aki meaning the land that gives life as a World Heritage Site will provide employment opportunities while maintaining the ecological health of the boreal In a land where people have been stewards of the environment for millennia Pimachiowin Aki World Heritage Site will ideally protect the natural and cultural values to be shared with the peoples of the world now and in the future Bloodvein River First Nation is in the process of conducting its community based land use plan required for the World Heritage Site and anticipates its completion in a year A nomination document that includes the final boundaries and management plan for Pimachiowin Aki is expected to be completed in 2011 Be Sociable Share Tweet You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2 0 feed You can leave a response or trackback from your own site 3 Responses to Bloodvein River First

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/383/bloodvein-river-first-nation-joins-efforts-to-protect-boreal-forest-through-world-heritage-site (2016-02-09)
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  • » Shawna Snache | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    time when our most precious resources are being threatened on a daily basis if we don t act it will be the generations yet to come who will suffer for our ignorance and greed If we don t pressure our elected officials to police industry and corporations they will continue to exploit in the name of profit without any repercussions or consequences It s a terribly sad cycle that we can only begin to challenge and when we as a people decide that we will not stand for irresponsible industrial activities any longer It s important that we expose the truth and educate while we advocate for our natural resources Teaching our children the importance of being stewards of the environment will stay with them as they grow and begin to fill the roles of the future If we don t pressure our elected officials to police industry and corporations they will continue to exploit in the name of profit without any repercussions or consequences Teaching our children the importance of being stewards of the environment will stay with them as they grow and begin to fill the roles of the future Shawna s community as well as her husband s has been directly affected by the destruction caused by industrial activities According to Shawna her husband s community of N daki Menan or the Teme Augama Anishnabai have seen most of their family lands boreal forests rich in natural resources displaced by mining and logging activities Shawna s community of Georgina Island First Nation an island community in the middle of Ontario s Lake Simcoe also faces environmental destruction The lake s health is at risk due to phosphorus overloading which causes eutrophication killing aquatic life its watershed supports a population of roughly half a million people including the

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/303/shawna-snache (2016-02-09)
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  • » Fred Stevens | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    that promote a healthy lifestyle for youth adults and elders The camps take place in Manitoba s Norman Region about four miles from the community of Misipawistik Cree Nation where tents are set up in the boreal forest The youth are taught survival skills and positive teachings Fred explains to the participants This camp is yours It is whatever you put into it so it s up to you and what you want to get out of it Fred wants to make sure the experience is provided even if it is never used The exposure to the Elders wisdom through their stories and teachings around the campfire is important for it is through oral storytelling that information is passed to the generations Nothing is in writing Fred attests We depend on Mother Earth Our brothers and sisters depend on her when I say brothers and sisters I mean the plants the trees the four legged animals everything is interconnected For Fred a healthy lifestyle encompasses mind body and spirit Showing the youth basic harvesting of cedar to make a smudge used for spiritual purification he tells them the first thing they must do is to make an offering to Mother Earth for the medicine they will be picking You must give before you take he asserts Listen That is the main lesson throughout the experience I m learning too Learning to be patient humble A Teaching Sweetgrass the hair of Mother Earth is a teaching tool that Fred openly shares with old and young To him sweetgrass represents kindness Found along the lakeshore where it is hand picked sweetgrass can grow up to four feet long Fred shows people how to braid the strands together which is not only a physical act but a mental and spiritual one The three

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/298/fred-stevens-2 (2016-02-09)
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  • » Kailee Carr | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    I was only twelve years old when it happened But I remember it like it was yesterday I thought to myself as my mind wandered back to that warm summer day seventy one years ago One morning I was out picking salmon berries near my village and I got lost in the woods As it turned out the forest was quite a large place and after walking for hours I wasn t able to find the end of it There were a few polite smiles in the audience as I began my account Most of the people here were listening intently some out of interest others out of obligation but on my far right there was one who sat with his arms crossed over his chest and a frown I smiled at him I had never spent a night alone in the woods before I was scared I began to search for shelter moving through the army of fir trees with my heart racing and then it stopped Now in my culture wolves are highly regarded animals hunters by nature they are dangerous and I knew my fate was uncertain After hours of walking my legs felt very tired and when I looked up through the canopy of trees I realized that the blue sky above me was starting to fade With the summer season coming to an end the temperature became cold after the sun went down and I had never spent a night alone in the woods before I was scared I began to search for shelter moving through the army of fir trees with my heart racing and then it stopped I paused and looked around the room all eyes were on me I came across a wolf standing alone beside a giant fir tree and like any wolf this one was wondering what I was doing so deep in the forest all by myself As the gray wolf smiled menacingly back at me I knew I had to approach Wolf with great care so I immediately offered up the only thing I had my basket of full of berries Now in my culture wolves are highly regarded animals hunters by nature they are dangerous and I knew my fate was uncertain but in return for my politeness Wolf decided to help me find my way back home Are you saying you talked to a wolf a voice interrupted in disbelief Well I certainly didn t text the wolf I returned easily as a few laughs rang out in the crowd Noting the doubt in some of the faces around me I continued on with my story It was very dark when we finally got near my village and I was so relieved to be home that I promised to give Wolf anything but Wolf only asked that I always help keep the forest healthy So I gave my word to Wolf that for as long as I lived I would be his helper as he had

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/286/kailee-carr (2016-02-09)
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  • » Interview with Dan Thomas | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    these years Dan made a powerful connection to Midewiwin something he would later realize was the most powerful vehicle for him as an educator But this was not the first time Midewiwin came into his life In fact it had a way of coming up time and again since his grandmother had started to pass on the teachings when he was a young child of about four years old She told me that I had a responsibility not to let it go She gave me the teachings necessary to be part of it but when I was little it seemed so big Everyone seemed to be going right when I decided to go left at the request of an old lady says Thomas with a chuckle Now a fourth degree Midewinini and a Research and Development Specialist with the Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Center MFNERC Dan Thomas works from a place that values spirituality traditional ways of life and an appreciation for a broader context of history All of history is important and that s the big lesson We have to look at all of it and see how it all fits together We need to look globally and respond globally says Thomas explaining the philosophical thrust of his work At MFNERC this idea is enshrined in the tools and services they offer ranging from the school courses they have developed and sent out to schools that utilize traditional activities to meet the demands of modern school curricula posters on First Nation values and a book on First Nation teachings We also have a First Nations law course and have completed a workbook on teaching mathematics specifically geometry through the process of creating star blankets adds Thomas We are also working on units that study traditional hunting trapping fishing and gathering These units will highlight the traditional teachings that are transferable to other aspects of life We are also working on other courses that involve traditional activities such as teaching math and geometry through the process of creating star blankets and are completing videos on treaties says Thomas later adding that a unit on Education for Sustainable Development for First Nations schools is also in development As far as I understand when our people signed treaties with the Crown there was some understanding as to how the land and water would be looked after but when settlers saw the boreal forest as a bunch of trees that needed cutting it became a free for all Actually in every resource area the settlers seemed to have depleted the resources It is certainly a mission that could have significant implications for boreal forests under constant pressure from industrialization and for First Nation communities on the east side of Lake Winnipeg still struggling to adjust to the ways of the colonial Europeans Given the connection many communities have maintained with the boreal forest they have called home for generations empowering the communities with knowledge taught from traditional activities will likely serve to

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/276/interview-with-dan-thomas (2016-02-09)
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  • » Dr. Peggy Wilson and Dr. Stan Wilson: Land-based Education » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Dr Peggy Wilson and Dr Stan Wilson Land based Education To A Friend Email a copy of Dr Peggy Wilson and Dr Stan Wilson Land based Education to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/634/dr-peggy-wilson-and-dr-stan-wilson-land-based-education/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Chief Derek Nepinak » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Peigi Wilson Lessons from the Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Chief Derek Nepinak To A Friend Email a copy of Chief Derek Nepinak to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your Remark Friend s Name Separate multiple

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/623/chief-derek-nepinak/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Maria M’Lot » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Peigi Wilson Lessons from the Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Maria M Lot To A Friend Email a copy of Maria M Lot to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your Remark Friend s Name Separate multiple

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/558/maria-m%e2%80%99lot/email/ (2016-02-09)
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