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  • » Valerie Courtois » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Responsibility Peigi Wilson Lessons from the Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Valerie Courtois To A Friend Email a copy of Valerie Courtois to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your Remark Friend s Name Separate multiple entries

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/539/valerie-courtois/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » Kaaren Dannenmann » E-Mail | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Responsibility Peigi Wilson Lessons from the Land of the Sleeping Giant An Interview with Liz Esquega Thomas Beaudry View all stories The Project About the Project Contact Us This project was supported by a grant from The Winnipeg Foundation E Mail Kaaren Dannenmann To A Friend Email a copy of Kaaren Dannenmann to a friend Required Field Your Name Your E Mail Your Remark Friend s Name Separate multiple entries

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/stories/534/kaaren-dannenmann/email/ (2016-02-09)
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  • » In the News | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    outstanding support for the park gives the province a silver platter opportunity to protect this diverse and beautiful area for future generations of people and wildlife Located two hours north of Winnipeg the Fisher Bay region is home to wildlife such as bears moose fox Read the rest of this story Posted in In the News No Comments etters to the Editor Boreal wilderness Re Province accused of dragging its feet on wilderness park Oct 2 The Manitoba government s request to delay the designation of a provincial park in Fisher Bay is unacceptable on several grounds Environmentally speaking Fisher Bay is a healthy boreal wilderness many rare and threatened species make it their home Only a small part approximately seven per cent of Manitoba is permanently protected from industrial developments This is woefully inadequate to ensure healthy ecosystems Politically speaking there has been a groundswell of support for this park Finally and in a somewhat broader context given the state of Lake Winnipeg s health the government should be progressing on protecting land and water in its basin and watershed for the future well being of the lake Establishing the Fisher Bay park would help fulfil this objective ROGER RITSEMA Winnipeg Posted in In the News No Comments PROVINCE ANNOUNCES PLANS FOR ABORIGINAL INTERPRETIVE LEARNING CENTRE Waabanong Anishinaabe Interpretive Learning Centre will Offer Unique Interactive Experience for Visitors from Manitoba and the World Selinger HOLLOW WATER FIRST NATION A first of its kind attraction in Manitoba will teach international visitors about our province s rich natural and cultural heritage through the eyes of the Aboriginal people of Manitoba Premier Greg Selinger announced at a site dedication ceremony held near here today with community elders and schoolchildren We have much to learn from the indigenous people of Manitoba about the importance of protecting our natural and cultural treasures for future generations said Selinger The Waabanong Anishinaabe Interpretive Learning Centre will provide a suitable location for that learning to take place at the gateway to Manitoba s east side an area recognized internationally as the heart of the world s last remaining intact boreal forest The centre will be the first of several education and tourism opportunities expected to be developed jointly with Aboriginal communities over the Read the rest of this story Posted in In the News No Comments Manitoba stalling on new park groups say Native and environmental groups are angry the province has backed away from creating a new provincial park around Fisher Bay The groups claim they were led to believe a provincial park would be created but are concerned the government wants to extend a consultation process on the matter by five years It is time for the government to quit stalling and establish the Fisher Bay park now David Crate the chief of the Fisher River Cree Nation said Friday Crate said his community is considering its options If the park isn t established and government s not serious on protecting this area then we

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/category/news/page/3 (2016-02-09)
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  • » Pimachiowin Aki leaders take Canadian successes to New Zealand and the international stage | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    also struggling with how to work with other interests groups in efforts to protect the land It was amazing how similar our stories and our connections with the land are with the Maori we met After the conference we traveled to their traditional lands and a UNESCO site and it was clear they have the same connection with the land that our people have They face the same challenges trying to figure out how to work with government and environmentalists to take care of the land We showed them how we re working on land use plans with the support of our governments and they were impressed said Pimachiowin Aki spokesperson Sophia Rabliauskas raw BLOUSE kiss Rabliauskas attended the Sharing Power Conference with Pimachiowin Aki team members Elder Oliver Hill and his Ojibwe translator Dean Peters from Ontario s Pikangikum First Nation and Pimachiowin Aki researcher Dr Iain Davidson Hunt who is a faculty member of the Natural Resources Institute University of Manitoba Before going on this trip I thought that New Zealand was further ahead in terms of partnering with the Maori for the management of protected areas However at the meeting it became apparent that conservation in both New Zealand and Canada as well as elsewhere still struggles to live up to current international policies regarding indigenous peoples and protected areas said Davidson Hunt who is also the North American Vice Chair of the Commission on Environmental Economic and Social Policy of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature The conference was also a good opportunity to show case the Pimachiowin Aki World Heritage Project to international experts some who are involved in evaluation of UNESCO World Heritage proposals such as the International Union for Conservation of Nature IUCN that co sponsored the conference As a special

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/711/pimachiowin-aki-leaders-new-zealand (2016-02-09)
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  • » CCPA Review: Critics of Hydro/Government plans for Bipole III lack credibility | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Collinson 18 Engineers Claim 1 Government decision on West Side based on incomplete environmental picture Available information suggests that the early recommendations for the east side route referred to by the engineers were based almost entirely on cost and distance factors less cost shorter distance and environmental and socio economic factors were either ignored or discounted It was only when these factors were included in the analysis which recognized the intrinsic value of the East Side and the potential negative impacts the BiPole line would have on it that the focus shifted to a possible west side route The value in East Side is in the sum of its parts The East Side of Lake Winnipeg is one of the last remaining ecological intact forests left in the world and abounds with intact watersheds of rivers lakes and wetlands that are significant habitat for migratory birds breeding waterfowl bird populations and boreal songbirds It is also critical habitat for endangered woodland caribou populations and other important boreal indicator species Does the presence of roads as argued by the retired engineers compromise this totality Of course but the roads are to benefit the First Nations peoples who are also part of the ecosys tem the roads will be constructed largely where the existing winter road system is and therefore very little new linear disturbances will occur BiPole transmission lines cannot be put in the same category as roads that provides for the delivery of affordable food and basic services to these communities that we in Southern Manitoba take for granted Claim 2 Government concerns about gaining UNESCO World Heritage Site Status for boreal forest on East Side is overblown The arguments of both Collinson and the en gineers downplay the significance of satisfying the criteria established to obtain World Heritage Site Sta tus In particular they ignore the fact that when the application was submitted by Manitoba Ontario and First Nations no reference was made to the possibility of having a new transmission line Bipole III in the area for which the designation is being sought The engineers contention that the government s decision to build all weather roads in the area means that the bodies that evaluate applications for UNES CO Site are flexible and would likely also be prepared to accommodate a transmission line is based on con jecture only In fact the International Union for the Conservation of Nature IUCN clearly states that the Outstanding Universal Values the key to receiving UNESCO World Heritage site designation is based on the ecologically and cultural intactness of this site Running BiPole through the heart of this site would not only jeopardize the Outstanding Universal Value but the nomination itself The other point they ignore is that the all weather roads would be built on rights of way already used for winter roads As a result there would not be a major change from the situation that already exists for most of the length of the road The new roads will

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/707/ccpa-review-critics-of-hydrogovernment-plans-for-bipole-iii-lack-credibility (2016-02-09)
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  • » Province designates two new provincial parks | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    larger than Winnipeg Premier Greg Selinger said The Colvin Lake Provincial Park known as the Land of Little Sticks protects a total of 163 070 hectares Nueltin Lake Provincial Park totals 447 190 hectares Both fall in an area of transition between boreal forest and the tundra and are within the traditional hunting and trapping territories of the Northlands Denesuline First Nation and Sayisi Dene First Nation Chief Joe Dantouze of the Northlands Denesuline First Nation said the wilderness area designation means both areas will be protected from development such as mineral exploration and mining Lands included in a wilderness land use category under the Provincial Parks Act also legally prohibit commercial logging hydroelectric development oil and gas development and any other activities that may significantly or adversely affect habitat The designation also means the Qamanirjuaq barren ground caribou herd has a better chance of recovery after seeing its numbers drop substantially in recent years The province also says Nueltin Lake and Colvin Lake parks store an estimated 126 million tonnes of carbon the equivalent to the emissions of 2 5 million cars in 10 years Selinger also said the designation of these parks sees the percentage of Manitoba lands

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/703/province-designates-two-new-provincial-parks (2016-02-09)
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  • » Efforts to help Lake Winnipeg get B.C. partner | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    what worked in the Columbia River watershed will aid our ailing lake Bruce Smith of the Lake Winnipeg Foundation said that s why the local foundation has joined forces with B C based Wildsight to create the Living Lakes Network Canada They have a good track record with the Columbia River and they are 15 years old and we re five Smith said on Monday after a press conference announcing a two day summit dealing with Lake Winnipeg The two day conference starting today is pulling together government officials business leaders academics and students Heather Leschied program director of Wildsight said the idea to create a national group came when they started giving advice to the Lake Winnipeg Foundation Wildsight has been working for years to reduce nutrients in the Columbia River watershed She said one of the first priorities of the new national group is helping Lake Winnipeg In recent years the lake s shoreline has been covered with thick blooms of blue green algae and large portions of the lake have been covered with the algae The algae is caused by nutrients in the lake such as phosphorous and nitrogen Bob Sandford chairman of the Canadian Partnership Initiative in support of United Nations Water for Life Decade and a member of the RBC Blue Water Project s advisory panel said a national organization is coming together at the right time for Lake Winnipeg We can learn a great deal from other s mistakes Sandford said Leschied said the first thing done to help the Columbia River watershed was to survey its fish habitat marshland and shorelines As well she said Wildsight built a community supported system of water stewardship along the river s headwaters region Meanwhile while the conference itself is closed the public is invited to a

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/698/efforts-to-help-lake-winnipeg-get-b-c-partner (2016-02-09)
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  • » Caribou Survival Depends on Ancient Cultural Knowledge | Aboriginal Boreal Conservation Leaders
    Canada s federal government listed the boreal woodland caribou as threatened in 2002 and started a series of investigations to ensure its long term health and survival Woodland caribou have lost nearly all of their historical range in the continental United States as well much of southern Canada An icon of the north the caribou s success is an indicator of the health of the Canadian boreal the world s largest remaining intact forest But to the indigenous people whose history is one shared completely and intimately with this species they are more than that For millennia northern indigenous people could not have survived without an abundance of caribou Some scientists even believe that the first people to cross the Bering Land Bridge into North America may have been in pursuit of migratory caribou herds Caribou skins made tents cords clothing moccasins rugs and countless other items Caribou meat was an essential large food source and its bones and horns were fashioned into tools For hundreds of indigenous communities spread across Canada s boreal and arctic regions the loss of caribou from their lands and culture would be the loss of their identity and a severing of a vital link to their ancestral past Last month at the 2010 North American Caribou Workshop in Winnipeg Manitoba an academic conference supported in part by the Pew Environment Group s Canadian Boreal Initiative the effort to protect the caribou took a hopeful new direction The meeting has historically been attended largely by scientists without much representation from indigenous communities Aboriginal Knowledge Western Science This year s meeting was different Attracting 400 attendees compared to the previous meeting s 125 it included discussions of traditional Aboriginal knowledge and perspectives alongside presentations of traditional western science In a session one might listen to an academic biologist discuss the results of a statistical model that elucidated the ecological limiting factors of caribou populations followed by a Cree or Dene chief sharing his people s history with caribou and how it shapes their community today The presentations documented the decline of caribou in North America which was well under way by the late 1800s The woodland caribou had become by the early 1900s only a lost memory of the northeastern United States and Canadian Maritime Provinces where it once roamed Soon after that it disappeared from the U S side of the Great Lakes and except for a few dozen in eastern Washington from the U S northern Rocky Mountain range as well The loss continued tracking north in Canada so that in Ontario the species range has retracted at a rate of two miles a year since 1880 resulting in the loss of half of the province s woodland caribou range Sixty percent of caribou range has been lost in Alberta and 40 percent in British Columbia More recently massive declines in the numbers of the barren ground caribou the long distance migratory form have also been documented in many herds Some of these declines

    Original URL path: http://www.abcleaders.org/news/692/caribou-survival-depends-on-ancient-cultural-knowledge (2016-02-09)
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