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  • Code Bubbles
    am Permalink Cool It looks like Smalltalk Self meets OneNote Google Wave It also seems related to what Bill Griswold was doing with the AspectBrowser and Information Transparency The original Self demo had some nice animations too I give this one a good shot of being straight Java 2D Why Because if you want it done right you have to do it yourself Jonathan Edwards Posted March 13 2010 at 9 20 pm Permalink The polish and fluidity of this UI would take a LOT of work in Java2D I am sticking by my guns this is Silverlight or WPF not Java Care to make a friendly wager Dinner on the loser Macneil Shonle Posted March 13 2010 at 10 00 pm Permalink It s a deal provided what loser pays is vegan John Z Bo Zabroski Posted March 14 2010 at 9 53 pm Permalink Falafels and hommus official dinner food of Onward 2010 John Z Bo Zabroski Posted March 14 2010 at 9 52 pm Permalink If he wrapped Java2D with a functional reactive programming interface like Adrian Quark s then it might be doable Again don t rule out that he rolled his own But he is borrowing Eclipse code so the only way for him to do this in WPF or Silverlight would be if he called Eclipse through IKVM Actually that would NOT be a bad idea as Eclipse has way better and more comprehensive APIs than SharpDevelop Preston L Bannister Posted March 13 2010 at 12 17 am Permalink The Code Bubbles demo is built on Eclipse and uses Eclipse functions to do some of the bits demoed Apparently this is more than just a demo They asked for programmers to give it a try I signed up Jesse Dickey Posted March 15 2010 at 9 02 pm Permalink Awesome I want it And I want it built into every IDE I will use Suman K Posted March 16 2010 at 2 46 am Permalink I am glad that you liked it I am one of the co authors of the paper The front end is done in C and WPF The back end is an eclipse plugin java The front end and back end communicate via XML RPC Jonathan Edwards Posted March 16 2010 at 7 25 am Permalink Nice work Suman I am looking forward to learning more about it Macneil Shonle Posted March 16 2010 at 7 53 am Permalink Looks like I owe you a falafel John Z Bo Zabroski Posted March 16 2010 at 9 47 am Permalink Don t be stingy on the cooking oil grapeseed oil only Jonathan Edwards Posted March 22 2010 at 7 46 am Permalink Update Andrew Bragdon informs me that they used C WPF but are in the process of porting to Java Swing to improve portability and performance He says WPF is better for rapid prototyping and that it is a lot more work to use Swing for some things It will

    Original URL path: http://alarmingdevelopment.org/?p=361 (2016-04-30)
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  • Typed Subtext
    implementation mechanism masquerading as a feature John Z Bo Zabroski Posted March 4 2010 at 12 22 pm Permalink Can you clarify your comment on inheritance I would say that the biggest problem with inheritance in most all object oriented third generation programming languages is the notion of IS A data modeling and categorizing operators like instanceof reference as object oriented which is an ontology error and also goes against the flexibility of using objects to perform simulations John Z Bo Zabroski Posted March 4 2010 at 2 40 pm Permalink To finish my thought above please see Wegner and Zdonik s paper Inheritance as an incremental modification mechanism or what like is and isn t like http portal acm org citation cfm id 60605 This paper is different from the Liskov Substitution Principle paper and discusses safe substitution mechanisms in object oriented languages thus avoiding thorny issues with visibility modifiers There is still the fact that reusing behavior requires a trustworthy mechanism for reuse e g using separation logic such as that advocated by Matt Parkinson e g the paper Separation logic abstraction and inheritance although Matt s abstract starts off in the first sentence with a classification error Inheritance is a fundamental concept in object oriented programming the rest of the paper is quite good John Z Bo Zabroski Posted March 4 2010 at 12 11 pm Permalink A denotational semantics of inheritance is much cleaner than the messy operational semantics given in most object oriented third generation languages Please see William Cook s 1989 Ph D thesis for motivating lesson This of course does not solve open closed problems in code sharing and reuse Inheritance in most modern languages also tends to imply hiding component fragments rather than directly exposing a component fragment and allowing the programmer to import component fragments a la Newspeak and Invasive Software Composition I am not even sure how one would desire to compare Haskell s type classes implicit conversions and property acquisition inheritance or code sharing It just seems like a category error Subtext from what I ve seen uses a prototype model for reuse I would argue this model lends itself well to first class copy and paste and essentially is based on component fragments The flaw with all previous prototype models in my eyes is that they assume you should start from a base prototype This appears to conflate the design intentions of ADTs and Objects Just 2 cents about stuff I ve been thinking about lately Jonathan Edwards Posted March 4 2010 at 8 13 pm Permalink Prototypes are elegant but they may have been a mistake I am now rephrasing subtext with real types which I am finding simplifies a lot of problems However I don t want to get dragged into the theoretical quagmire of inheritance If it takes a William Cook to understand it it doesn t belong in a programming language John Z Bo Zabroski Posted March 7 2010 at 10 54 pm Permalink

    Original URL path: http://alarmingdevelopment.org/?p=358 (2016-04-30)
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  • Silverlight on Rails
    be better I guess it depends now on the target audience who are your developers and what are they making So if you want to get into the web development space then perhaps Flash is the way to go I didn t explain why I am looking for something better than SWT Swing I want to smoothly animate layout changes in my new UI to avoid disorientation Flash and WPF have good built in support for animation among many other higher level features like no redraw methods Jonathan John Nilsson Posted April 18 2007 at 5 53 pm Permalink How about going with something nice and open like XUL Or Java for that matter But if you REALLY have to pick one of those two I d say go for Flash at least there is hope for a free player soon Calvin Spealman Posted April 19 2007 at 12 11 pm Permalink I would be more hopeful of and less surprised to see them incorporate or support Python with Silverlight Microsoft has been doing more backing of Python projects lately with Ruby getting in bed with Sun Although both companies obviously show interest in a myriad of open languages Microsoft funds the IronPython project sponsers the Python Software Foundation and has been known to be porting their ASP Net APIs to Python I think all of this points to my favorite language getting a pretty important commercial boost from Big Redmond in the coming times How some of the community views this is bound to be diverse of course Boris Berkgaut Posted April 20 2007 at 6 31 am Permalink Smalltalk is not an UI platform but it is a perfect platform for exploratory style of programming It s definitely a language of choice for a person developing a radically new system alone Some implementations notably Squeak have nice graphic capabilities like antialiased object oriented graphics etc Yes but not anti aliased text Jonathan Obie Posted April 20 2007 at 4 21 pm Permalink Even if the toolset is Microsoft only at first if the platform is as cool as some people say it is and can be authored in Ruby then someone will create a non microsoft development toolset Darius Bacon Posted April 20 2007 at 5 44 pm Permalink Squeak does do antialiased TrueType fonts At least I thought that s what I made the default in my own Squeak image quite a while ago Darius Yes that seems to have improved since the last time I checked There is simple gray scale antialiasing of certain fonts I also see there is some experimental support in development for sub pixel antialiasing via Freetype A lot of the desktop graphics are not being antialiased like balloon help My big problem with Smalltalk is that its community doesn t seem to invest in defining and documenting API s You actually hear the claim that Smalltalk is self documenting and that you should just read the code to understand it Jonathan

    Original URL path: http://alarmingdevelopment.org/?p=67 (2016-04-30)
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  • Brother, can you spare a pixel?
    UI API s from the ground up WPF does everything in terms of physical metrics not pixels They are supposedly building a portable subset called WPF E that will run in all browsers which is tipped to be the main competitor to Flash In this regard they have superior technology How can Flash be the future of the web when it is barely readable on a modern screen Is the whole rest of the world still running at VGA resolution It doesn t make sense so I must be missing something Update I have verified in Apollo that it is straightforward to scale the entire UI And flash system Capabilities screenDPI purports to tell you the dpi of the screen so you could automatically scale But it always returns 72 so you can t Obviously Adobe could easily fix this if they wanted to and anyone cared My overall conclusion is that the state of usability on the web is so abysmal that most people have become numb Further update font scaling only works on embedded vector fonts As that can substantially increase the size of the download most flash files use the built in fonts which scale only between a small set of predefined point sizes This quantization of font sizes makes scaling impractical So the bottom line is that you can make Flash resolution independent manually but it is not supported by the vast installed base of flash files They will become increasingly unusable as higher res screens proliferate Share this Twitter Google Email This entry was posted in General Rants Bookmark the permalink Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed Switched to Mac and back Silverlight on Rails 5 Comments Chris Posted April 7 2007 at 10 48 am Permalink The answer to your last question is no one cares At least not until larger screen resolutions become more widespread in use I have large monitors so I set my default font size at 16 just so I can read text without having to squint Some websites handle this size well but many do not The problem you mentioned with Firefox and broken layout with larger font sizes isn t the fault of Firefox but of poor CSS design Most web developers seem to target their designs around 10 12pt font and much like this blog template fixed size layouts They rarely consider the possibility that other people are using larger screens It s not a technology issue because the technology is there It s a people issue philip Posted April 8 2007 at 5 59 pm Permalink Yahoo UI for HTML appears to solve this through the use of fonts http developer yahoo com yui fonts but not idea how to solve in Flash Am sure you could hack up your own solution based upon pixel width height epitronics Posted April 10 2007 at 5 09 am Permalink Man if the future of the web is Flash Flex ActionScript count me out I m joining the

    Original URL path: http://alarmingdevelopment.org/?p=66 (2016-04-30)
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  • Switched to Mac — and back
    Have you tried OmniOutliner DevonThink There s a ton of outliners out there and it s a daunting task to select one Omni did the trick for me Yes iPhoto is plain bad with large photo sets no way around that I really hope Apple gets their act together there Vista s file versioning intrigues me a concept that seems very useful Looks like we Macheads will get something similar with time machine but it s definitely not there yet I m just not sure I m ready to use a child of NTFS which easily wins the award as the worlds slowest FS Most importantly though you re not isolated on a Mac I usually run a Windows instance in Parallels while working on my Mac which means you can use the best tools from either world Well you ve already returned it so good luck with Vista Ultimately I really think it doesn t matter either way It boils down to taste and preferences feature wise I d call things on par I just love the idea of a Unix with a pretty UI Macneil Posted April 3 2007 at 10 29 pm Permalink I ve found it difficult to use laptops for any meaningful period of time without plugging them in to a keyboard and external monitor The neck pain is just too much I primarily use my Dell laptop which I take from home and school but use as a desktop unless I m making a presentation I have a Mac mini at home which is nice to use but Eclipse and Java development is superior on Windows And I also swear by Cygwin which strangely seems to be unpopular with the Unix geeks Even among those willing to use Windows Mark Stock Posted April 4 2007 at 12 55 am Permalink preferences We like what we are used to Mac OS has some wierd history to it which accounts for the applications documents separation I find the legacy MDI multiple document interface on Windows just as kludgy Thankfully Microsoft has been slowly dropping MDI from their applications One of my preferred keyboards was from one of the early Macs it had no function keys The keyboard centric PC still has keys that practically never get used Scroll Lock comes to mind This may be the reason lesser used keys are missing or hidden on the Mac Neurotic Nomad Posted April 4 2007 at 12 58 am Permalink Yes there are downsides to switching It seems to take 90 days for it to really stick YMMV A Nonymous Posted April 4 2007 at 1 36 am Permalink Why not use Cygwin Cygwin is ghetto It works but it s a pain in the ass compared to just using n x Really I tried Cygwin and wound up using Debian Linux as my primary desktop instead You d be better off having a second machine dedicated to n x if you can t live without windows Or

    Original URL path: http://alarmingdevelopment.org/?p=65 (2016-04-30)
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  • Plan A
    annoying to me I was even planning to read your OOPSLA paper which I ll do when I get less swamped with work So Plan A is the way I ll be following adam Posted May 2 2006 at 12 22 pm Permalink Plan A sounds indeed better Maybe do a study I m sure you must have a bunch of applications written in Subtext by now Compare those to what another language would give you Then convince the reader that in Subtext it s harder to make mistakes easier to do the right thing you write less code it s easier to test easier to maintain etc AFAICT the visual paradigm langauges so far failed among other reasons because they would not scale past a few trivial functions One gets tired of drawing boxes for each if statement pretty quickly and it makes you slower rather than faster I remember a recent OOPSLA 2003 I think demo that had exactly that problem To have a hope of convincing people you need arguments You need examples real ones and lots of them adam Macneil Posted May 7 2006 at 10 27 pm Permalink Also remember how hard it is to get a new idea out there Just look at AOP and AspectJ It took a whole institution Xerox PARC to put millions toward it along with someone like Gregor Kiczales helping it move at each step And also look at Intentional Programming which had the backing of a Microsoft millionaire and still does though it hasn t gotten far On the other side non academic programming languages like Python Perl tended to scratch an itch that the open source community had It s not my place to say where your work belongs but given the reaction from academics in private it s something to be excited about Alexander Raasch Posted June 22 2006 at 11 08 am Permalink I don t think that the problem with software development is really about how to represent the computer programs be it textual code diagrams or what ever There are so many approaches to this problem none of which has ever improved anything significantly Every time you try to make a programming language better you focus on a specific problem that you have observed or experienced with another language How do make sure that solving one issue does not incur a new one Programming a computer is actually about translating a mental model of a real world problem into abstract algorithms that can be run on a machine which works with step by step instructions The programs that we want to run on a computer are so diverse as are the real world problems they correspond to That s why we will never be able to write the ultimate software in the ultimate language on an ultimate computer Abstract thinking is hard and examples help that s true but it s basically the combination of both that makes us understand thoroughly People don

    Original URL path: http://alarmingdevelopment.org/?p=38 (2016-04-30)
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  • I scare myself
    contrary you can reach even more people Jake Brownson Posted February 8 2016 at 2 58 pm Permalink That s an interesting way to think about why open source projects are the way they are The easiest to use open source project that comes to mind is Pidgin aka Gaim from back in the day when I used to use Linux though I m not sure it passes your filter for things that just copied other things Ben Kuhn Posted February 8 2016 at 8 00 pm Permalink They re definitely sparse Maybe Popcorn Time Michael O Keefe Posted February 8 2016 at 9 37 pm Permalink These projects come to mind http clojure org http lighttable com was funded through KickStarter http witheve com Michael O Keefe Posted February 8 2016 at 9 39 pm Permalink Darn just realized you said for end users but I think the last link is still relevant Kevin Dangoor Posted February 8 2016 at 10 54 pm Permalink Your observation here matches my own experience Quality end user software is too much work for people to build on the side I have worked on Firefox and then Brackets at Adobe and it s certainly possible to get meaningful contribution from the community but it s hard to see it working without some amount of paid support Thiago Posted February 9 2016 at 1 11 pm Permalink LogicBlox in particular the Modeler application nothing in the website about it yet It has some similarities with Eve Tableau etc If you are interested in more details we can chat Thiago Posted February 9 2016 at 1 17 pm Permalink Of course I realize now that I misread open source or academic drcsr Posted February 10 2016 at 5 46 am Permalink There are quite a few open source games they are not academic but require just as many UI polishing work as anything else customer oriented Just an idea Jonathan Edwards Posted February 10 2016 at 9 40 am Permalink Good point but maybe that just goes to prove the rule that open source only works for software that the programmers want to use themselves tools or games It takes professionals to build software for other people with other needs Chad Wellington Posted February 10 2016 at 3 29 pm Permalink Berners Lee s WorldWideWeb Google search Harmonix controller music games e g Guitar Hero they re commercial but the basics were there in the MIT media lab demos Xerox Alto Star Kay s Dynabook let s call it a demi example the concept was clearly realized decades before it became commercially practical to create I m cheating here of course Most of these aren t academic projects in one way or another PhD projects research lab projects prototypes later refined commerically etc Which is perhaps enlightening to the matter at hand the strictures of academia and freedom of OSS development both prevent the kind of development you re looking for Too much non novel engineering design for academia too much focused discipline for weekend warrior work Instead you have to find that entrepreneurial middle ground more likely to be found in the plucky grad student or industrial research lab Sean McDirmid Posted February 10 2016 at 9 01 pm Permalink There is a lot to do before you get to product What are the models that could work What are the principles behind their design What changes in our thinking are needed to really succeed here Looking at Eve they went through a lot of experimentation with prototypes failed many times failing is good and seem to be homing in on something that works That doesn t really require professionals so much as passionate researchers and hackers who are willing to fail a lot The engineers and designers who are used to creating polished products won t be very useful until the other investigative work is done well we could say they might be useful but I ve found that many aren t cut out of the failing and seat of the pants prototyping that invention involves People ask me why I haven t gone and productized or open sourced my research yet To be perfectly honest I ve made progress but I still don t think I m anywhere near having the great ideas needed for a revolutionary product yet In the same light I think there are still a lot of ideas and story development that need to be pursued before Transcript as a product is apparent I definitely would love to help out with that Academia has its own dysfunction it is often pursuing an end goal of perverse incentives that is irrelevant to real progress CDG breaks that mold and seem to be a nice place to incubate radically different and potentially game changing ideas One person or a few people can definitely do that work Jonathan Edwards Posted February 10 2016 at 10 14 pm Permalink You re totally right Sean Got a lot more research to do first But when I heard Dan Hicks had died this post leapt into my mind Sean McDirmid Posted February 10 2016 at 10 23 pm Permalink At some point disrupting the world won t seem important anymore We aren t there yet however Jonathan Edwards Posted February 11 2016 at 8 50 pm Permalink Oh and thanks for offering to help I m designing the live programming environment at the moment and could really benefit from your insights My hypothesis is that by having simplified the data and programming semantics I can make a live programming experience that unlike many of the experiments done so far is complete everything that can be done in the language can be experienced first hand in the environment I e not just live 2D graphics Beth Posted February 15 2016 at 12 45 pm Permalink Scratch seems to be a good example it s an academic project It is part of the MIT Media Lab

    Original URL path: http://alarmingdevelopment.org/?p=1049?shared=email&msg=fail (2016-04-30)
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  • Dispatches from the Programmer Liberation Front | Page 3
    This choice is orthogonal meaning that I can easily change it if it turns out to be wrong The reason to discuss such a trivial issue is that it is an example of how choices that made Posted in General Comments closed Still Alive By Jonathan Edwards Published January 12 2011 Hey long time Having a snow day here which is a good day to catch up My son got sick this summer which knocked me out of commission for a while but I am back to work now As promised last June I have defined the formal semantics of a core language that captures the Posted in General Comments closed Pay no attention to that strange old man on Channel 9 By Jonathan Edwards Published August 7 2010 Here I actually haven t watched it yet because it is just too freaky to see myself on video I ll wait till Edward Norton plays me in the movie version Posted in General Comments closed Emerging Languages Camp Wrapup By Jonathan Edwards Published August 2 2010 I meant to write this earlier but I have been occupied with a family medical emergency The EL camp was a great experience and I hope they do it again I met more interesting people and heard more interesting ideas than at any other conference I have attended Naturally there were ups and downs There Posted in General Comments closed Emerging Languages Camp By Jonathan Edwards Published July 20 2010 Slides are at PPT PDF I will probably only have time to present a subset of these slides Posted in General Comments closed Vulcans vs Apes By Jonathan Edwards Published June 2 2010 The biggest problem with programming is that we don t agree on what the problem is The comments on the previous posts reveal fundamentally incompatible views I am equally shocked by the opinions held by some distinguished academics and leading practitioners Our views of programming are so at odds that it s almost as if we were Posted in General Comments closed Mea Culpa By Jonathan Edwards Published May 27 2010 Reflecting upon my previous post I am wondering why LISP triumphalists like Paul Graham annoy me so much Perhaps it is because I used to be one myself in spirit if not in syntax And also because I now see them as a major symptom of what ails programming Posted in General Comments closed The Myth of the Super Programming Language By Jonathan Edwards Published May 11 2010 I just read yet another recycling of the old myth of how some esoteric programming language often Lisp or Haskell is the secret weapon that allowed a team to outperform expectations by an order of magnitude Paul Graham has strongly encouraged this myth see Beating the Averages but it has been circulating for ages It Posted in AgitProp General Comments closed The Greater Apple Co Prosperity Sphere By Jonathan Edwards Published May 10 2010 Much has been written lately about Apple restricting

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