archive-org.com » ORG » A » ALBERTADOCTORS.ORG

Total: 974

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Dr. William Cochrane, 1926- | Alberta Medical Association
    and research in carbohydrate metabolism in the US and at Great Ormond Street Children s Hospital in Britain 1954 55 VIDEO Dr William Cochrane Canadian Medical Hall of Fame Laureate 2010 The Cochrane test for diagnosing L leucine intolerance was a discovery he made before becoming a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians FRCP in 1956 This test which is still in use today identifies a type of hypoglycemia that is sensitive to protein intake Later during his time at Dalhousie 1958 67 he began the first cystic fibrosis clinic in the Maritimes established the Atlantic Research Centre for Mental Retardation and arranged funding for the Isaac Walton Killam Hospital for Children which opened in 1970 Establishing the U of C Faculty of Medicine His interest in Dr Miller s systems approach to teaching medicine led him to become the first dean of medicine at the new University of Calgary U of C in 1967 Dr Miller s innovation was to teach medicine one body system at a time a change from the traditional anatomy physiology pathology physical exam and graduated clinical approach to teaching medicine The Calgary program which started in 1970 was also unique in having no summers off and three years of continuous teaching In 1972 he established a satellite health clinic at the Stony Indian Reserve in Morley and was made honorary medicine chief at the reserve The first class of MDs graduated in 1973 in the top half of the Licentiates of the Medical Council of Canada LMCCs Dr Cochrane worked briefly as Alberta s Deputy Minister of Health before becoming president of the U of C 1974 78 CEO of Connaught Laboratories From 1978 89 he was president and CEO of Connaught Laboratories which was evolving from an academic to a corporate medical

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/william-cochrane (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Dr. Charles Allard, 1919-91 | Alberta Medical Association
    U of A over Queens Later he headed east into one of the first McGill surgical residencies By 1948 he was back at the Edmonton General Hospital EGH with an FRCSC and FACS As there was no medical office space he and his family built the nine story Northgate building in 1950 As a general surgeon he did it all from gastric bypasses to closed heart commissurotomies to endocrine organ operations He loved to draw bedside diagrams for his patients and then give them the diagrams In the OR he quoted poetry and sang At 36 he became the EGH head of surgery Hearing of the Fort Saskatchewan rail school bus accident that killed 17 and wounded 27 he went to the site to triage patients He also assisted with the first Siamese twins operation at the Royal Alexandra Hospital led by Dr Eardly Allin By 1968 he had built Northwest Trust into 13 branches with 800M in assets His Crosstown Motors partnership became the largest Chrysler dealership in Canada His investments included life insurance companies methanol and other chemical plants terminals and tanker fleets In 1971 he started the Edmonton Oilers and secured Wayne Gretzky as a player His first company Allarco Developments was sold for 127M less the TV and farming interests it contained His TV company Allarcom hired prominent actors like John Candy A production studio and a Super Channel with pay TV followed The TV assets were sold to Canada West Global for 160M plus 23 of Western International Communications Far sighted he was one of the founders and charterers of the Bank of Alberta which became the Canadian Bank of Western Canada At his funeral the minister predicted he was already negotiating with God over his future The Allard Foundation has made significant contributions to

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/charles-allard (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dr. Walter Campbell Mackenzie, 1909-78 | Alberta Medical Association
    the globe University of Alberta Hospital Chair Peter Owen VIDEO Watch this video about Dr Mackenzie from the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame Early life After completing his medical and residency training at Dalhousie University the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal and at the Mayo Clinic before coming to Edmonton A maritimer he enlisted in the navy at the beginning of the Second World War and served on naval convoys in the Bay of Biscay and on the dangerous Murmansk Run along the coast of Norway Later assigned to Stone Frigates naval installations on land he was the chief surgeon at Esquimalt St John s Halifax and Sydney becoming a Surgeon Commander before the war was over Arrival in Edmonton As Dr Mackid foresaw in 1912 the west would attract the kind of physician who thinks boldly acts boldly by necessity first and then by conviction and ultimately by habit Dr Mackenzie was one Dr W C Mackenzie twice chose to practice surgery in Edmonton in 1938 and after the war in 1945 The young surgeon first came to Edmonton because it was then a frontier city something that intrigued him and because it had a medical school In 1938 he joined the J O Baker Clinic as a general surgeon When he came back after the war he practiced as an independent surgeon and joined the University of Alberta s Faculty of Medicine as an instructor He later completed the difficult Fellowship of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada examination and was appointed Professor and Head of Surgery at the U of A 1951 59 In the early 1950s Dr Mackenzie oversaw the opening of the surgical medical research institute SMRI and the cancer focused McEachern Laboratory the first medical research facilities at the University of Alberta Annual research grants would increase from 100 000 to 2 5 million by 1974 During his deanship the second longest at the University of Alberta 1959 74 he doubled the undergraduate MD entry to 108 and increased the number of residents from 44 to 225 Educationally he encouraged self learning from day one systems teaching earlier clinical exposure and a meaningful clerkship In 1963 the faculty s 50th year Dr Mackenzie proposed a health science center for all health related faculties He believed that when health services personnel were trained together they will learn each other s capabilities and will cooperate and work together Propelled by the federal Health Resources Fund Dr Mackenzie secured funding for the Clinical Sciences Building 1968 and the Basic Medical Sciences building 1972 Other achievements He joined 25 international medical organizations becoming president of 12 of them He was the first Canadian president of the Royal College of Canada the American College of Surgeons and the International College of Surgeons He received four Honorary Fellowships two honorary memberships three honorary degrees and the Canadian Medical Association s Frederic Newton Gisborne Starr Award as the outstanding physician in Canada In retirement he studied road trauma

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/mackenzie (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dr. Mary Evangeline Percy Jackson, 1904-2000 | Alberta Medical Association
    she wrote I ve got the whole valley to myself There s not a light to be seen There s something overpowering about the size of Canada Her cottage was 3 km from the nearest neighbour 3 km from the end of the telegraph and two weeks between mail deliveries When she came to Alberta Dr Percy only planned to stay until an obstetrical position became available in India But by the fall of 1929 she had fallen in love with the Peace River country later writing People here succeed or fail entirely on their own abilities and though their life is hard there is something clean and honest about it I know I m doing the right job The women out here are so awfully glad to have a doctor By year s end she realized I ve gained a reputation that I might never have in a life time in England and above all the work is worth it A busy week In the spring of 1930 Dr Percy described one of her busiest weeks Arriving home at midnight after a house call Dr Percy was met by a husband asking her to see his pregnant wife After 32 km of riding through swollen rivers and galloping the last 3 km they found the wife without a pulse Dr Percy stabilized the mother who was hemorrhaging delivered the baby and stayed 14 hours to ensure that the mother s bleeding stopped Right after Dr Percy arrived home another man knocked on her window at 1 a m asking her to see his wife Finding that the wife had appendicitis Dr Percy transferred her to Peace River Another man soon arrived at her home also asking her to see his wife After riding 14 km to see this patient Dr Percy stayed with her most of the next 24 hours She then rode about 65 km to revisit her first patients the mother and baby before accompanying the patient with acute appendicitis by sleigh and Caterpillar to Peace River where she had to stay and give the anesthetic In eight days she had ridden about 286 km survived a snowstorm and nearly drowned during one river crossing Marriage and motherhood in the North Being the only doctor in the Peace River district meant that Dr Percy Jackson had to guide her husband through the difficult delivery of their seven week premature baby in 58 C weather In the fall of 1930 Dr Mary Percy met Frank Jackson who had lost his wife following a post partum hemorrhage one month after their third son was born Life became even more difficult for him when he developed a badly infected hand As Dr Percy was the nearest doctor he travelled about 110 km south in 40 C weather to see her By then he was suffering from blood poisoning Dr Percy lanced his hand and he began to recover Engaged in 1931 they traveled to Peace River to buy the only

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/percy (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dr. Harold A. Hamman, 1901-1987 | Alberta Medical Association
    to serve 900 Treaty Indians and Fort Vermilion residents on the lower Peace River His practice extended 350 km upstream to Peace River and 320 km downstream to Hay River Although Fort Vermilion had a 10 bed hospital there was no pharmacy Dr Hamman had to buy his own medicine and recover what he could from his patients In December 1928 he received a letter from Little Red River asking him to see a patient Because the symptoms suggested diphtheria an often fatal upper respiratory tract illness in the unvaccinated Dr Hamman took his last 5 000 units of diphtheria toxin with him After traveling 80 km by dog team he found the patient gravely ill with diphtheria I gave him what antitoxin I had but it was old stuff Dr Hamman wrote later A dramatic mercy flight To prevent an epidemic Dr Hamman sent an urgent message to Alberta s Deputy Minister of Health Dr Malcolm Bow asking for more vaccine It took 11 days by dogsled for the request to reach Peace River where it could be telegraphed to Edmonton Read the story of Dr Malcolm Ross Bow Dr Bow sent 500 000 units of diphtheria vaccine with pilots Wop May and Vic Horner to Fort Vermilion May and Horner left Edmonton on Jan 2 1929 travelling the 450 km in an open cockpit two seater plane in temperatures as low as 42 C They landed in Fort Vermilion two days later one hour before Dr Hamman arrived to greet them On the pilots return to Edmonton 10 000 people greeted them at the airport and twice that number lined the parade route Meanwhile Dr Hamman headed back to Little Red River to vaccinate everyone he could find helping to limit the disease to the one fatal case

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/hamman (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dr. John W. Scott, 1894-1982 | Alberta Medical Association
    every prescription he wrote Research should not be looked upon as a luxury but as a very necessary part of the activities of a medical school It stimulates the minds of those who do it and makes them more dynamic and critical teachers Early days in medicine and academia Dr Scott began his medical career in September 1915 as a member of the third class of premedical students at the U of A Although Dr Scott s medical studies were interrupted by his WWI service 1918 19 he returned to Canada and graduated from McGill in 1921 While attending a conference on the new drug insulin 1923 Dr Scott impressed the presenter Prof J B Collip who then asked him to join the U of A Faculty of Medicine Two years later Dr Scott attended the thrilling convocation of the first eleven MDs that graduated from the U of A including Dr Leone McGregor the first female graduate from the U of A Faculty of Medicine His one publication with Prof Collip was on The effect of parathyroid hormone in normal animals In 1928 Dr Scott succeeded Dr Colllip as the head of Biochemistry before he left to study internal medicine in Britain He returned to the faculty with a Canadian fellowship and special training in GI and endocrine diseases in 1932 Dr Scott invited Dr Collip back to U of A in 1956 to unveil a plaque commemorating Copp s discovery of parathyroid hormone in 1925 Medical education Dr Scott loved presenting actual patients to his undergraduate classes One was a class member s future wife who had just developed diabetes Another was Charles Allard who suffered a spontaneous pneumothorax while cross country skiing on the North Saskatchewan River During WWII Dr Scott taught an onerous 20 hours a week as the faculty compressed each academic year into 6 months The faculty managed to graduate two extra classes by 1945 After the war Dr Scott was a member of the 1946 Nucleus Committee that initiated and oversaw the first residency training programs 70 of the postgraduate trained physicians returned to Alberta and 50 joined the faculty After becoming the Dean of Medicine 1948 1959 Scott immediately began looking for his successor and secured the return of Dr D R Wilson Scott continued as the Professor and Head of Medicine until 1954 when he relinquished the position to Dr Wilson Under his deanship the U of A received three Markle scholarships for Drs D R Wilson R Fraser and L McLeod to start programs in endocrinology cardiology and nephrology Honored by his Alma Mater The class of 1961 suggested the hospital library be named after Dr Scott The name continued when the medical library was moved to the Walter C Mackenzie Health Sciences Center in 1984 The inscription at the entranceway reads He was to all of us like Luke the beloved physician Today the U of A s Scott Honor Award recognizes the graduate who is expected to achieve

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/john-w-scott (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dr. Earle Parkhill Scarlett, 1896-1982 | Alberta Medical Association
    the Machine Gun Corps during World War I and survived both a mustard gas attack and a serious shrapnel injury to his neck During his rehabilitation he met his guiding light Sir William Osler Dr Osler created the first medical residency program and was the first to include bedside clinical training as part of medical students education After the war he came back to Canada Not sure what career to pursue he canvassed a dozen friends of his father Only two both physicians were happy with their professions He decided to study medicine at the University of Toronto supporting himself with a summer job as a conductor on the CPR s Soo line from Portal Saskatchewan to Banff Alberta After several years of post graduate training in United States in Internal Medicine specializing in heart disease he wanted to come back to Canada His mother suggested writing to R B Bennett a Calgary MP and soon to be Prime Minister Bennett connected him with his friend and fellow MP Dr G D Stanley at Calgary s Associate Clinic In 1930 Dr Scarlett arrived in Calgary as the clinic s first trained cardiologist along with its first ECG machine Becoming a medical historian Dr Scarlett s long standing interest in medical history soon led to monthly evening sessions devoted to topics in medical history Early in 1936 Dr Stanley suggested that he and Dr Scarlett start a medical history magazine which their clinic would support They co edited the Calgary Associate Clinic Historical Bulletin CACHB from 1936 to 1958 Dr Scarlett s column was the Commonplace book of a medical reader Dr Stanley usually focused on his own experiences during his pioneering days in High River and after 1918 in Calgary All the members of the clinic wrote articles for the bulletin on a rotating basis The 88 issues offer an irreplaceable window on early Alberta medicine those who delivered it and how it was practiced Dr Scarlett went on to manage the Associate Clinic before being nominated as the University of Alberta Chancellor 1952 58 Resigning from practice in 1959 Dr Scarlett took up to his second career as a medical historian full time writing in three journals simultaneously and eight more sporadically His bibliography eventually included 451 works Dr Scarlett encouraged his colleagues and friends to develop a library to serve as a starting point in a voyage of conception and delicious diligent indolence Later years The only physician on the board Dr Scarlett was a significant figure in establishing the faculty of medicine at the University of Calgary in 1966 the year the Foothills Hospital opened He dedicated the hospital to a fellowship as old as mankind the history of service to the sick and the teaching of medicine respectfully noting that within these walls life begins and ends here are reverence for life a sense of the dignity of man the distilled medical and scientific wisdom of years and a shelter from the winds of illness Dr

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/scarlett (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dr. James Bertram Collip, 1892-1965 | Alberta Medical Association
    many of his students During his 13 years at the U of A he published 77 papers including one on the discovery of the parathyroid hormone in 1924 He received a DSc from the U of A in 1925 and earned his MD the next year He became a member of the Royal Society of Canada in 1925 and the Royal Society of England in 1933 When two of the five faculty of medicine staff went overseas he took over a colleague s pharmacology teaching load in addition to his own to sustain the faculty during the First World War VIDEO Canadian Medical Hall of Fame video about the work of Dr James Collip In 1921 he received a Rockefeller Travelling Fellowship that started at the McLeod Laboratory at the U of T which specialized in measuring blood glucose levels Two weeks after he started he concentrated a pancreatic extract induced hypoglycemia in a rabbit and then reversed it with glucose The next month in January 1922 his extract named insulin was successfully administered to the first patient He later received one sixth of the royalties for his own research When the Banting team received the Nobel Prize in January 1923 Professor McLeod shared his half of the 24 000 award with Dr Collip In a 1923 course with Dr Jamieson on insulin Dr Collip convinced a student in the audience Dr John Scott to join him and eventually replace him on the U of A faculty Dr Collip became the dean of medicine at the U of A in 1948 His many other achievements included 249 publications 12 honorary LLDs Membership on the insulin team that received the first Frederic Newton Gisborne Starr Award from the Canadian Medical Association in 1935 The Banting Medal in 1960 Dr Collip followed

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/james-bertram-collip (2016-02-01)
    Open archived version from archive