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  • Dr. Malcolm Ross Bow, 1887-1982 | Alberta Medical Association
    s health care system During Dr Bow s time as Deputy Minister of Health from 1927 to 1952 Alberta s health care system became recognized as one of the most progressive in Canada His focus was on preventing illnesses especially infectious illnesses A master at analyzing health information Dr Bow thought that one half of the preventable illnesses in Canada could be eradicated by vaccination He believed that this process could save 23 million days in lost work time or 150 million per year in Canada Even during the Depression he never lost government support for his public health strategy i e to maintain a healthy workforce from the United Farmers of Alberta government or the post 1935 Social Credit government Among his many achievements Dr Bow appointed salaried provincial doctors to work in the remote areas of Northern Alberta The first set were all female physicians including Drs Owen Strang Johnson and Percy later Jackson During the polio outbreak of 1927 Dr Bow had a hospital built as part of the University of Alberta Hospital to treat the survivors During the second epidemic in 1938 he drafted the Polio Sufferers Act which provided free rehabilitation services to all polio patients a Canadian first He expanded the District Health Nursing programs which began with four nurses in 1919 By 1939 there were 25 nurses He also broadened the program s services by starting the Rural Maternity and Well Baby programs Promoting public health insurance From 1932 to 1934 he worked with the Hoadley Commission to draft proposals for a health insurance program that would provide adequate medical and health services for the people of Alberta He believed that government had a responsibility to pay for health care for those who could not afford it The Commission s recommendations were enshrined

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/bow (2016-02-01)
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  • Dr. J.J. (Johnny) Ower, 1885-1962 | Alberta Medical Association
    boyish spirit Dr Earle P Scarlett Dr Ower during World War I In 1914 Dr Ower was on his way to Germany to study in the Aschoff Laboratory when England declared war He had joined the 5th Field Ambulance in Montreal and was called up to join the McGill staffed 1 Canadian General Hospital In December 1914 Dr Ower was assigned to the hospitals laboratory under Dr Allan C Rankin to treat the meningococcal meningitis outbreak among the Canadian soldiers Transferred to France in April 1915 he responded to the first chlorine gas attack which caused 1 200 casualties who were brought to the hospital with pneumonia and pulmonary edema A diarist he recorded that during the war only one third of the casualties brought to the hospital were wounded from shrapnel and shell injuries while two thirds were admitted with illnesses By 1918 his hospital was specializing in hip fractures using Thomas splints and traction That summer whole battalions of 1 000 men or more would arrive with the newly discovered Spanish flu Returning to Alberta Dr Ower arrived in Edmonton in 1919 as the first Professor and Chairman of the University of Alberta s Department of Pathology as well as seropathologist at the provincial laboratory He was also the surgical pathologist at the Misercordia and the Edmonton General hospitals for decades After pathologists were required to examine all surgical specimens taken in rural Alberta in 1924 the volume of work at the U of A Hospital increased to over 9 500 specimens per year by 1941 the largest in Canada During World War 1 Dr Ower developed an acute pancreatitis Sir William Osler informed him that this might lead to insulin dependent diabetes which it did in 1926 Dr Ower s insulin requirements increased from 10 units per day in 1932 to 30 in 1947 to 55 in 1955 mostly of Toronto CZI insulin From 1939 to 1943 Dr Ower was the acting Dean of Medicine at the U of A replacing Dr Rankin He organized the acceleration and compression of medical classes in 1942 that resulted in two extra classes graduating before the end of World War II Alberta s medical contribution to the war effort as part of the 800 extra physicians requested by Minister Ralston in 1942 was exceptional By 1945 medical enlistments from Alberta reached 70 of the the number of registered physicians in Alberta in 1939 The Canadian average was 30 With Dr Rankin s assistance a new provincial lab was designed built and opened in 1950 After Dr Rankin s retirement Dr Ower became the Dean of the U of A s Faculty of Medicine 1945 48 Achievements during his time as dean include The start of postgraduate medical education 1946 The rejuvenation of medical research by the Medical Research Council s western research group 1946 The transfer of the 1923 500 000 Rockefeller grant to the Faculty by the University Later achievements Suffering from failing health as a result of complications

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/dr-jj-ower (2016-02-01)
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  • Dr. Heber Carss Jamieson, 1879-1962 | Alberta Medical Association
    was the Ontario lightweight boxing champion before graduating in medicine from the University of Toronto and earning an MRCS Member of the Royal College of Surgeons in 1911 He was also an accomplished golfer swimmer figure skater skier dancer marathon runner badminton and tennis player remaining active well into retirement Together with his brother Claude he toured Canada and settled in Edmonton in 1912 At the University of Alberta Dr Jamieson joined the U of A faculty as a provincial laboratory bacteriologist He helped draft the first medical curriculum in 1914 During World War I he replaced Dr Allan C Rankin as the acting head of the provincial laboratory He also gave Dr Rankin s lectures and taught the course in clinical medicine In 1918 he proposed a District Nurse program for Alberta which began the next year and later joined the provincial traveling clinic that went north every summer After Dr J B Collip returned to the U of A from a sabbatical in 1921 1922 Drs Collip and Jamieson presented a program using the newly available insulin that Dr Collip had isolated Future dean Dr J W Scott attended the program beginning his 48 year association with the U of A faculty of medicine Dr Jamieson also started an early diabetic outpatient program His second patient didn t see another physician for 20 years and the third lived until age 65 By 1922 Dr Jamieson had become an Assistant Professor of Medicine At the time a U of A teacher s medical income was only a supplement Although Dr Jamieson maintained a private practice that specialized in allergy kidney and endocrine problems he rarely sent out bills to his patients Not infrequently Dr Jamieson received Christmas presents from wealthier patients and chickens from grateful rural patients Literary life In 1927 Jamieson and Dr Richard K Gordon of the U of A English department wrote two novels about the life of a boy in the Northwest Territories They used a pseudonym Norman Blake to protect their reputations and published the books in England Medical historian Dr Jamieson became a full time teacher of medical history and ethics in 1928 By 1933 he had written histories of Dr William M Mackay the Edmonton General Hospital and medicine in Edmonton In recognition the Jamieson Reporting Club was formed to focus staff and students on medical history Jamieson s seminal book Early Medicine in Alberta The First Seventy five Years was published in 1947 the year he retired Always looking for adventure he took up flying during his retirement His instructor had trouble getting him to land so he forced Dr Jamieson to make his first landing by uncoupled his control column and throwing it overboard He was horrified when Dr Jamieson did the same thing Dr Jamieson had learned about the plan beforehand so he stored another control column under his seat The landing was perfect but his instructor didn t speak to him again for three months Although he passed

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/jamieson (2016-02-01)
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  • Dr. Albert Ernest Archer, 1878-1949 | Alberta Medical Association
    in Lamont Dr Albert Ernest Archer was the driving force behind the first hospital in Lamont A gold medalist from the University of Toronto Dr Archer arrived in Star about 72 km northwest of Edmonton as a United Church missionary physician to the Ukrainian community in 1903 When the railway went through Lamont 8 km away in 1906 the Archers moved their home there moving the house on skids As the town lacked a hospital for the next six years Dr Archer saw patients in his home During the typhoid outbreak of 1907 he and his wife set up a tent in their backyard to treat patients with Mrs Archer serving as the 24 hour nurse This episode spurred Dr Archer to press for a hospital in Lamont He had been on the committee that fundraised and built the Lamont Union Methodist and Presbyterian church in 1906 So he turned to his father a Methodist minister and persuaded the church board to sponsor a hospital The community raised 13 000 in 15 months The Lamont Public Hospital managed by the United Church opened on Sept 12 1912 with 15 beds and five bassinets Dr Archer became the first Medical Superintendent a position he occupied for the next 37 years His regular fundraising campaigns ensured that the hospital was never in debt and could serve all the patients sent to it especially for surgery By 1948 the year Dr Archer died the hospital had 90 beds and was the largest general hospital in Alberta outside Calgary or Edmonton Its reputation for excellent and compassionate care was so well known that patients were referred to it from Edmonton and from as far away as western Saskatchewan Get the whole story Read the full profile of Dr Archer in Dr Robert Lampard s

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/archer (2016-02-01)
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  • Dr. Allan Coats Rankin, 1877-1959 | Alberta Medical Association
    the exodus of McGill medical graduates to Alberta Dr Rankin earned his Membership in the Royal College of Surgeons MRCS in 1907 and a Diploma in Public Health in 1909 Researching beriberi in Thailand Between 1910 and 1914 he was in Thailand as the director of the national laboratory where he was decorated by King Vajiravudh with the country s highest honor for his research into the relationship between beriberi a disease caused primarily by the lack of Vitamin B 1 thiamine and polished rice Services during the First World War Arriving in Edmonton in 1914 he replaced Dr Revell as the second Director of the Provincial Lab Just months later after the outbreak of the First World War he joined the 1CDN General Hospital staff During the war he Helped treat a meningococcal outbreak amongst the Canadian troops Went door to door case searching and vaccinating Belgians for typhoid fever averting another epidemic Diagnosed and prevented the spread of the malaria that arrived with the Indian troops Correctly diagnosed the first chlorine gas attack by the Germans Researched the best gas masks to prepare for the future gas attacks Described the widespread and debilitating trench fever in the Lancet Dr Rankin s future brother in law Dr H Orr would develop the Orr Hut to treat trench fever Dr Rankin was awarded a CMG by King George V before returning to the University of Alberta U of A to become its first Dean of Medicine in 1920 First dean of medicine at the U of A He oversaw the design and building of the U of A medical school 1920 21 recommended James Bertram Collip for the sabbatical that led to his groundbreaking isolation of insulin selected the first class of 11 MDs that graduated in 1925 and the first class of dentists that graduated in 1927 Dr Rankin managed the Provincial Laboratory for 31 years He was appointed to the U of A Hospital Board UAH when it reverted to the university in 1922 and selected its first medical staff In 1926 Dr Rankin chaired the credential assessment committee for selecting and approving medical specialists in Alberta This was the first specialist recognition system in Canada established three years before the Royal College was formed He conducted TB research in cattle and proved that cattle could not transmit TB to humans Dr Rankin and the faculty worked diligently to improve the U of A s graduating class marks in the Dominion Medical Council of Canada LMCC exams The class of 1935 achieved the highest average in the country setting aside the faculty s reputation as a second class school During the Second World War he was appointed the Lt Col in charge of Hygiene and Sanitary Services for the Armed Services 1939 43 He finally gained his release from the army because he was over 60 and returned to the U of A to manage the acceleration of medical classes and the design of the Mewburn Pavilion which

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/rankin (2016-02-01)
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  • Dr. Richard Barrington Nevitt, 1874-1878 | Alberta Medical Association
    provinces new NWMP recruits rode about 1 600 km from Dufferin near the US border in Manitoba to Fort Macleod Alberta Few know that the March included two American born but Canadian trained surgeons Drs John Kittson and R Barrington Nevitt They were the first full time physicians on the Prairies west of Winnipeg The value of having two physicians became clear the first week after the March began when it was almost halted by a severe outbreak of diarrhea and dysentery The cause was typhoid fever which would become the most common cause of NWMP deaths over the force s first 25 years Nevitt returned twice to Dufferin to accompany or attend sick recruits One died On July 26 Nevitt and Kittson sent four more men back to Manitoba On August 2 22 developed dysentery Two were sent to North Dakota with pneumonia On August 19 seven more were left at Crippled Camp under Dr Nevitt s temporary care to be picked up by the returning force in October During the March Dr Nevitt made two side trips to attend sick First Nations people while Kittson treated the usual aches and pains that presented each day at sick parade At the Sweet Grass Hills Kittson began his return with Colonel French to Swan River Manitoba as ordered by Ottawa In his report he noted there have been loss of oxen and horses a few desertions and two deaths All men had put on weight except one and that member was the better for it When the NWMP men arrived at their destination on October 13 their first action was to build Fort Macleod The hospital was one room with enough space for 10 or 12 cots Over the next four years Dr Nevitt and his colleague did their best

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/nevitt (2016-02-01)
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  • Dr. John Sinclair McEachern, 1873-1947 | Alberta Medical Association
    for Health Insurance in Canada 1932 34 Persuade the members of provincial medical associations to federate with the CMA to create a voice for all Canadian physicians 1938 It is too soon to estimate the full value of McEachern s contributions to Canadian medicine and to Canada but he is now known and will be known in future days as one of Canada s outstanding medical statesmen Dr T C Routley in a 1948 eulogy VIDEO Canadian Medical Hall of Fame video about the work of Dr John Sinclair McEachern Turning around the Canadian Medical Association CMA He arrived in Calgary NWT in 1904 starting the McEachern clinic that lasted until 1978 In 1908 he became the first President of the Alberta Medical Association from Calgary His first CMA contribution came in 1921 when as a committee of one he addressed the motion to disband the CMA and successfully presented the plan for its turnaround He became President of the CMA in 1934 He also chaired the CMA committee that formed the Canadian Cancer Society in 1938 and became its first board chair Getting ready for health insurance His interest in health insurance began in 1929 He served on the CMA s first study committee and then the Committee on Economics that recommended 17 principles for a national plan in 1934 The CMA accepted those principles in 1935 and used them as the basis for negotiating a national health insurance plan with the Federal Government in 1942 He was the CMA link with the AMA when Dr Archer the founder of the first hospital in Lamont and an influential and early supporter of a national health program presented a provincial plan for health insurance in Alberta in 1932 McEachern foresaw the need to unite the provincial and national medical organizations

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/mceachern (2016-02-01)
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  • Dr. George Henry Malcolmson, 1868-1944 | Alberta Medical Association
    s home Canada s most deadly landslide lasted about seven seconds An estimated 70 people died in the slide About 10 people were injured four of them seriously All of the injured were sent to Dr Malcolmson s hospital The worst cases were caused by the windblast The wind drove a board into one patient s abdomen Feathers from the patient s bedspread then became embedded in the wound Dr Malcolmson had to remove each feather one at a time Injuries to other patients included a broken hip shock from internal injuries and stone splinters embedded like a pin cushion in a patient s skin All of the injured patients survived under the care of Dr Malcolmson and his nurses Alberta s first radiologist Dr Malcolmson was Alberta s first radiologist and one of the first in Canada He also brought the first X ray unit to Alberta in 1906 and the first radium for cancer treatment to Western Canada in 1919 X rays were still a new phenomenon in the early 20th century During a trip to Boston in 1906 Dr Malcolmson was so excited by X rays medical potential that he bought an X ray machine and brought it to his small hospital in Frank Alberta We don t know how many patients received X rays in Frank but we do know that Dr Malcolmson travelled regularly to eastern Canada and the US as well as Europe as part of his continuing medical education program X rays played a key role in his own life In 1914 they helped to diagnose tuberculosis in one of his kidneys Doctors at Johns Hopkins University had missed this diagnosis only the week before Dr Will Mayo removed the kidney at the Mayo Clinic Dr Malcolmson remained tuberculosis free the rest of

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/about/medical-history/patients-1st-for-over-100-years/malcolmson (2016-02-01)
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