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  • A walk to remember | Alberta Medical Association
    Kapoor What is the DIL Walk We know that the South Asian community has a three to five times higher risk for heart attack explains Dr Anmol Kapoor a Calgary cardiologist We also know that screening and education have an important impact It was that thinking that inspired Dr Kapoor and his wife Raman a registered dietician to launch DIL Do It for Life Walk in 2012 Now entering its third year the one day event begins by checking participants blood sugar blood pressure and measuring waist circumference before directing them on to various 15 minute heart health related education sessions All participants receive a passport that notes their various readings and the sessions they ve attended After the sessions the entire group heads out for the walk before wrapping the day up with a lunch donated by one of the event s community sponsors Real results Last year we had close to 1 000 people attend notes Dr Kapoor And we diagnosed several new cases of diabetes hypertension and angina He has also heard that many people brought their passports into their family physicians for follow up It prompted them to do something about their heart health which is exactly what we aimed to do This year two events will be held the first in Calgary on June 7 and the second in Edmonton on June 14 As always community support and donations are critically important Since last year we ve become a registered charity so now we can issue tax receipts explains Dr Kapoor Organizers are also planning a fundraising gala for this fall to help generate much needed funds to support future DIL Walk events The success of the DIL Walk has drawn interest from across the country and Dr Kapoor hopes to someday see similar events

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/advocating/many-hands/walk-to-remember (2016-02-01)
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  • Teaming up for kids | Alberta Medical Association
    difference Everyone recognizes the benefits of getting kids involved in sports but those activities can be out of reach for some children That was the reality that prompted a group of medical students at the University of Alberta to team up with the City of Edmonton and Big Brothers Big Sisters BBBS to create a soccer program specifically for kids who may not otherwise get a chance to be involved in sports As undergrads we had been working with BBBS to mentor high school kids and heard about a program in Vancouver called Hockey Heroes that focused on inner city kids recalls Dr Debraj Das a first year resident Inspired by the idea Dr Das and his friend and colleague Dr Robbie Sidhu approached BBBS to establish a similar program in Edmonton Soccer made sense because we could do it during the summer months when we weren t in school Launched in the summer of 2008 the Soccer Superstars program brought together students in grades three to six from Montrose School and Ben Calf Robe School and teamed them up on the soccer field We met on Tuesdays and Thursdays for eight weeks says Dr Das Our goal was to teach them about teamwork and give them a chance to have fun The program ran for four years and spawned another program called Basketball Buddies before wrapping up in 2012 due to the increasingly busy schedules of Dr Das and Dr Sidhu who had begun medical school We just didn t have the time to devote to it anymore says Dr Das It definitely had an impact on the kids and it was an incredible experience for us It actually influenced my decision to go into medicine because it showed me how you can make a difference In fact he

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/advocating/many-hands/teaming-up-for-kids (2016-02-01)
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  • Changing perspectives | Alberta Medical Association
    of Calgary she helped start the Calgary Drop In Centre Student Run Clinic As she moved into her residency training she envisioned a future that would incorporate volunteer work into a busy internal medicine practice Then fate intervened After a large arteriovenous malformation i e an abnormal connection between arteries and veins bypassing the capillary system was found during a routine examination Dr Krjckik decided to undergo an elective neurosurgical resection before beginning her residency A difficult surgery and late post operative stroke left her hemiparetic with one side of her body weaker than the other Suddenly everything changed She found herself facing a long recovery a new disability and a complete change in her career and her life In the midst of all this she longed to do something constructive Not being able to volunteer was one of my biggest frustrations she recalls When she discovered the website for the Canadian Association of Physicians with Disabilities CAPD she immediately knew she had found a way to help others while I recovered After initially agreeing to revamp their website she quickly became the organization s president I realized how isolated physicians with disabilities were and was surprised at how reticent many doctors with disabilities are to ask for help I really wanted to find a way to change that She considers her work with CAPD to be an important part of her healing Since her health crisis and her involvement with CAPD Dr Krejcik has been inspired to make changes in her own life including a switch to a specialization in psychiatry I understand the emotions people experience when they go through a life altering experience and I think I ll be able to use that to help patients She s also keenly aware of the importance of persevering when

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/advocating/many-hands/changing-perspectives (2016-02-01)
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  • Getting an early start | Alberta Medical Association
    Research is something undergraduates rarely experience Now a new program at the University of Alberta U of A is aiming to change that by creating opportunities for undergraduate students from various faculties to assist with important medical research Dr Piushkumar Mandhane an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the U of A was the driving force behind bringing the Little Bit of Help LBoH program to the university It has done really well at other centers like Stoney Brook in New York state and the University of Pennsylvania he explains And I thought there was an opportunity to put it to work here Dr Mandhane understands that some people are skeptical about undergraduate students undertaking this kind of research a reservation he says is unfounded Centers with longstanding LBoH programs have reported outstanding data One study showed that 97 of undergrad students filled out the data fields correctly And when they looked at residents versus undergrad students for chart extraction the undergrad students actually did better He also notes that faculty who participate in LBoH programs also have a ten fold increase in publications and achieve many more national grants It s a win win for everyone Undergrad researchers undergo a rigorous training program and then commit to a minimum of four hours per week for the entire school year It s a big commitment but they see the value in it And we re working toward having it recognized as a co curricular activity on student transcripts For Dr Mandhane who volunteers countless hours to leading the program it has been a rewarding experience It s amazing to see how the students have grown And when you try to teach anything to 40 undergrads you realize that everything you thought was obvious may not actually be obvious

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/advocating/many-hands/getting-an-early-start (2016-02-01)
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  • Hitting the ground running | Alberta Medical Association
    17 year olds in Canada meet the Canadian Physician Activity Guidelines for Children and Youth which require at least 60 minutes of daily moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity Dr Kimberley P Kelly a family physician and member of the Alberta Medical Association s AMA s Health Issues Council knew the statistics and wanted to do something to address childhood obesity Acting locally on childhood obesity Childhood obesity is increasing and I wanted to act locally and affect positive change said Dr Kelly I wasn t sure where to start so I began doing some research to get ideas about programs or initiatives focused on getting kids active That s how I came across Ever Active Schools Ever Active Schools is a program that encourages Alberta students to live learn and play in healthy active school communities Dr Kelly looked through their website and thought this would be a perfect way to start Helping kids to stay active and healthy In May 2012 with the support of the principal some teachers and other interested parents Dr Kelly started a health and wellness team at her sons school One of the initiatives implemented as part of the Ever Active Schools program was a youth run club This run club has operated in the fall and spring and has been a big success After my involvement in the run program I hoped similar run clubs could be initiated at other schools across the province said Dr Kelly The Alberta Medical Association has always been an advocate for healthy living so I brought forward the idea of supporting Ever Active Schools to the Health Issues Council A partnership with Ever Active Schools was formed and a collaborative youth run program was created The AMA Youth Run Club is a pilot project that aims

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/advocating/many-hands/hitting-the-ground-running (2016-02-01)
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  • The happiest place on earth | Alberta Medical Association
    for a one day trip to one of the busiest tourist destinations on the planet Disneyland There s a lot of planning explains Dr Neil D J Cooper a Calgary pediatrician and long time volunteer with Dreams Take Flight But after all this time we ve created a pretty good system for getting it all done Now in its 20th year the organization works with dozens of local agencies to take referrals for children aged seven to 12 living with an array of mental physical social emotional or medical challenges We ask the agencies to nominate two to six kids from each who meet the criteria and then we get to work getting them there It s become a labor of love for Dr Cooper and his entire family My wife Colleen gets 140 children across the border each year Often that means working with the families to complete the application forms even assisting families with literacy challenges Usually by September of each year our house explodes with paperwork laughs Dr Cooper In addition to the kids nominated by community agencies when space allows the organization will even try to include others in the adventure Many years we ll invite siblings to the airport under the auspices of seeing their brother or sister off and then we re able to say you want to come Of course the parents know in advance but the kids are pretty shocked to get the chance to go along Despite all the work it s an experience Dr Cooper treasures One of the rules is that they ve never been before so you get a lot of kids saying it s the best day ever You can see the joy in their faces He also notes that you can often see a change in

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/advocating/many-hands/happiest-place-on-earth (2016-02-01)
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  • Heart and soul | Alberta Medical Association
    summary for more information about this initiative In Punjabi Hindu and Urdu DIL means heart But for members of Alberta s South Asian community DIL may soon become synonymous with heart health thanks to the efforts of Calgary cardiologist Dr Anmol S Kapoor We know that heart disease is the leading cause of death world wide and the South Asian community has a three to five times higher risk for heart attack than other communities in Canada explains Dr Kapoor So we want to increase awareness in that community The brainchild of Dr Kapoor and his wife Raman a registered dietician the DIL Do It for Life Walk aims to reach people before heart disease strikes The event which is held in a local school and is entirely community funded begins with participants receiving a blood sugar check and a waist circumference measurement They are then directed to various 15 minute education sessions all of which are offered in an environment that overcomes language and cultural barriers Once the sessions are done we move into the gym for a warm up with some Bollywood dancing and yoga laughs Dr Kapoor We try to keep it fun and show them you don t need a gym membership even dancing in your home is great exercise After the warm up the group heads out for a walk There s no pressure they just go as far and as fast as they want The event wraps up with a lunch donated by community sponsors Response to the event has been phenomenal and it took place in Edmonton for the first time in 2013 We hear from a lot of people that there was a real need for this says Dr Kapoor And now we re looking at how we can expand this to

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/advocating/many-hands/heart-and-soul (2016-02-01)
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  • Taking a ride to conquer cancer | Alberta Medical Association
    job Watch the mud It s slippery shouted an older man I smiled As the bike slowed in the squishy mud I did the slick Charleston movement with the feet to unclip the shoes from the pedals The right shoe came out fine but my shoes were looser than I thought and panic the left shoe did not release The bike slowed to a stop in the deepest part of the mud It s a helpless feeling when you know gravity is real and something bad is going to happen please not in front of all these people It was like that National Geographic movie where the antelope is being chased by the lion and there comes the point when the antelope realizes the game is up and he collapses to the ground and lets the lion sink its teeth into his neck It was pointless to struggle I made a slow left hand side pitch into the mud and lay there like the antelope I was glad of the helmet it saved me getting a full facial mud pack even though some say it s good for the skin A woman and a boy came up Hey my son did something like that didn t yuh Brandon Brandon looked about 12 years old I churlishly refused a hand up When you do something stupid you don t want any help emphasizing your stupidity It s human nature Rising from the mud I looked like an Elizabethan theatre actor portraying night and day Bikling tip 3 Oh forget it It was now pouring rain which helped wash down my night side I parked the bike A soaking wet seat tomorrow was 12 hours away Tent A63 was at the furthest corner of the tent area Sloshing along in the mud between the rows of tents like Slum Dog Millionaire in a Bombay monsoon I located the tent threw in my bag and took out my new air mattress It inflates itself mate the young Aussie had said at Mountain Equipment Co op I waited for the magic to happen gave up and inflated it by mouth cursing all young Australians By now the rain had settled into a steady reliable downpour Some riders wandered around wrapped in silver foil looking like Christmas tree decorations Supposedly this keeps you warm Others had their feet cased in plastic bags to keep the mud out Many gave up on shoes and squelched around in bare feet Rain water poured off the edges of the canvas tent The whole area was a mud pit Our team sat in the marquee chatting and drinking wine The band played I suppose it was like Woodstock in 1969 with Country Joe and the Fish on stage although there was no public copulation There were showers in long trucks The shower was hot but of limited volume requiring a slow turning of the torso as if on a barbecue spit glorious and warm with the spray on the

    Original URL path: https://www.albertadoctors.org/advocating/many-hands/conquer-cancer (2016-02-01)
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