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  • Dedication of the Leo L. Beranek Library - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    kindness his patience and his generosity Reflecting on the meaning of libraries throughout history past Academy president Jaroslav Pelikan Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale University observed that in an Academy that uniquely brings together scientists scholars and public intellectuals it is fitting that the Library should bear the name of one who has been all three and each with great distinction The speakers at the dedication were introduced by J P Barger president of JPB Enterprises chair of the Academy s Budget Committee and a friend and colleague of Leo Beranek for more than two decades In Barger s words no one has been a more dedicated supporter of education and the arts in the city of Boston and no one has done more to take the Academy to the new heights it is reaching than Leo Beranek Kenneth Stevens C J LeBel Professor of Electrical Engineering at MIT recalled the years following World War II in which he studied and worked with Beranek on the intelligibility of processed speech one of the many areas in which Beranek advanced the field of acoustics Beranek s scientific work ranged from World War II research on military voice communication to the development of the nation s first airport noise standards to pathbreaking contributions in the design of major concert halls and opera houses in the United States Europe and Japan In 1948 Beranek cofounded the acoustics firm of Bolt Beranek and Newman redirecting its efforts to the burgeoning computer field He assembled the team that built the first packet switched computer network the ARPANET precursor of the Internet Paul La Camera president and general manager of television channel WCVB spoke of Beranek s decision in the 1960s to take on a new challenge to improve the quality of commercial television in Boston In 1971 Beranek became president and CEO of Boston Broadcasters Inc which then operated WCVB During the next decade he set about to enrich local programming by strengthening both the news and entertainment divisions of the station with in depth reporting on political issues social developments and cultural events The new standard he set for local stations across the country was recognized by the New York Times in a 1981 article entitled Some Say This Is America s Best TV Station Edward C Johnson 3d chairman and CEO of Fidelity Investments has worked with Beranek in support of Boston s cultural organizations as well as on the Academy s financial committees As Johnson noted blending his love of music his knowledge of acoustics and his natural gifts for understanding the physics of human interaction Beranek served the Boston Symphony as vice president chairman of the board of trustees and leader of the successful fundraising effort that marked the Symphony s 100th anniversary To the Academy he brought a more effective approach to program development a younger more diversified membership and a comprehensive plan to ensure a sound fiscal future In summary Johnson observed that for over fifty years

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content/publications/pubContent.aspx?d=424 (2016-02-13)
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  • Project Report: The International Criminal Court - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    important of those is the International Criminal Court an institution that would by holding perpetrators responsible for crimes against humanity break the ancient cycle of atrocity and revenge that has turned the wheel of so much violence Temporary tribunals have been established to deal with the genocide in Rwanda and the outrages in former Yugoslavia but the ICC would be permanent and potential war criminals everywhere would know it At Kofi Annan s urging the treaty establishing the ICC was on the agenda of the summit of world leaders at the UN last week although the media took little notice when the Marshall Islands became the 99th nation to sign The United States was one of only six nations with Iraq and China out of 120 to oppose the initial call for such a treaty in 1998 but now that it is on the table Washington has yet to formally take a position one way or the other As is true of so much on the international scene the American disposition toward this treaty is locked in the irons of partisan politics an ambivalent administration and popular indifference In an attempt to help break that stasis the American Academy of Arts and Sciences has just released a report The United States and the International Criminal Court The Choices Ahead authored by Sarah Sewall and Carl Kaysen two veterans of the national security debate They take up the arguments for and against the treaty in the context of pending legislation that would outlaw American participation an analysis that makes clear why this question should be at the center of the national conversation American opposition to the ICC might seem strange not only because this nation firmly pressed for the establishment of the Rwanda and Yugoslavia tribunals but because the entire enterprise of holding war criminals individually responsible for their actions goes back to the Nuremberg and Tokyo tribunals after World War II which were centrally American But as Sewall and Kaysen point out those could be taken as instances of victor s justice which does nothing to alter the cycle of killing and revenge An authentic alternative to war requires in their words a free standing independent court to insure that international law would be applied equally without political favoritism But that means that the United States too would be subject to judgment and there s the rub Sewall and Kaysen observe that to the other nations working to establish this court including many of our closest allies the ICC represents an acid test of America s commitment to international and universal concepts of justice and human rights its willingness to be bound by the rule it establishes for others Does our traditional sense of ourselves as an exceptional nation or our contemporary self image as the last superpower mean that we can impose on others standards and strictures that we reject for ourselves Congressional mainly Republican opponents of the ICC are apparently content to answer this damning question yes Jesse

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content/publications/pubContent.aspx?d=425 (2016-02-13)
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  • In Celebration: The 220th Anniversary of the Academy - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    spirits committed her soul to God and her body to B Bicknell and into bed she leaped What makes his prose so vivid it seems to me what made it possible for him to transform ordinary events into heightened dramas was his sensuous apprehension of experience He responded first and fundamentally to the tangible audible visual qualities of life He felt the world directly and sensitively before he thought about it and since he was immensely articulate and verbally inventive his writing sparkles with unstylized personally idiomatic images of the tangible the tactile world The images the metaphors are at times brilliant a cabin filled with straw where the master of the house his wife and four children all pigged in together a cow s teats that strutt with milk a Moravian prayer meeting where the women s covered heads resembled a garden of white cabbage kissed girls glowing like furnaces the Spanish landscape like a bird deprived of its feathers a small spungy muscular substance growing fast to the rock in figure and feeling resembling a young girl s breast Such sensuous vividness such idiomatic concreteness was not restricted to the single metaphor or phrase nor is it to be found only in the writings of his youth In his tour of France before taking up his duties as co ambassador at Versailles he visited the chateau at Chantilly and wrote Walked around the gardens fish ponds grottoes and waterspouts And looked at the carps and swan that came up to us for bread Whistle or throw a bit of bread into the water and hundreds of carps large and fat as butter will be seen swimming near the top of the water and will assemble all in a huddle before you Some of them will thrust up their mouths to the surface and gape at you like young birds in a nest to their parents for food While we were viewing the statue of Montmorency Mademoiselle de Bourbon came out into the round house at the corner of the castle dressed in beautiful white her hair uncombed hanging and flowing about her shoulders with a book in her hand and leaned over the bar of iron But soon perceiving that she had caught my eye and that I viewed her more attentively than she fancied she rose up with that majesty and grace which persons of her birth affect if they are not taught turned her hair off of both of her shoulders with her hands in a manner that I could not comprehend and decently stepped back into the chamber and was seen no more It was the vividness of his apprehension the drama he saw in everyday life and his fierce and strict puritanical integrity that made him view Franklin s life in Paris with horror The great man Adams recorded in his autobiography slept late and when he managed to finish breakfast he was surrounded by all sorts of odd types philosophers academicians and economists atheists deists and libertines and by crowds of women and children who flocked around just to look at him Eventually Adams reported they would all amble off to dinner and the theater and an evening in the salons As far as Adams could see Franklin did very little work and what he did was done with an appalling lack of secrecy Versailles was a snake pit of intrigue and Franklin s desk Adams said was a regular sieve Spies were everywhere but Franklin seemed not to care He had nothing to hide he said so the more people knew about him and his work the better If I was sure that my valet was a spy Adams quoted him saying as probably he is I think I should not discharge him for that if in other respects I liked him Adams could not believe that such a bland innocence was sincere hence it was highly suspicious and then to compound the mystery of Franklin s behavior it turned out that the loose flow of secret information worked to America s advantage since in effect it played Britain off against France in such a way as to stimulate France s interest in supporting the American rebellion But Franklin s slack behavior and the negotiations with the French government did not wholly absorb Adams s mind in Paris He became keenly aware of France s leadership in science and scholarship and particularly recognized the importance of its Royal Academy of Sciences where in 1778 to his immense chagrin he had to witness French high society s joy in seeing Franklin embraced by Voltaire kissed on both cheeks by Europe s greatest intellectual and the cry immediately spread Adams wrote gloomily in his autobiography from this great theatre of philosophy and frivolity through the whole Kingdom and I suppose over all Europe Qu il etoit charmant Oh Il etoit enchantant to see Solon and Sophicles embracing He quickly saw in the French Academy of Sciences a model vehicle for the advancement of the cultural life of his beloved state and nation And it did nothing for his peace of mind and much for his ambition that again and again French academicians and men of science and letters entertained him with questions about Franklin s Philosophical Society speaking with eulogiums on the wisdom of that institution and encomiums on some publications in their transactions So it was in 1779 on a short return trip to Boston with the memory of the French academy and all those encomiums on Franklin s creation burning in his mind that Adams made the proposal that resulted in the founding of this Academy The occasion was a dinner in honor of the French ambassador held in a second floor room in Harvard Hall on August 24 Adams was seated next to the Reverend Samuel Cooper a fervent patriot and member of the Harvard Corporation Adams was no one to waste time in idle chatter and so he instructed Cooper

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content/publications/pubContent.aspx?d=426 (2016-02-13)
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  • March / April 2000 Bulletin - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    and Project Publications Meetings Overview Induction 2015 Upcoming Meetings and Events Friday Forum 2015 2016 Schedule Past Meetings and Events Fellowships Overview Visiting Scholars Program Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy Policy Fellowship in the Humanities Education and the Arts Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password Submit a Question Date 12 5 2012 Name Email Needed only if you expect a reply Subject Message Home Publication Overview Bulletin March April 2000 Bulletin Bulletin i align right style height 250px border width 0px Bulletin March April 2000 Bulletin Published by The American Academy of Arts and Sciences Cambridge MA 02138 2000 Table of Contents Calendar of Events Academy Update Goals of 2001 and Beyond A Plan for Renewal Pugwash Report Study Group on Intervention Sovereignty and International Security Jeffrey Boutwell Stated Meeting Reports How to Organize a Rich and Successful Group Lessons from Natural Experiments in History Jared Diamond Gut Reactions How Caterpillars and People Disarm Alarming Substances with Cytochrome P540 May R Berenbaum Find Dædalus Issues View and order copies of Dædalus from 2001 to the present Earlier issues can be found on the journal database

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content/publications/publication.aspx?i=314 (2016-02-13)
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  • Project Publications Meetings Overview Induction 2015 Upcoming Meetings and Events Friday Forum 2015 2016 Schedule Past Meetings and Events Fellowships Overview Visiting Scholars Program Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy Policy Fellowship in the Humanities Education and the Arts Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password Panel I The American Military and American Democracy Gregg F Martin

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/binaries/video/streamPlayer.aspx?i=165 (2016-02-13)
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  • Publications Meetings Overview Induction 2015 Upcoming Meetings and Events Friday Forum 2015 2016 Schedule Past Meetings and Events Fellowships Overview Visiting Scholars Program Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy Policy Fellowship in the Humanities Education and the Arts Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password Panel I The American Military and American Democracy Thomas P Bostick Thomas

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/binaries/video/streamPlayer.aspx?i=164 (2016-02-13)
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  • Monographs and Project Publications Meetings Overview Induction 2015 Upcoming Meetings and Events Friday Forum 2015 2016 Schedule Past Meetings and Events Fellowships Overview Visiting Scholars Program Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy Policy Fellowship in the Humanities Education and the Arts Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password Panel I The American Military and American Democracy David

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/binaries/video/streamPlayer.aspx?i=163 (2016-02-13)
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  • Papers Monographs and Project Publications Meetings Overview Induction 2015 Upcoming Meetings and Events Friday Forum 2015 2016 Schedule Past Meetings and Events Fellowships Overview Visiting Scholars Program Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy Policy Fellowship in the Humanities Education and the Arts Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password Panel II The Constitution the Practice of Democracy

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/binaries/video/streamPlayer.aspx?i=167 (2016-02-13)
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