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  • Scientific Advances and their Impact on Society - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    and Events Friday Forum 2015 2016 Schedule Past Meetings and Events Fellowships Overview Visiting Scholars Program Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy Policy Fellowship in the Humanities Education and the Arts Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password Scientific Advances and their Impact on Society La Jolla CA October 21 2015 Welcome Call to Order Jonathan Fanton President American Academy of Arts and Sciences Video Welcome Gordon N Gill Professor of Medicine and of Cellular and Molecular Medicine Emeritus University of California San Diego School of Medicine Video Introduction Lawrence Goldstein Distinguished Professor in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine and the Department of Neurosciences University of California San Diego School of Medicine Director UC San Diego Stem Cell Program Scientific Director Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine Director Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center Video Presentations J Craig Venter Co Founder Executive Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Human Longevity Inc Video Lisa Madlensky Associate Professor Department of Family Medicine and Public Health University of California San Diego Medical Center Program Director and Genetic Counselor Family Cancer Genetics Program Moores UCSD Cancer Center Video John H Evans Professor

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?i=22024 (2016-02-13)
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  • 2026th Stated Meeting: Scientific Advances and their Impact on Society - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    work with the UCSD family in the coming years Earlier this month the Academy welcomed its 235th class at our annual induction ceremony in Cambridge including five new members from the San Diego area Phil S Baran from the Scripps Research Institute Joseph R Ecker and Dennis D M O Leary from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies and Patricia Smith Churchland and David Kleinfeld from UC San Diego With the election of these five remarkable scholars there are now 120 members of the Academy in the San Diego area Please join me in congratulating them on their election to the Academy San Diego was well represented at this year s Induction as both Phil Baran and Patricia Churchland spoke on behalf of their respective membership classes Professor Baran for Class I Mathematical and Physical Sciences and Professor Churchland for Class II Biological Sciences Both speakers passionately described their fascination with the natural world what Professor Baran called the promise of new unthinkable phenomena waiting to be uncovered Professor Churchland spoke of the insights into human nature that have been gained by merging the disciplines of neuroscience philosophy evolutionary biology genetics and anthropology The Academy s function is not simply to honor excellence in a broad range of disciplines and professions Its members also conduct studies of critical policy issues and debate the most pressing issues of the day Our ability to draw on experts from around the world and from every discipline and profession is the Academy s biggest asset in providing thoughtful independent trusted advice to the nation and beyond Of particular relevance to today s program is a recent Academy report on science and engineering research entitled Restoring the Foundation The Vital Role of Research in Preserving the American Dream Released in September 2014 Restoring the Foundation encourages a greater emphasis on long range planning in the area of science and engineering It encourages funders and policymakers to support basic research that may not yield immediate results but that may ultimately prove transformative The report s recommendations have found a strong backing in both the public and private sectors including among members of congress from both sides of the aisle This summer ten American business leaders issued the Innovation Imperative a public statement in support of several of our recommendations Signers included the heads of Merck Novartis John Deere Boeing Northrop Grumman Lockheed Martin and Microsoft The statement was endorsed by over 300 additional companies universities and NGOs from across all 50 states including locally UCSD and Qualcomm Yesterday the Academy organized a briefing for Congress to highlight the importance of federally supported basic research for private sector innovation The event featured opening remarks from Senators Lamar Alexander R Tennessee Chris Coons D Delaware and Gary Peters D Michigan and Representative Randy Hultgren R Illinois 14th Also included was commentary from Academy Members Norman Augustine co chair of Restoring the Foundation Jeannette Wing Corporate Vice President at Microsoft Research and Roger Perlmutter President of Merck Research Laboratories

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=21994 (2016-02-13)
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  • Meeting with Foreign Honorary Members in Russia - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    its many recommendations The Heart of the Matter suggested several ways to broaden public and scholarly access to digital resources including revised fair use and copyright regulations and it encouraged new partnerships to ensure that all students have access to quality online teaching materials especially those in economically disadvantaged K 12 schools Another commission just finished a report on the need for governments to invest in basic research in science and technology We are following up with a new project examining the state of public trust in science and scientists Another new commission will examine how Americans are receiving their postsecondary education and how to expand access at a price people can afford And yet another commission just launched will look at the teaching of foreign languages Not all of our projects deal with scholarship and higher education Our Global Nuclear Future Initiative is studying how to expand the use of nuclear power safely Another project is exploring how technology think drones pose new dilemmas in the ethical use of force The Academy is also studying the threat to stability posed by weak and failing states Another group is asking whether the world is entering a new nuclear age where the framework that has provided stability for the past decades is eroding The Academy does not want to look at those important questions through an American centric lens We want to engage our Foreign Honorary Members in all the work we do whether on the importance of the humanities the safe pursuit of nuclear power or how best to address the dangers of weak states The Academy s ties to Russia go almost back to our founding Mathematician Leonhard Euler the first Foreign Honorary Member from Russia was elected as part of the second class of members in 1782 five years before the Academy elected Thomas Jefferson Euler was born in Switzerland and lived in Berlin during his middle years but he was elected as a member of the St Petersburg Academy of Sciences where he spent the majority of his life Euler s letter accepting membership written in Latin is hanging on the wall outside of the Academy s main auditorium Euler was certainly the most productive mathematician of his age His collected works fill over 80 volumes much of it written after he lost his vision in 1766 when he was already 59 years old In addition to electing Russian scholars 82 Foreign Honorary Members the American Academy has also paid special attention to Russian subjects and themes in its public and scholarly programming In the 1850s the Academy was engaged in a publication exchange with learned societies in Russia including the Imperial Academy of Sciences in St Petersburg the Administration of Mines in Russia and the Imperial Mineralogical Society And throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries the Academy examined topics in international relations economics arms control and even literary studies all with a special emphasis on Russia and Russian culture Some examples In 1945 astronomer Harlow Shapley

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=21992 (2016-02-13)
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  • Re-Imagining the Global Nuclear Order Workshop - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    the common good Our ability to draw on experts from around the world and from every discipline and profession is our biggest asset in providing thoughtful independent advice While our research program is currently organized around four broad areas for the last 60 years global security has been our most enduring interest In 1959 a group of Academy members including Donald Brennan Edward Teller Henry Kissinger and Thomas Schelling established an Arms Control Committee to study possible pathways to de escalate the nuclear confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union It was this committee that coined the term strategic stability which then became the central principle underpinning the nuclear postures of both superpowers The byproduct of this committee s work a volume of the Academy s journal Dædalus was later described by President John F Kennedy as the bible of arms control In 1963 the Academy and several of its members including Eugene Rabinowitch at the University of Illinois and Leo Szilard at the University of Chicago played a critical role in the creation of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs with the goal of averting the dangers resulting from the global deployment of thermonuclear weapons Academy members have played an active role in the work of Pugwash including Steve Miller at Harvard who is now serving as co chair of its executive committee as well as co chair of the Academy s Global Nuclear Future Initiative In 1982 the Academy established its Committee on International Security Studies CISS which remains active to this day One of the committee s first activities was to convene the Nuclear Weapons Freeze and Arms Control Conference with the goal of bridging the gap between the arms control community and the pro WMD free zone supporters The following year in direct response to the speech by President Reagan that launched the Strategic Defense Initiative CISS initiated a project to explore the implications of placing weapons in space In the late 1980s another Academy study explored the interface between the Anti Ballistic Missile Treaty and nuclear deterrence The Academy released the study with a foreword by Senator Sam Nunn who is today an advisor to the Academy s Global Nuclear Future Initiative Since 2008 the Global Nuclear Future Initiative led by Scott Sagan and Steven Miller has drawn on these previous five decades of scholarship to better understand the implications of the expansion of nuclear energy around the world and to design concrete policy recommendations that could advance global nuclear governance The initiative s work includes efforts to address and tame the problem of threats from insiders as well as to improve the way nuclear aspirant and nuclear fuel legacy countries manage the nuclear fuel cycle and the resulting high level nuclear waste For over a half century the Academy has facilitated conversations and studies on arms control and nuclear non proliferation in a quest for a more stable and secure world But much work remains to be done This conference

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=21993 (2016-02-13)
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  • The Evolving Role of Technology in Higher Education - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    Public Good Publications Overview Dædalus Journal of the Academy Bulletin Magazine of the Academy Books Research Papers Monographs and Project Publications Meetings Overview Induction 2015 Upcoming Meetings and Events Friday Forum 2015 2016 Schedule Past Meetings and Events Fellowships Overview Visiting Scholars Program Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy Policy Fellowship in the Humanities Education and the Arts Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password The Evolving Role of Technology in Higher Education New York University September 17 2015 Welcome John Sexton President New York University Video Welcome Call to Order Jonathan F Fanton President American Academy of Arts Sciences Video Introduction Matthew S Santirocco Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs Professor of Classics and Angelo J Ranieri Director of Ancient Studies New York University Video Presentations Nicholas Lemann Joseph Pulitzer II and Edith Pulitzer Moore Professor of Journalism and Dean Emeritus Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism Video Kevin Guthrie President and Co Founder ITHAKA Video Daphne Koller President and Co Founder Coursera Inc Rajeev Motwani Professor of Computer Science Stanford University Video Upcoming Meetings and Other Events View the Academy calendar of upcoming meetings and

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22023 (2016-02-13)
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  • 2022nd Stated Meeting: Evolving Role of Technology in Higher Education - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    you know the Academy was founded in 1780 during the American Revolution by John Adams James Bowdoin John Hancock and other leaders who helped to establish the new nation The Academy s founders believed that a strong republic must be grounded in open discourse engaged scholarship and an informed and active citizenry Over time the Academy has expanded to include leaders in all fields and disciplines many of whom work together through the Academy to address issues both of timely and abiding concern The topic of tonight s discussion is the evolving role of technology in higher education In recent years the pace of change has quickened and digital technology now touches nearly every aspect of the educational experience from web based academic advising to blended learning where students receive a portion of their instruction online and a portion in person The American Academy has explored this topic at several points in the past Fifty years ago in 1966 the Academy held a Stated Meeting titled Some Impacts of the Computer on Society Two speakers Ithiel de Sola Pool Professor of Political Science at MIT and Robert Mario Fano Ford Professor of Engineering at MIT analyzed the effect of emerging large scale computer facilities on American education According to a summary of this discussion that appeared in the Academy s Bulletin The computer helps the student to select his courses on the basis of information which has been programmed into it the information includes requirements for high school graduation and college entrance the records of a student s past performance and statistics compiled from the records of other students in a similar situation In this way the student receives advice pertinent to him alone and is not confused by extraneous material Nearly a decade later in 1975 Northeastern University President Asa Knowles wrote in an issue of Dædalus titled Cooperative Education The Catalyst for Innovation and Relevance Patterns of instruction have been broadened to make use of the many new methods made possible by the growth of educational technology From the language laboratories of a generation ago we have moved into an age of computer assisted instruction cassettes videotapes closed circuit television and radio Courses are given by public television Library networks and microfiches have made vast areas of knowledge instantly available New calendars based on new patterns have been introduced to allow for a greater variety of educational experiences As a society we are still responding to the changes that Pool Fano and Knowles identified And as an Academy we continue to examine their implications for the creation and distribution of scholarly knowledge Many of these issues will be central to the work of the Academy s new commission on postsecondary education That commission supported by the Carnegie Corporation of New York acknowledges that postsecondary education continues to be one of the most important avenues of opportunity in America today and that there are ever more options for how where and when Americans receive their postsecondary education New populations

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22000 (2016-02-13)
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  • Symposium on Cognitive Computing - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    this kind took place on May 10 1876 when Alexander Graham Bell presented the first paper on his new invention the telephone at an Academy meeting Here is the way Bell described the first telephone call to Academy Fellows as published in our proceedings When two persons sang simultaneously into the instrument two notes were emitted simultaneously by the telephone in the other house A friend was sent into the adjoining building to note the effect produced by articulate speech I placed the membrane of the telephone near my mouth and uttered the sentence Do you understand what I say Presently an answer was returned through the instrument in my hand Articulate words proceeded from the clock spring attached to the membrane and I heard the sentence Yes I understand you perfectly Decades later in a speech delivered in Boston at the first meeting of the Telephone Pioneers Association Bell explained his reason for presenting this paper at the Academy In the case of new inventions we are generally led to believe that the public is ready to swallow anything but that grave scientific men are the most skeptical of all I found this not to be true in the case of the telephone The public generally and the business men of the country were very slow to perceive any value in the telephone The scientific world on the other hand took it up at once My first paper upon the subject was delivered here in Boston before the American Academy of Arts and Sciences on May 10 1876 For Bell it was the approval of the grave scientific men as represented by the American Academy that helped to transform his telephone from a technological fad into a device that permanently changed the way humans communicate Then as now Academy members have the expertise and the imagination as well as the skepticism to be able to see the true value of technological innovations to recognize new opportunities for adoption and to explore unintended consequences It is in this tradition that we have gathered to discuss the potential benefits and consequences of cognitive computing Our focus today is IBM s cognitive technology known as Watson The New York Times described Watson as having an eerily humanlike ability to untangle astonishingly coy clues Like other cognitive systems it can analyze language and answer questions But unlike other systems designed to offer a single solution to a problem Watson generates hundreds of possible solutions With training by professionals Watson may well address some of the most complex questions of our times It also presents new challenges for researchers who must learn new methods as technology changes and accelerates the pace of discovery For example after processing seventy thousand academic papers related to a particular cancer gene Watson was able to discover eight new drug target sites on the gene Given this enormous potential how will scientific research evolve in the next twenty years and what adjustments will we need to make along the

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22001 (2016-02-13)
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  • The Columbus Partnership - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    letters will demonstrate Each year a new class of Academy members is elected by their peers They are drawn from every field and profession and many then volunteer their time and expertise to Academy projects collaborative cross disciplinary efforts that are in every instance concerned with the state of our nation and the world Early studies focused on the soils and minerals of this continent on the geography of the West on the peculiarities of the American version of the English language The Academy was the venue for the earliest American debates about Darwin s theory of evolution It was instrumental in the creation of major scholarly organizations like the Smithsonian Institution and the American Council of Learned Societies It encouraged the development of an entirely new field of inquiry with its work on nuclear arms control in the early 1960s It was even the location chosen by Alexander Graham Bell for his first presentation of the idea of the telephone Over the years the Academy has also examined the theme of your retreat The Power of Cities primarily through our quarterly journal Dædalus including a 1961 issue on The Future Metropolis and a 1968 issue on The Conscience of the City In the latter Lyle C Fitch then City Administrator under New York City Mayor Robert Wagner contributed an article titled Eight Goals for an Urbanizing America One of the goals Fitch mentioned seems particularly relevant to the work in which you are engaged today A national commitment to the work of developing the urban frontier as pervasive and compelling as the national commitment to developing the western frontier in the nineteenth century Such a commitment must draw on federal state and local governments business and labor and educational religious and other organizations It must be based on a

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22002 (2016-02-13)
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