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  • The Global Nuclear Future: The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Grand Bargain—Its Historical Evolution, Present Challenges, and Future Opportunities - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    under the leadership of Professor Scott Sagan of Stanford Professor Steven Miller of Harvard and former Argonne National Laboratory Director Robert Rosner now at the University of Chicago The project supports the creation of regional networks of nuclear expertise in Southeast Asia and the Middle East to help countries make more educated decisions on nuclear policies Ultimately the purpose of GNF is to ensure that if a country decides to pursue nuclear power it does so in a responsible manner Alongside its regional approach GNF has also sought to contribute to the advancement of what is conventionally called the global nuclear order We have worked and continue to work to produce scholarship that could foster institutional innovation in nuclear governance and strengthen existing institutions such as the NPT and the IAEA Some of you might remember Shared Responsibilities for Nuclear Disarmament A Global Debate an occasional paper authored by Professor Sagan in 2011 In it he advances the idea that in addition to the NPT framework nuclear disarmament has to be understood and tackled within the broader framework of general disarmament whose success or failure is ultimately the responsibility of all Similarly in 2012 an occasional paper by Professor Miller Nuclear Collisions Discord Reform the Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime sought to investigate the root causes of divisions within the NPT community Today we look forward to continued investigation of the role played by the NPT in ensuring global nuclear cooperation and how the NPT grand bargain has evolved and with what consequences Despite its imperfections the NPT stands as a leading example of what can be achieved when nations decide to bypass their ideological differences and cooperate for the greater good Yet as the international community gathers to review the NPT geopolitical tensions are mounting arms control negotiations have stalled and risks of further military escalations continue to rise in different regions around the world It is in these difficult circumstances that the Academy can play an important role by looking historically at how the international community has successfully overcome similar challenges in the past and by distilling best practices that might be applicable to today s context As most of you know the American Academy was founded in 1780 to honor excellence in a broad range of disciplines and professions and to develop rigorous scholarship that could better inform policy making and ultimately advance the common good The Academy has adopted an objective and multidisciplinary approach to conducting studies Indeed our ability to draw on experts from around the world and from every discipline and profession is the Academy s biggest asset in providing thoughtful independent advice The Academy s research program is organized around four broad areas 1 Science Engineering and Technology 2 Humanities Arts and Education 3 American Institutions and the Public Good and 4 Global Security and International Affairs For the last sixty years global security has been our most enduring interest A group of Academy members including Donald Brennan Edward Teller Henry Kissinger and Thomas Schelling

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22003 (2016-02-13)
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  • Restoring The Foundation: Reviving the U.S. Science, Engineering, and Technology Enterprise - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    inauguration of Rice s first president Edgar Odell Lovett Lovett used his inaugural speech to lay out his vision for the future of Rice as an institution of both technical and liberal learning remarking The new institution thus aspires to university standing of the highest grade and would achieve its earliest claims to this distinction in those regions of inquiry and investigation where the methods of modern science are more directly applicable For the present it is proposed to assign no upper limit to its educational endeavor Certainly these words still ring true at Rice which has no limit to its ever rising distinction They also hold a special relevance for the American Academy Our purpose as described in our Charter of Incorporation is to cultivate every art and science which may tend to advance the interest honor dignity and happiness of a free independent and virtuous people We pursue the goals of our charter through two primary functions first by honoring excellence in a broad range of disciplines and professions through election as a member of the American Academy and second by exploring challenges facing our nation indeed the world as opportunities and by bringing high quality objective research to bear on policy making We convene studies in four broad areas 1 The Humanities Arts and Education 2 Science Engineering and Technology 3 Global Security and International Affairs and 4 American Institutions and the Public Good Our members contribute to these studies in numerous ways including by serving as members of advisory committees participating in the preparation of policy reports and writing for our quarterly journal Dædalus Our ability to draw on experts from around the world and from every discipline and profession is the Academy s biggest asset in providing thoughtful independent advice to the nation and beyond The Academy s interest in Texas goes back to its earliest days as a state On February 13 1855 G P Bond a Harvard astronomer and Academy Fellow presented a portion of the U S Mexico boundary survey at the Hall of the American Academy in Boston This survey began right after the Mexican American War and took seven years to complete The report detailed accounts of topography and botany both written and through vivid illustrations and captivated the audience Professor Bond s presentation was requested by another Academy member Major W H Emory a military engineer astronomer and surveyor who had led the Boundary Commission The Academy s ties to Texas grow stronger as members of the Rice faculty are elected to its membership This past fall the Academy welcomed its 234th class at our annual induction ceremony in Cambridge which included a distinguished scholar from Rice Pol Spanos Professor of Mechanical Engineering and of Civil Engineering Professor Spanos joins a distinguished group of seventeen Academy members at Rice including three members elected in 2013 John Mendelsohn former President of the M D Anderson Cancer Center and now a Fellow in Health and Technology Policy here at the Baker

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22004 (2016-02-13)
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  • Dædalus Event on Successful Aging of Societies - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    immediately agreed to support it Along with social scientist Robert Kahn Jack had led an earlier MacArthur Network on Successful Aging that fundamentally changed the way we view the aging process from a period of inevitable decline to a stage in life in which mental and even physical vitality can be enhanced Jack and Robert s path breaking book Successful Aging published in 1998 brought together the remarkable results of that first MacArthur study on aging Many of the essays in our newest issue of Dædalus are authored by members of the current MacArthur Network an interdisciplinary group of scholars working to address the challenges and opportunities facing America as it becomes an aging society I would like to thank Jack for including the Academy and Dædalus in the Network s important work Now a little bit about the American Academy As some of you may know the Academy was founded in 1780 during the American Revolution by John Adams James Bowdoin John Hancock and other leaders who helped to establish the new nation its government and its Constitution The Academy s founders believed that a strong republic must be grounded in open discourse engaged scholarship and an informed and active citizenry Adams was the principal founder of the Academy as well as its intellectual leader In his letter accepting the presidency of the Academy in 1797 he described his vision for the institution a vision of intellectual exchange and collaboration in service of the public good The Unanimity with which the members of this Academy are attached to the Union of our American States their Constitutions of Government and the Federal Administration is the happiest omen of the future Peace Liberty Safety and Prosperity of our Country Through publications like our newest issue of Dædalus and special programs like today s meeting the American Academy remains true to its founders ideals We continue to concern ourselves with the Peace Liberty Safety and Prosperity of our Country often by convening leaders from many disciplines and professions to think together about common challenges and opportunities I would like to share a few examples from the Academy s archives about some of the Academy s early work on life expectancy At a meeting held on May 28 1781 a special committee appointed to arrange the several subjects which should principally engage the attention of the Academy recommended that a fifth class of Academy members examine the various diseases of the Country the causes of disorders peculiar to the country and the longevity of the inhabitants The Academy has been interested in life expectancy since its very beginning recognizing that the wisdom and knowledge of our older citizens are vital to our future More recently an Academy Committee on Annual Conferences reported in 1948 that it had selected the problem of aging as its focus for that year R G Hoskins of Harvard Medical School working with a small subcommittee decided that the complexity of aging required a series of probing meetings before

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22005 (2016-02-13)
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  • Technology, Surveillance & the Contemporary Self - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    Data Forum Humanities Arts and Education Science Engineering and Technology Global Security and International Affairs American Institutions and the Public Good Publications Overview Dædalus Journal of the Academy Bulletin Magazine of the Academy Books Research Papers Monographs and Project Publications Meetings Overview Induction 2015 Upcoming Meetings and Events Friday Forum 2015 2016 Schedule Past Meetings and Events Fellowships Overview Visiting Scholars Program Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy Policy Fellowship in the Humanities Education and the Arts Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password Technology Surveillance the Contemporary Self House of the Academy April 16 2015 Welcome Jonathan F Fanton President American Academy of Arts Sciences Video Speakers Peter L Galison Joseph Pellegrino University Professor Department of the History of Science and Department of Physics Harvard University Video Jonathan Zittrain George Bemis Professor of Law Harvard Law School and Harvard Kennedy School Co Founder Director and Faculty Chair Berkman Center for Internet Society Harvard University Video Upcoming Meetings and Other Events View the Academy calendar of upcoming meetings and events Friday Forum Schedule View the 2015 2016 Friday Forum schedule Past Meetings Lectures and Other Events Click

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?i=21823 (2016-02-13)
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  • 2020th Stated Meeting: Technology, Surveillance, and the Contemporary Self - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    far flung computer networks or the consequences of digital surveillance on the way we understand ourselves as individuals in a wider world The Academy held a Stated Meeting on October 12 1966 titled Some Impacts of the Computer on Society Two speakers Ithiel de Sola Pool Professor of Political Science at MIT and Robert Mario Fano Ford Professor of Engineering at MIT analyzed the development of emerging large scale computer facilities and their effect on American society According to an account published in our Bulletin Professor Fano who was the first speaker explained that it is technically possible for a computer system to be made to act as a knowledgeable assistant to any individual or group even to those without specialized experience in computer programming He then anticipated contemporary networking capabilities stating that to act in this role the computer system must be accessible to individuals both physically and intellectually in other words a person must be able to carry out a conversation with a computer not in machine code but in a language suitable to him as a human being and to the subject of conversation Moreover since many intellectual activities are inherently cooperative in nature the system must also be simultaneously accessible to many people In his response Professor Pool anticipated the very concerns we are here to discuss this evening Again from the Bulletin account Mr Pool believes that the most serious problem will be that of privacy In the course of our daily life at school in business at the bank and in the retail trade we will leave behind a trail of data in some computer s memory All these records are likely to become part of a unified utility system If we then consider the tremendous volume of records that are generated in the

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22007 (2016-02-13)
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  • MIT Online Learning Summit - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    MIT Program Committee for organizing this important summit and for bringing such a distinguished group here for a day of discussion During a 2010 symposium on Technology and the Public Good here at the Academy which took place during our annual Induction Weekend Paul Sagan Executive Vice Chairman of Akamai reminded us that the digital age is creating an information and communication renaissance but it is not serving all people and communities in an equal way Many of your conversations this morning have begun to address the problem of access in important ways and the American Academy would like to help continue these conversations I hope that we can find ways to work together in future As some of you may know the Academy was founded in 1780 during the American Revolution by John Adams James Bowdoin John Hancock and other leaders who helped to establish the new nation its government and its constitution The Academy s founders believed that a strong republic must be grounded in open discourse engaged scholarship and an informed and active citizenry Adams was the key figure in the creation of this institution On August 4 1776 he wrote to his wife Abigail from the Continental Congress in Philadelphia If ever I get through this scene of politics and war I will spend the remainder of my days in endeavoring to instruct my countrymen in the art of making the most of their abilities and virtues an art which they have hitherto too much neglected A philosophical society shall be established at Boston if I have wit and address enough to accomplish it sometime or other It took Adams only four years to achieve this goal the creation of an institution that draws its members from every field and profession who volunteer their time and expertise and collaborate with other members to explore new ideas provide sound advice to decision makers and in the words of our charter cultivate every art and science which may tend to advance the interest honor dignity and happiness of a free independent and virtuous people The American Academy has always counted among its members the most distinguished leaders of academia business and public affairs as a tour of our atrium and through our remarkable collection of acceptance letters will demonstrate I encourage you to browse the collection when you have a free moment today This building is the American Academy s first permanent home designed by Kallmann McKinnell Wood Architects to be what they called a house of the mind We have been here in Norton s Woods since 1980 but our members come from nearly every state and thirty six countries around the world We bring them together through our publications our public programming like an event we hosted last week at Emory University on Teaching and the Digital Humanities and our projects which reflect the interests of our members and address challenges that can be understood and met through the application of sound research and good judgment

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22008 (2016-02-13)
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  • Lincoln Project Regional Forum: New York - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    we began publication in 1955 These include American Education Still Separate Still Unequal in 1995 Education Yesterday Education Tomorrow in 1998 and On Education in 2002 For the Fall 1974 issue American Higher Education Toward an Uncertain Future intellectual historian Frank E Manuel wrote a rather critical essay about the evolution of the modern university entitled Clio Vanishes from New York City Although Manuel regretted some of the changes taking place on campuses including the loosening standards of most college curricula he made a compelling case for the continuing importance of higher education for both this city and the nation as a whole The universities of New York are primarily engaged in turning the young men and women of the Greater New York area into doctors lawyers architects engineers dentists scientists and technicians of various sorts teachers for lower and higher schools priests ministers and rabbis business specialists and administrators In fact everything that the society currently needs to perpetuate itself and to increase its scientific and technological knowledge as well as to amuse itself and heal its self inflicted wounds I note that the professions Manuel mentions doctors engineers teachers all require training and certification in addition to a bachelor s degree And they are precisely the kinds of professions that are supported and advanced by our public research institutions for example tomorrow s computer programmers and systems designers data analysts and biomedical engineers The American Academy s Lincoln Project named for Abraham Lincoln to commemorate his role in signing the Morrill Act in 1862 sees the preparation of the next generation as a challenge but also as a great opportunity By 2018 high skills jobs will represent 33 percent of all job openings Roughly 78 percent of all jobs will require education beyond high school and most will depend on some degree of technical preparation in addition to preparation in other disciplines Public research universities will be critical in helping the nation meet this demand In 2013 these institutions awarded 41 percent of all baccalaureate or graduate degrees in areas of national need as defined by the federal government biology sciences life sciences chemistry computer and information sciences engineering foreign languages and literature mathematics nursing physics and educational evaluation research and statistics The SUNY system alone accounts for 1 billion annually in research expenditures supporting more than ten thousand research projects across sixty four campuses each an opportunity for education as well as innovation In effect public research universities are educating our future leaders which is why the Lincoln Project seeks to preserve and strengthen them at a time of diminished public support I think we all recognize that postsecondary education has become a prerequisite for personal development and national progress in the twenty first century This assumption drives the Lincoln Project It has also inspired a new three year Academy project to examine the state of undergraduate education in America The commission with funding from the Carnegie Corporation of New York will include national leaders in education

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22009 (2016-02-13)
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  • Teaching and the Digital Humanities - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    Security and International Affairs American Institutions and the Public Good Publications Overview Dædalus Journal of the Academy Bulletin Magazine of the Academy Books Research Papers Monographs and Project Publications Meetings Overview Induction 2015 Upcoming Meetings and Events Friday Forum 2015 2016 Schedule Past Meetings and Events Fellowships Overview Visiting Scholars Program Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy Policy Fellowship in the Humanities Education and the Arts Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password Teaching and the Digital Humanities Emory University April 2 2015 Welcome James W Wagner President Emory University Video Introduction Jonathan F Fanton President American Academy of Arts and Sciences Video Moderator Erika Farr Head of Digital Archives Manuscript Archives and Rare Book Library MARBL Emory University Video Presentations William G Thomas Angle Chair in the Humanities and Professor of History University of Nebraska Lincoln Video Anne Cong Huyen Digital Scholar Whittier College Video Angel Nieves Associate Professor of Africana Studies Hamilton College Video Jessica Johnson Assistant Professor Department of History Michigan State University Video Upcoming Meetings and Other Events View the Academy calendar of upcoming meetings and events Friday Forum Schedule View the 2015

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?i=21720 (2016-02-13)
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