archive-org.com » ORG » A » AMACAD.ORG

Total: 1374

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Teaching and the Digital Humanities: Symposium at Emory University - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    and Presuppositions of Scholarly Inquiry the Spring 1980 issue of our quarterly journal Dædalus Until today that conference was the Academy s most significant activity in the city of Atlanta Later this afternoon the American Academy s Lincoln Project will be meeting across campus The Lincoln Project is examining ways to preserve and strengthen our nation s public research universities at a time when government support has been shrinking I want to thank all of the project participants and guests who are with us this morning especially our cochairs Mary Sue Coleman President Emerita of the University of Michigan and Robert Birgeneau Chancellor Emeritus of the University of California Berkeley As some of you may know the Academy was founded in 1780 during the American Revolution by John Adams James Bowdoin John Hancock and other leaders who helped establish the new nation The Academy s founders believed that a strong republic must be grounded in open discourse engaged scholarship and an informed and active citizenry Over time the Academy has expanded to include leaders in all fields and disciplines many of whom work together through the Academy to address topics both of timely and abiding concern The first Academy Fellow to be elected from the state of Georgia was Atticus Greene Haygood a name that may be familiar to many of you Haygood was president of Emory from 1875 to 1884 His inspirational words Let us stand by what is good and make it better if we can are etched above the Haywood Hopkins Gate that welcomes students and visitors to this campus I believe they are a perfect epigram for our program this morning Humanities education properly understood is our attempt to transmit what is good from one generation to the next And the digital revolution has offered us new ways to make humanities education better more accessible and more interactive Like Haywood we should be cautious in our optimism about the digital future not every innovation is an improvement or comes without unintended consequences We should make things better if we can But I think we can and I know that we will hear some ideas this morning that will justify my optimism This morning s program is inspired by the work of the Academy s Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences which was formed in response to a bipartisan call from U S Senators Lamar Alexander and Mark Warner and Representatives Tom Petri and David Price to assess the state of humanistic and social scientific scholarship and education The Commission was cochaired by Duke University president Richard Brodhead and John Rowe retired chairman of Exelon Corporation It released its influential report The Heart of the Matter in 2013 Among its many recommendations The Heart of the Matter suggested several ways to broaden public and scholarly access to digital resources including revised fair use and copyright regulations and it encouraged new partnerships to ensure that all students have access to quality online teaching materials especially those in

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22010 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Lincoln Project Regional Forum: Georgia - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    and happiness of a free independent and virtuous people Since our founding groups of Fellows have come together through the Academy to examine some of the most pressing challenges of their times The first Academy Fellow to be elected from the state of Georgia was Atticus Greene Haygood president of Emory from 1875 to 1884 A Methodist minister he offered several robust defenses of public education throughout the 1880s often stating No man in his senses believes ignorance to be a good thing for him no man not too ignorant to think and not too mean to care believes ignorance to be a good thing for his children One fundamental debate of Haygood s era focused on the need for state support in primary education But Haygood as Emory s president was a transitional figure in the evolution of the university as well He believed that higher education was an important resource for people of all backgrounds For this reason he convinced Emory s Trustees to create a program for technical training in the industrial crafts to help prepare Georgians for new economic opportunities At the same time he broadened Emory s curricula to include new courses in languages music and theology and instituted higher standards for the bachelor s degree Haygood s belief in the public s responsibility to support education in the practical potential of a college degree and in the value of a well rounded curriculum for personal development all anticipate the concerns of the American Academy s Lincoln Project The Lincoln Project is named for Abraham Lincoln to commemorate his role in signing the Morrill Act in 1862 which created the nation s public university system Its goal is to preserve and strengthen these critical institutions at a time when they are threatened by diminishing public

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22011 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Bellagio Conference: The Knowledge Ecosystem - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    thought a lot about how foundations can stimulate and sustain individual creativity and curiosity driven research MacArthur is well known for its so called genius grants offering 500 000 over five years with no strings attached to exceptionally creative and productive individuals But the foundation did much more which I will share with you in a moment The American Academy s work is deeply concerned about the future of scholarly knowledge as made particularly clear in Restoring the Foundation our report on science and technology research policy I read with particular interest the papers of Wilhelm Krull Secretary General of the Volkswagen Foundation and Bernhard Lorentz former President and CEO of Stiftung Mercator exploring what it takes to establish a culture of creativity and the role of foundations in the production of scholarly knowledge The American Academy s concerns resonate with Wilhelm s observation that in almost all of Europe we currently too often pursue a we don t trust you we know better and we want results now kind of approach which extinguishes small flames of creativity and certainly prevents them from turning into strong fires of transformative research and scientific innovation Introducing a panel discussion on the Academy s Restoring the Foundation at Duke a couple of weeks ago I quoted Nobel Laureate and Academy Fellow Robert Lefkowitz who remarked just last year There s a current problem in biomedical research The emphasis is on doing things which are not risky To have a grant proposal funded you have to propose something and then present what is called preliminary data which is basically evidence that you ve already done what you re proposing to do If there s any risk involved then your proposal won t be funded Bernhard speaks to that issue explaining that private foundations have more than ever the duty to do things differently than the publicly financed grant making system He continues Foundations can trust in a return of their investment without being accountable for this They don t need to narrow down their investments to a standardized set of reporting or results And yet they can trust in an excellent return Because that s what foundations have always been good at identifying outstanding individuals and giving them liberty to achieve results in their own pace and their own methods My argument is that this strength remains indispensable and is even more needed for scholarly knowledge as a public good in a globalized world With that said I think it is a legitimate worry that many private foundations at least in the United States have become overly concerned with impact and short term measurable results At MacArthur I tried to strike a balance setting measurable goals in fields like global conservation or affordable housing in the United States but also putting aside funds for new initiatives like the development of the field of law and neuroscience And we invested in building research institutions through large unrestricted grants to places like the Carnegie Endowment for

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22012&t=4&s= (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Friday Forum: Charles Simic - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    Password Forgot your password Friday Forum Charles Simic On March 6 2015 poet and translator Charles Simic discussed the craft of poetry and translation at the American Academy Following the presentation he signed copies of his collected works New and Selected Poems 1962 2012 An excerpt from the introductory remarks of Dr Fanton follow below We are delighted that Charles Simic one of our nation s most distinguished poets is able to join us today Professor emeritus of American literature and creative writing at the University of New Hampshire he was also our nation s fifteenth Poet Laureate from 2007 to 2008 He was elected to the American Academy in 2002 and won a MacArthur Genius Award in 1984 The first poet elected to the Academy or at least the first Fellow to burnish his reputation through his published poetry was John Trumbull elected in 1791 Trumbull was educated at Yale and began practicing law in John Adams s Boston office before and during the Revolution In later years he became a member of the literary fraternity known as the Hartford Wits a group that included David Humphreys Joel Barlow and Lemuel Hopkins Together the Hartford Wits published a mock epic called The Anarchiad in 1786 and 1787 In twenty four books The Anarchiad expressed the poets loathing for the Articles of Confederation and their desire for a stronger central government The poem begins with the following dark image of America in the immediate aftermath of the Revolution In visions fair the scenes of fate unroll And Massachusetts opens on my soul There Chaos Anarch old asserts his sway And mobs in myriads blacken all the way Twenty four books later it ends in similar sentiment Virtue no more the generous breast shall fire Nor radiant truth the historic page

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22013 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 40 Years of Evolution - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    and International Affairs American Institutions and the Public Good Publications Overview Dædalus Journal of the Academy Bulletin Magazine of the Academy Books Research Papers Monographs and Project Publications Meetings Overview Induction 2015 Upcoming Meetings and Events Friday Forum 2015 2016 Schedule Past Meetings and Events Fellowships Overview Visiting Scholars Program Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy Policy Fellowship in the Humanities Education and the Arts Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password Home 40 Years of Evolution 40 Years of Evolution House of the Academy March 5 2015 Welcome Jonathan F Fanton President American Academy of Arts and Sciences Video Introduction Jonathan B Losos Monique and Philip Lehner Professor for the Study of Latin America Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Curator in Herpetology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology Harvard University Video Presentations Peter R Grant Class of 1877 Professor of Zoology Emeritus Princeton University Video B Rosemary Grant Emeritus Professor and Senior Research Biologist in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Princeton University Video Upcoming Meetings and Other Events View the Academy calendar of upcoming meetings and events Friday Forum Schedule View the 2015

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?i=21693 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 2019th Stated Meeting: Forty Years of Evolution - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    try to make it a regular feature for our meetings and add additional cities So I am delighted to report that this evening s program is now live in three locations In addition to Cambridge we are being joined by Academy members and their guests gathered at the New York and Chicago offices of the law firm Skadden Arps Slate Meagher Flom Greetings from Cambridge to our friends and colleagues in both cities All three audiences will enjoy the presentations and panel discussion here in Cambridge Following the formal remarks while the panel here is fielding questions from the audience the New York and Chicago audiences will engage in their own discussions In Chicago the conversation will be moderated by Trevor Price Professor of Biology in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at the University of Chicago Dr Price is a leading expert on bird evolution ecology and conservation In New York the conversation will be led by Jonathan Weiner the Maxwell M Geffen Professor of Medical and Scientific Journalism at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism Among his many honors is a 1995 Pulitzer Prize for his book The Beak of the Finch A Story of Evolution in Our Time We are grateful that such distinguished experts have agreed to participate in this evening s program And once again I want to thank Academy Fellow Mark Kaplan for suggesting that we live stream our events to groups across the country and for facilitating our use of the conference spaces at Skadden Arps Tonight our featured speakers are Peter and Rosemary Grant a remarkable team whose research provides compelling demonstrable evidence of evolution in action in the Galápagos finches For 40 years they have examined the beauty and wonder of change over time and their research has been seminal in numerous fields of study including evolution ecology and population biology Moreover their work continues to inspire new generations of young researchers who seek to understand what Darwin once called the mystery of mysteries As many of you know the American Academy has been an important venue for discussions of scientific discoveries as well as debates about the meanings of controversial theories Perhaps the most important of these debates began in January 1860 when biologist Louis Agassiz and botanist Asa Gray initiated the famous conversations that helped to introduce Darwin s theory of evolution in the United States But in fact the Academy s interest in the natural history of birds preceded the Agassiz Gray debates by several decades In 1783 we received a letter about the winter habits of house swallows from Samuel Dexter a minister in Dedham Massachusetts He would be elected to the American Academy in 1791 Dexter s letter begins Among more important branches of natural history with which you are conversant ornithology cannot have escaped your notice I know it has been a problem among naturalists whether certain species of birds emigrate in autumn to distant countries and return in the spring or remain with us

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22014 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Mr g – The Story of Creation as Told by God - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    Education Science Engineering and Technology Global Security and International Affairs American Institutions and the Public Good Publications Overview Dædalus Journal of the Academy Bulletin Magazine of the Academy Books Research Papers Monographs and Project Publications Meetings Overview Induction 2015 Upcoming Meetings and Events Friday Forum 2015 2016 Schedule Past Meetings and Events Fellowships Overview Visiting Scholars Program Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy Policy Fellowship in the Humanities Education and the Arts Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password Mr g The Story of Creation as Told by God House of the Academy February 11 2015 Welcome Jonathan F Fanton President American Academy of Arts and Sciences Video Introduction Alan Lightman Professor of the Practice of the Humanities Massachusetts Institute of Technology Video Presentations Alan Lightman Professor of the Practice of the Humanities Massachusetts Institute of Technology Video Lisa Sowle Cahill J Donald Monan Professor Boston College Video Edward J Hall Norman E Vuilleumier Professor of Philosophy Harvard University Video Upcoming Meetings and Other Events View the Academy calendar of upcoming meetings and events Friday Forum Schedule View the 2015 2016 Friday Forum schedule Past Meetings Lectures

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?i=21676 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 2017th Stated Meeting: Mr. g - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    tried and failed to build a nuclear bomb during World War II and Sila in which a group of characters on Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic confront a rapidly changing environment The text for this evening s reading and discussion Mr g is an adaptation of a novel of the same name by Academy Fellow Alan Lightman Professor Lightman was the first MIT professor to receive a joint appointment in the sciences and the humanities For much of his professional life he has written about the ethical and social implications of contemporary science often for the general public In his interdisciplinary public facing approach to complicated subjects like quantum mechanics and the fragility of memory Professor Lightman preserves the tradition of engaged scholarship upon which this Academy was founded In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries the American Academy served as a convenient venue for the discussion of scientific discoveries as well as debates about the meanings of controversial theories Our historical Proceedings now available on JSTOR lists hundreds of such debates Perhaps the most important began in January 1860 when biologist Louis Agassiz and botanist Asa Gray initiated the famous conversations that helped introduce Darwin s theory of evolution in the United States But the origin of species was not the Academy s only concern at that time While Agassiz and Gray were developing their arguments Academy Fellows were also examining meteorites studying gorilla musculature and directing public attention to instances of spontaneous combustion of saw dust used to catch the dripping of oil from machinery But a common thread in all of the Academy meetings of the early 1860s a time of sectional conflict but also a time of scientific conflict was an intense focus on natural history and geology as a means of evaluating Darwin s theories and reevaluating our own place in the universe Agassiz a great scientist and a leading critic of evolutionary theory once remarked It must be for truth s sake and not for the sake of its usefulness to humanity that the scientific man studies Nature The application of science to the useful arts requires other abilities other qualities other tools than his The practical man stands ever ready to take up the work where the scientific man leaves it and adapt it to the material wants and uses of daily life Today as in Agassiz s time the Academy is a place where scientific men or we should say scientific people can come together with practical people to discuss the meaning of new ideas and to transcend the distance between the laboratory and daily life In recent years we have been studying not just the public s understanding of scientists but scientists understanding of the public For example our ongoing project on the Alternative Energy Future examines how social legal and economic factors can inhibit the adoption of new energy technologies The project recommends ways to include new and better social scientific research into discussions of energy policy The U S

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content.aspx?d=22015 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  •