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  • Teaching and the Digital Humanities - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    embedded in the digital humanities have in many ways relegated digital humanities to two centers at most research institutions the English and history departments For scholars like me who have leveraged the expertise and political capital of their peers to build a home for digital humanities it s also very clear that in order to remain at the cutting edge of the field we must situate ourselves also in the interdisciplinary fields of Africana studies women s and gender studies as well as American studies I can already see parallels between what Svensson has argued in his piece with the radical transformations that many of us helped to bring about in academia in the 1980s and 1990s and even well before that The margins area studies identity studies interdisciplinary studies have become more central to standard practice with the advent of the digital humanities I am currently codirecting an Andrew W Mellon Foundation funded initiative to jump start the digital humanities at Hamilton College We have also received support from the Office of Digital Humanities at the NEH to institutionalize digital scholarship research and teaching at Hamilton The Digital Humanities Initiative DHI is a research and teaching collaboration in which new media and computing technologies are used to promote humanities based research scholarship and teaching including curriculum development across the liberal arts My partnership with Janet Simons from Library and Information Technology Services LITS was the first between a faculty member and an administrator to cut across multiple units namely ITS the dean of faculty and the library We work to unite faculty research goals with technology and library science resources to build upon Hamilton s significant strength in teaching and research We also work to emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of humanities research incorporating undergraduate students as scholarly partners in significant original research projects TheDHI has helped to create and develop a new humanities environment at Hamilton one in which faculty research projects enrich the undergraduate experience through collaborative investigation in the pursuit of understanding and querying our cultural heritage The DHI s technology infrastructure and research support models are designed to be innovative and sustainable This approach reduces for example the need for regular revamping of static faculty research web pages by creating mechanisms that maintain research outcomes as living web presences showcasing faculty and student collaborative scholarship The DHI has developed an institutional repository for digital collections whose scalability and extreme flexibility in the manner in which objects can be accessed in the long term has helped define industry best practices Our collections software also offers flexibility for the creation and maintenance of the relationships between objects and across digital collections Metadata schemas for digital collections are developed in collaboration with faculty research directors and students to promote the richest possible exploration and discovery for digital scholarship We re all getting our hands dirty with metadata and we love it None of these multiyear collaborations would have been possible without two of our core curricular efforts first the creation of an undergraduate minor in cinema and media studies and second through our comprehensive undergraduate research program entitled CLASS the effort to remove the confines of the semester schedule to promote students deep understanding of digital humanities research within a specific field over the long term In these experiences students and the faculty advisor become part of a collaborative working team of experts in the DHI CLASS provides students with training in digital literacies through intensive research and scholarship coupled with unique internship experiences In the summer between sophomore and junior years CLASS offers undergraduate students an intensive professional development experience and provides a comprehensive overview of work in their respective fields Assistance with job placement in a professional field based on their CLASS internship is an important feature of their final year at Hamilton My own work in South Africa has largely looked at the ways in which we might begin to engage with 3D historical reconstructions and has promoted efforts to reclaim social justice narratives of the apartheid era This effort would not have been possible had it not been for the work that we have been doing with students to visualize and create 3D environments and models We are developing a platform through which we can embed primary archival materials in a 3D world to recreate scenes from the apartheid era so that students can engage with lost or hidden history that tourism in South Africa has since displaced Through the DHI the prospect of twenty first century interdisciplinarity may well be made real and the promise of a new renaissance scholar with mastery in many disciplines may become increasingly commonplace Jessica Marie Johnson Jessica Marie Johnson is Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Michigan State University I teach African American history at Michigan State University a research institution with a digital humanities center and laboratory Digital humanities digital tools and working in digital radical or new media is significantly reshaping how faculty engage with students just as the technology is reshaping how students engage with faculty Whether asking undergraduates to work with online databases and materials similar to Emory s Transatlantic Slave Trade Database to blog their reflections on and analyses of primary source texts or to participate in conversations online via Twitter Facebook or a range of other social media platforms faculty and teachers everywhere have a new range of tools for exposing students to new material and introducing them to new ways of thinking about the world As a historian both of New Orleans and of slavery and the African diaspora I am especially interested in ways digital tools encourage students to see the past from a nonlinear perspective I encourage students to see the past from the perspectives of slaves and I ve found there is a fundamental difference in how students approach their research via the written page and how they present their research via screen and code Let me explain As opposed to a lecture that encourages students to digest and evaluate information presented to them digital tools can provide students with a cornucopia of informational choices Students may find themselves exploring an assigned website and researching a digital exhibit or they may find themselves having discussions about the class with me or with other students on Facebook As a teacher I have less control over what they encounter than I ever did before because of the depth and breadth of information available online and the kind of conversations that are already happening there I may send them down any number of research paths but these are not definitive linear journeys Students can take control of the research process for themselves and ask interesting new questions that we would not have imagined before The interface itself a website a database the computer itself raises questions for all ranges of history whether the topic is slavery or histories of race gender sexuality American studies ethnic studies Africana studies and women s studies programs can have a special role to play for digital humanities projects Digital histories of slavery indeed all histories of slavery have been haunted by a struggle over the role slavery should play in how we understand society it is a tension that is felt in different ways through all places touched by the Atlantic slave trade It often comes down to a contest between those struggling to center histories of bondage in national narratives and narratives of international injustice and those who disagree that slavery played a pivotal role in shaping the world that we know For example using Tumblr which is a bit like a cross between Twitter and Facebook students can have conversations with each other they might not have had with a professor And they can have conversations with the screen that they might not have had with me They can also meet and interact with social media users in the real world which can make the material being discussed much more real for them One of the challenges that I find when using digital humanities or social media in the classroom is an assumption that students and faculty are well versed in technology when that is often not the case Students have ranges of skills that vary depending on the kind of institution where they study and the topics they choose to study Many faculty members assume that students want to learn with technology when they often do not And sometimes students do not want to critically engage with academic issues on Facebook or Twitter or Tumblr for some students those sites represent their leisure time and they would prefer not to blur the boundaries of work and play But other students many of whom are themselves training to become teachers are particularly interested in how digital tools work About twenty students in the College of Education at Michigan State who also participate in the History of Education program took a course I designed for their research methods and skills requirement in it they learned how to approach for example a history of slavery through new digital and social media I created a Tumblr site for their discussions where they could follow along with each other and reply and talk to each other online They could then bring these experiences with them to class and experiment with how to introduce these online concepts and methods into elementary and high school classrooms Further social media sites frequently serve as gateways to more specifically purpose driven digital tools for example my class s interaction Tumblr encouraged one student to create a WordPress site The student Kristen Roberts used a digital archive of Missouri Supreme Court records between 1830 and 1860 to document cases of resistance by enslaved women and then built a timeline of the cases using a digital tool called TimeMapper In other words learning how to use digital media can become an exercise that moves a student across platforms like Tumblr to WordPress to TimeMapper to still greater digital skills and deeper historical understanding Stephen G Nichols Stephen G Nichols is the James M Beall Professor Emeritus of French and Humanities at Johns Hopkins University He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy in 2013 The digital humanities are patently exciting to those who are involved with them What I see as a problem is how many of our colleagues are not involved in them how many do not even begin to understand why they should be involved with them And it is not necessarily that they think they have to have some degree from MIT in order to get involved but they think it will be too much work given the kind of preparation they do for their teaching and their research they have a lot of deadlines so why add to the list But at the same time they frequently justify their resistance by arguing The digital humanities do not get students involved it is all too passive This panel however has shown that we in fact seek student producers not consumers of digital materials And we can make use of digital resources to enable students to become producers that is the nature of engagement As others have mentioned through digital resources students could become involved in a historical set of issues in a nonlinear way We tend to want to present narratives from the beginning with a middle and end a very good Aristotelian narrative But as we now know from our reading of contemporary fiction the notion of a neat narrative that begins and develops and then ends satisfactorily has gone by the wayside We are used to nonlinearity in our lives in our books and film and in our social media but we have not introduced this to our teaching How do we capture the attention of contemporary students as they sit in the classroom tweeting Further faculty frequently express concern over how they ought to approach the traditional issue of credentialing how to judge academic nonlinearity expressed through digital media Faculty have not yet sensed the seismic shift that has already taken place in the evaluation of the work of digital humanists G Wayne Clough G Wayne Clough is former Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution and President Emeritus of the Georgia Institute of Technology He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy in 2010 I am a passionate supporter of access to higher education and to learning resources and this applies to resources whether they are found on a university campus in an archive in a library or in a museum Their assets should be available so all people can benefit but we live in a time when access is at risk of being diminished because of rising costs and inadequate attention to reaching underserved audiences This is of concern for reasons related to equality but also to our democratic process that requires an informed electorate Fortunately digital technology is a tool that will allow us redress the issues we face When I brought the concept of digital learning and digitization to the Smithsonian I hit a wall fairly quickly with some who thought I was merely talking about people having unlimited access to the collections and using them for purposes that might be seen as frivolous Personally I don t think there is anything wrong with people having a bit of fun but our curators questioned how rigor and informed investigation which Stephen made an excellent point about would be built into the use of digital resources There is no question that if we want to optimize the value in using digital resources we need to build a context for them beyond simple images on a page There has to be a structure that allows for discovery and growth if we are to make optimal use of the digital technologies that are pervading our lives Will spoke about encouraging critical thinking something our students today too often lack This has to be part and parcel of the basis for the use of the new approaches to learning This speaks to a role for mentors and teachers who will always be needed even in the digital world Angel used the words sustainability and can do attitudes I think those are very much on target if you are going to get into the digital enterprise you cannot think of this as a one time or short term initiative These tools are here to stay and will only become more important to the future We have to build a framework that will allow us to take advantage of social and historical currency Current events for example natural disasters such as Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Katrina can help connect what is happening today with the relevant historical precedent and help expand the depth of the process of discovery Anne talked about how digital technology is going to reshape pedagogical approaches I like that phrase Too often in an attempt to get attention the word associated with changes related to use of digital technology is transformative This word is overused and exaggerates what can and will be done But reshap e a better and more accurate word goes much further in thinking about encouraging engagement There is an opportunity here for institutions not only to improve learning for traditional students but also to engage close in groups like alumni as well as to reach a wide array of nontraditional learners In the case of museums only 15 percent of people who are called minorities go to museums so what is the future of museums with demographic change Digital approaches that could complement traditional exhibitions can be designed to reach groups who might not consider coming in person I get the opportunity to lecture at a number of universities and I often request a separate meeting with students with no faculty present One of the questions I ask them is how much technology they are using in their classrooms I am surprised by how often they say that while there is a lot of talk about technology there is very little real action Despite all of the interesting possibilities it appears that digital technology has not yet penetrated very far into the traditional classroom Will talked about the growing importance of teaching and learning resource centers I fully agree If we are to really penetrate the market it is critical that we offer resources and support to faculty who want to change To return to the point that Stephen made about the humanities leading in the use of ditigal learning technologies I agree this is the case The humanities present a clearer picture for the average person of how digital technology serves the purpose of research and encourages engagement than does astrophysics say in utilizing digital technology to explain the discovery of the latest exoplanet It is easier for most people to achieve understanding through history and shared human experiences as provided by the humanities than it is through examples in the sciences or in engineering I would also like to mention my belief that the growing use of digital technologies will break down the long standing barriers that have been built up between learning institutions Here I am referring to universities museums libraries and archives Just because resources of such institutions are typically housed in different buildings and are separated by different cultures this does not mean it has to remain this way in the future Once digital resources are housed in the cloud users will not care too much about the source In using digital technologies the future will belong to those who see the value in collaboration When I first came to the Smithsonian I found there was a lack of collaboration not only within the institution itself but also between the Smithsonian and other institutions and universities We set out with a new strategic plan to change this and have made considerable progress I am convinced that the national resources found at places like the

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content/publications/pubContent.aspx?d=21923 (2016-02-13)
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  • On Legal Services for the Poor - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    formed a blue ribbon task force that issued a 2011 report outlining steps to ensure that LSC reaches this goal 1 This restructuring has enabled LSC to confront more effectively the enduring challenge to us and the legal aid community namely limited resources to address the vast and growing national need In 1976 our first year of full congressional funding when 12 percent of the U S population was eligible for LSC funded legal assistance the fledgling LSC was allocated in inflation adjusted terms more than 468 million Three years later Congress increased funding to an all time high of what today would be more than 880 million I wish I could say we were anywhere near that level of funding now but despite our best efforts the FY2015 allocation of 375 million is less than half of that peak and is only 10 million more than the previous year Even ten years ago LSC s actual funding was 400 million Since 1969 when LSC funding began to decline the population eligible for LSC funded assistance has grown to an all time high Nearly one in three Americans 96 million people qualified for LSC funded services at some time during 2013 the most recent year for which U S Census Bureau data are available According to the data 63 6 million people one in five Americans had annual incomes below the threshold for LSC funded legal assistance of 125 percent of the federal poverty line 14 363 for an individual and 29 438 for a family of four Another 32 4 million people had incomes below the 125 percent level for at least two consecutive months during the year To stretch limited resources LSC has encouraged the expansion of pro bono services from the private bar In August 2011 at Harvard Law School LSC convened a national Pro Bono Task Force of more than sixty leaders of the legal community and later that year released its report and recommendations on how to increase the number of lawyers willing to do pro bono work and how to better match the available talent pool with the large unmet need 2 With help from others in the profession such as the American Bar Association ABA Access to Justice ATJ Commissions and local bars LSC has implemented many of the recommendations detailed in the report One of those recommendations the creation of a Pro Bono Innovation Fund to award competitive grants supporting innovative pro bono projects throughout the country was funded by Congress for FY2014 and was increased to 4 million in FY2015 Developing new technology and better uses of existing technology is another way to stretch limited resources and LSC continues to be a leader in this effort through its extraordinary Technology Initiative Grants TIG program which this year celebrates its fifteenth anniversary Through this program LSC has funded 525 tech projects with a total of more than 40 million In its FY2015 budget Congress increased funding for the TIG program by 550

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  • Causes of Campus Calm: Scaling China's Ivory Tower - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    techniques include mental health screening and military training as well as formal and informal instruction in political ideology moral values and Chinese history and culture Dissemination of officially approved messages is not confined to the classroom social media are used extensively and often unobtrusively as a means to communicate the party line A dense network of guidance counselors fudaoyuan trained personnel tasked with keeping close tabs on their student charges to ensure that their beliefs and behaviors do not violate approved boundaries forms a mainstay of the control regimen at PRC universities Typically advanced graduate students and young instructors in their late twenties or early thirties the counselors assisted by student informants report to the deputy party secretaries responsible for student work at all levels of the university structure The guidance counselors also help mobilize students to participate in various voluntary associations often under the direct or indirect auspices of the Communist Party or Youth League which deliver a range of social services including eldercare for senior citizens and education for migrant children The result of this associational activism is to relieve the state of some of its onerous welfare burden while at the same time providing an outlet for student engagement that is supportive rather than subversive of the political system Ironically among the most powerful weapons in the PRC s arsenal of control mechanisms is the promotion of a battery of assessment measures by no means unique to China that are internationally recognized as standard metrics for any globally competitive system of higher education At the core of these evaluation procedures is a fixation with scaling or quantifiable ratings of quality that pervade and pervert both official and unofficial criteria of scholarly excellence A driving motivation behind China s contemporary higher education reforms first unveiled in 1998 has been the effort to catapult the country s leading universities into the upper echelons of world class universities as reflected in the Times Higher Education Shanghai Jiaotong QS and other rankings of top research universities in the world The PRC has pumped enormous amounts of funding into this endeavor via centrally mandated programs such as Project 211 initiated in 1995 and Project 985 1998 To protect its generous financial investment the state has also imposed an elaborate system of evaluation and compensation consciously tailored to the benchmarks of the world university rankings that serves to structure and constrain the activities and attitudes of Chinese academics Bibliometrics the counting of articles published in SCI Scientific Citation Index and SSCI Social Science Citation Index journals has become the gold standard for measuring China s progress in scaling the ivory tower As a component of this strategic ascent armies of postdoctoral fellows have been hired by all of China s major universities These young scholars often with considerable overseas research and study experience have no teaching duties and are employed on short term contracts renewable upon producing a specified quota of SCI or SSCI journal articles Faculty members are also rewarded with generous

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  • Philologia Rediviva? - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    s greatest philological laboratory to which I have devoted myself for over forty years seems almost on the verge of shutting down It is now conceivable that within a few generations the number of people able to make sense of texts in many of India s almost two dozen premodern languages which together constitute the world s longest continuous multilingual textual history will have approached a statistical zero In short we may well be standing on the verge of a historic event the inauguration of a world without philology for the first time in three thousand years In response to these developments but at the same time recognizing the opportunities that challenges offer scholars across the globe have begun to take action Five years ago in Berlin a number of young scholars from across the geographical and historical spectrum initiated a project called Zukunftsphilologie future philology aimed at rejuvenating the field with new research programs postdoctoral fellowships and workshops held in the Arab world Africa and South Asia In 2008 a conference organized by scholars at the Institute for History and Philology at Academia Sinica Taipei gave rise to World Philology Harvard University Press 2015 the first book to chart the global history of the field Fellowship programs such as The Learned Practices of Canonical Texts at the Max Plank Institute founded by Academy Fellow Anthony Grafton have been initiated conferences have been held and scheduled for the future including The Languages of the Past and the Future of Ancient Studies at the University of Pennsylvania this October influential new books have been published including Philology The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities Princeton University Press 2014 by James Turner and new journals such as Philological Encounters and Philology An International Journal on the Evolution of Languages Cultures and Texts have been founded while older journals such as Gerschichte der Germanistik have been updated to account for recent global developments Further Harvard University Press has inaugurated several notable multilanguage book series including the I Tatti Renaissance Library Latin 2001 the Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library Byzantine Greek Medieval Latin and Old English 2010 and the Murty Classical Library of India at present fourteen different languages in nine different scripts 2014 New York University Press meanwhile launched the Clay Sanskrit Library 2005 and the Library of Arabic Literature 2012 There is now even talk at the international level of forming a World Philology Association If such efforts are to be sustained philologists must develop a new disciplinary formation with a new intellectual core For as defined here philology unlike philosophy and mathematics has never had a disciplinary home in which its real capacities could develop If it did achieve some measure of institutional dominance in the nineteenth century European university this was because of the veneration then paid to the study of the classics Philology s fall from grace in the course of the twentieth century was caused in part by the classics loss of centrality but even more from the proliferation

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  • Shinto Festivals and Bricolage - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    The festival begins on a boat in Tokyo Bay from which participants draw seawater it continues with the polishing of mirrors symbolizing the Kami deities of the shrine a procession of gaily caparisoned horses making symbolic offerings to the imperial court more horses galloping through a tree lined arcade in town at night and many other displays of music dance and feats of strength It culminates in a great procession on May 5 The festival s purpose is to effect the rebirth of the Kami The Kami are carried in darkness to look upon them would be blinding in eight palanquins called mikoshi in a procession involving hundreds of bearers and attendants back to the tabisho Marking where the Kami first manifested the tabisho is a large fenced vermillion enclosure at a crossroads several hundred meters from the shrine s main gate Dozens of men pull huge drums each large enough for several people to stand on to clear the way for the mikoshi The mikoshi each weigh more than one ton and are carried on long poles atop the bearers shoulders Each bearer thinks the direction he or she is facing is front so the mikoshi whirls in the shrine yard in repeated assaults on the narrow gate through which it must pass to join the procession Drums await the mikoshi on the other side calling them with incessant booms The erotic symbolism is liberally fuelled with alcohol heat noise and the bearers calls of Hoissa Hoissa Under fresh cut bamboo canopies in the tabisho the Kami receive elaborate offerings of food music and prayers of praise Remaining in this parturition pavilion until morning they emerge reborn Their joyous human children convey them back to the shrine where they are solemnly installed to bless and protect Fuchu for another year A mikoshi in the Darkness Festival Before the town s suburbanization no one publicly disputed the all night carousing cross dressing brawls and transgressive sexual encounters that assisted the rebirth of the Kami But contemporary Japan more conservatively prioritizes school and the workweek and has limited patience for rowdy shrine festivals and the attendant disruption especially on a school night After a string of complaints the local PTA forced the shrine to adopt a daytime festival schedule in 1962 The daytime schedule eviscerated the festival s rationale and made nonsense of its copious use of distinctively shaped decorative lanterns The costumes and ritual gear lovingly preserved across generations presumed a nighttime format yet they could hardly be abandoned even if their use made no sense in daylight Enter the shrine s high priest Sawatari Masamori who was appointed in 1999 Determined to restore darkness to the festival he worked to establish for himself a position of respect and trust in Fuchu allying with the mayor and other city officials and eventually rising to head the local PTA By 2002 he had secured the town s agreement to restore the traditional nighttime format Head priest Sawatari s bricolage utilized the

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  • Noteworthy - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    the 2015 recipient of the Catherine Wolfe Bruce Gold Medal given by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Robert L Nussbaum University of California San Francisco received the 2015 Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education He shares the award with Huntington Willard Marine Biological Laboratory and Roderick R McInnes McGill University Roberta Cooper Ramo Modrall Sperling received the inaugural Award for Professional Excellence from the Harvard Law School Center on the Legal Profession She also received the ABA Medal from the American Bar Association Robert D Reischauer Urban Institute received a 2015 Harvard Medal from the Harvard Alumni Association Mark J Roe Harvard Law School received the 2015 Allen Overy Working Paper Prize from the European Corporate Governance Institute Helmut Schwarz Technische Universität Berlin Alexander von Humboldt Foundation received the ENI Foundation Award for 2015 for New Frontiers of Hydrocarbon Research Laurence Senelick Tufts University has been named a Fellow of the Center for Advanced Studies Ludwig Maximilians Universität München Germany Diana Wall Colorado State University has been awarded the U lysses Medal from the University College of Dublin Christopher Wheeldon London United Kingdom received the 2015 Tony Award for Best Choreography for An American in Paris Huntington Willard Marine Biological Laboratory received the 2015 Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education He shares the award with Robert L Nussbaum University of California San Francisco and Roderick R McInnes McGill University Chi huey Wong Scripps Research Institute Academia Sinica is the recipient of the 2015 Robert Robinson Award for Contributions to the Advancement of Organic Chemistry given by the Royal Society of Chemistry New Appointments Mary Beckerle University of Utah has been appointed to the Board of Directors of Johnson Johnson William J Burns Carnegie Endowment for International Peace has been appointed Senior Advisor to Blackstone Jonathan Epstein University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine has been named Executive Vice Dean and Chief Scientific Officer for Penn Medicine Paula T Hammond Massachusetts Institute of Technology has been named the head of the Department of Chemical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Charles O Holliday Jr Bank of America has been appointed Chairman of Royal Dutch Shell plc Talmadge E King Jr University of California San Francisco School of Medicine has been appointed Dean of the School of Medicine and Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs at the University of California San Francisco Robert Kirshner The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation has been named Chief Program Officer for Science at the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Reynold Levy Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts has been elected to the Board of Directors of the National Book Foundation Jane McAuliffe Library of Congress has been named Director of National and International Outreach at the Library of Congress Maurice Obstfeld University of California Berkeley has been appointed as the economic counselor and director of the International Monetary Fund s Research Department Ariel Pakes Harvard University has been appointed Senior Advisor to Cornerstone Research Henri Termeer Genzyme has been named a key advisor

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  • In Memoriam: John David Steinbruner (1941–2015) - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    The Cybernetic Theory of Decision not long after completing his doctorate at MIT He became an Assistant Professor of Government at Harvard in 1969 served as Associate Professor of Public Policy at the John F Kennedy School of Government at Harvard from 1973 to 1976 and then was granted tenure at Yale and was an Associate Professor in the School of Organization and Management and in the Department of Political Science He left that position in 1978 to become the Director of the Foreign Policy Studies Program at the Brookings Institution all before he turned 40 From 1996 until his death he was Professor of Public Policy at the School of Public Policy at the University of Maryland and Director of the Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland He was a brilliant scholar and widely published author whose multidisciplinary expertise spanned from climate change to biological weapons to civil discord and nuclear operations He served on influential advisory committees including the Pentagon s Defense Policy Board and guided innumerable studies for the National Academy of Sciences the intelligence community and other government agencies He inspired two individuals who each went on to become the Secretary of Defense of the United States and who joined him in articulating innovative precepts for post Cold War security that became the underpinning for decades of U S Russian nuclear cooperation And he was a highly successful institution builder widely respected by foundation leaders for his intellectual clarity and near prophetic understanding of twenty first century global security trends John was a deeply private man who led a hugely public life Even people who thought they knew him well have expressed astonishment at the range and diversity of individuals who considered him their intellectual and spiritual anchor His friends were many and varied a Supreme Court justice a Benedictine abbot prominent Russian scientists a group of Catholic Bishops twelve of whom travelled to Qom under his guidance in 2014 to talk to Iranian clerics about nuclear security and many dozens of senior policy makers from around the world But his circle somehow always included younger people just starting their careers whom he took under his wing and mentored generously Those of us who were lucky enough to fall into his orbit will always feel an incalculable debt not just for his help in transforming our inchoate ideas into refined research concepts and then tactfully pretending that this was what we had always meant to say he was famous for that but for instilling a sense of values and higher purpose that we might never have had the courage to espouse without his encouragement John s success granted him access to the highest levels of academia and policy making but for him this was never the goal He genuinely believed in the perfectibility of human beings and of society if only given the right tools and opportunity John had known for a decade that he had an incurable disease He endured repeated episodes of

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  • Remembrance - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    S Carroll June 14 2015 elected in 2003 William Owen Chadwick July 17 2015 elected in 1977 Mark Correa June 16 2015 elected in 1993 Martha Ann Derthick January 12 2015 elected in 1982 E L Doctorow July 21 2015 elected in 1991 Russell J Donnelly June 13 2015 elected in 2001 Allison J Doupe October 24 2014 elected in 2008 George W Downs January 21 2015 elected in 2014 Maurice Duverger December 16 2014 elected in 1962 James Alan Fay June 2 2015 elected in 1962 David B Frohnmayer March 9 2015 elected in 2002 Peter Jack Gay May 12 2015 elected in 1967 John H Gibbons July 17 2015 elected in 2005 Gunter Grass April 13 2015 elected in 1970 Albert Henry Halsey October 14 2014 elected in 1988 Benjamin Harshav April 23 2015 elected in 1995 Theodore Martin Hesburgh February 26 2015 elected in 1960 Louis Norberg Howard June 28 2015 elected in 1965 Donald Raymond Keough February 24 2015 elected in 2002 B B King May 14 2015 elected in 2008 Robert Paul Kraft May 26 2015 elected in 1974 Stephen Martin Krane January 19 2015 elected in 1983 Benjamin Lax April 21 2015 elected in 1962 Norman B Leventhal April 5 2015 elected in 2007 Philip Levine February 14 2015 elected in 2002 Henry Linschitz November 24 2014 elected in 1967 John Leask Lumley May 30 2015 elected in 1975 Mary Frances Lyon December 25 2014 elected in 1980 Albert Harry Maysles March 5 2015 elected in 2013 Daniel J Meltzer May 24 2015 elected in 2004 Yoichiro Nambu July 5 2015 elected in 1973 John Forbes Nash Jr May 23 2015 elected in 1995 Norman H Nie April 2 2015 elected in 2009 Richard John O Connell April 2 2015 elected in 2007 James

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