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  • Chinese Art and Authenticity - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    Upcoming Meetings and Events Friday Forum 2015 2016 Schedule Past Meetings and Events Fellowships Overview Visiting Scholars Program Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy Policy Fellowship in the Humanities Education and the Arts Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password Chinese Art and Authenticity 1843rd Stated Meeting and Regional Induction Ceremony San Francisco Speaker James Cahill University of California Berkeley Commentator Jerome Silbergeld University of Washington March 3 2001 The Academy s 1843rd Stated Meeting Chinese Art and Authenticity was presented by one of the world s leading experts in Asian Art James Cahill From 1965 until his retirement in 1994 Cahill was Professor of the History of Art at the University of California Berkeley and Curator of Asian Art University Art Museum In 1995 the College Art Association awarded him its Lifetime Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award Cahill s early work dealt with the theory and practice of scholar amateur painting in China subsequently he published the first coherent and detailed account of Chinese painting from the 14th through the 17th century His five lecture series at Harvard Columbia and the University of Kansas have resulted in publications including The Compelling Image Nature and Style in 17th Century Chinese Painting and The Painters Practice How Artists Lived and Worked in Traditional China His most recent Getty Lectures at the University of Southern California are being prepared for publication under the title The Flower and the Mirror Representations of Women in Late Chinese Painting Commentator Jerome Silbergeld has taught Chinese art history at the University of Washington for twenty five years and is the author of Chinese Painting Style and Chinese Painting Colors His other books include studies of 20th century Chinese artists the contemporary Chinese

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content/events/events.aspx?d=730&t=4&s=0 (2016-02-13)
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  • The New Economy and Racial Inequality - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    Induction 2015 Upcoming Meetings and Events Friday Forum 2015 2016 Schedule Past Meetings and Events Fellowships Overview Visiting Scholars Program Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy Policy Fellowship in the Humanities Education and the Arts Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password The New Economy and Racial Inequality 1842nd Stated Meeting Cambridge William Julius Wilson Harvard University February 14 2001 William Julius Wilson In a talk focusing on the period since 1945 William Julius Wilson related the issues of race and inequality including racial and ethnic antagonisms to the changing American economy He also considered the implications of this discussion for addressing issues of race through public policy Mr Wilson s research addresses the impact of inequality and poverty on racial and ethnic relations urban poverty family structure and joblessness as well as the role of public policies in both alleviating and exacerbating these problems He is the author of The Declining Significance of Race Blacks and Changing American Institutions winner of the American Sociological Association s Sydney Spivak Award The Truly Disadvantaged The Inner City the Underclass and Public Policy When Work Disappears The World of the New Urban Poor and most recently The Bridge over the Racial Divide Rising Inequality and Coalition Politics Past president of the American Sociological Association a MacArthur Prize Fellow and a recipient of the National Medal of Science Wilson has been a member of many national boards and commissions including the President s Commission on White House Fellowships the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences the Russell Sage Foundation and the National Humanities Center He is currently director of the Joblessness and Urban Poverty Research Program at Harvard s John F Kennedy School of Government Read the transcript

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content/events/events.aspx?i=731 (2016-02-13)
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  • Census 2000 and the Fuzzy Boundary Separating Politics and Sciences - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password Census 2000 and the Fuzzy Boundary Separating Politics and Sciences 1841st Stated Meeting Cambridge Kenneth Prewitt US Census Bureau Jan 10 2001 The story of Census 2000 starts in 1789 when a decennial census was constitutionally established for political purposes The story gathers momentum in the 1950s with the systematic measurement of the differential undercount is joined to the politics of race in the 1960s and by 1980 finds that census methodology is increasingly the stuff of party line votes and litigation Census 2000 has become a case study of a scientific project that is politically neutral in its intent and implementation but not in its consequences Under these conditions there are some important and perhaps counter intuitive principles that can ensure the best science possible while still meeting political responsibilities Kenneth Prewitt has been Director of the United States Census Bureau since October 21 1998 Nominated by the President he was unanimously confirmed by the US Senate For ten years he was Senior Vice President of the Rockefeller Foundation where he directed the international science based development program involving activities in Asia

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content/events/events.aspx?d=732&t=4&s=0 (2016-02-13)
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  • Gender and Inequality: Old Answers, New Questions - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password Gender and Inequality Old Answers New Questions 1840th Stated Meeting Cambridge Linda Kerber University of Iowa and Robert Post Law School University of California Berkeley December 6 2000 Linda Kerber Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of Husbands Abigail Adams pleaded in 1776 The wife of founding father and Academy cofounder John Adams warned that all Men would be tyrants if they could However according to award winning historian Linda Kerber the founding fathers chose instead to retain the old laws governing domestic relations thereby codifying gender inequality and helping to shape male female relations for the next two hundred years Only in the past generation have feminist influenced modifications to the legal system helped spur radical changes in gender relations In her talk at the Academy s 1840th Stated Meeting Professor Kerber argued that American law will continue to play a central role in male female relations in the future on such issues as domestic violence childcare and the structure of work the feminization of poverty and international human rights The University of Iowa historian drew on her pathbreaking research in constitutional and legal history to show that choices we make in American law strongly influence gender relations In her talk she took a fresh look at some old questions about gender inequality What s fair What counts as equal treatment of men and women Answers to these questions have changed radically within a single generation A half century ago none of the following were considered unfair excusing all or virtually all women from jury service excluding women from many forms of work education and training assigning only to men the authority to exercise violence in the name of the

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content/events/events.aspx?d=733&t=4&s=0 (2016-02-13)
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  • Growing Inequality: It's Good for the Rich, But Is It Bad for the Poor? - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    single parent have hardly changed during these years By contrast the fraction of women who have become single parents in the least educated group has grown enormously As wages spread out and family structure changes simultaneously the two become mutually reinforcing with long term implications including fewer opportunities for the children In the mass of data one conclusion is clear A mother at the highest educational level is more likely to be in a two parent family and more likely to have a higher income At no time has it been more important to choose your parents particularly your mother wisely Christopher Jencks Whereas David has talked about changes in the distribution of individual earnings I will focus on changes in the distribution of household income which reflect the distribution of both individual earnings and retirement income as well as the ways individuals sort themselves into households Census data on the distribution of household income between 1967 and 1998 reveal that since 1980 the rich have become a lot better off the middle class has become a little better off and the poor have become no worse off In conventional economic analysis if some people gain and nobody loses the population as a whole has gained Is this conclusion correct Or do changes in richer people s incomes generate what economists like to call externalities that affect the welfare of poorer people whose purchasing power has not changed If other people get richer and I do not how does that affect me In sociology the standard answer is that other people s incomes matter because their consumption level affects my subjective assessment of my needs If most teenagers start buying Nike sneakers instead of Converses my teenager will feel worse off if he cannot buy Nikes and I will feel worse off because I can no longer buy him what he needs to feel comfortable at school It s a short step from there to the idea that when other people get richer my objective needs may also change When almost everyone can afford a car public transportation decays so those who cannot afford a car have more trouble getting around Such externalities are real but they are not the ones I want to discuss in this talk Instead I want to focus on some other mechanisms by which the gains of the rich seem to influence what happens to those whose incomes do not change Education First I want to compare the educational attainments of students whose parents are in the top and bottom quartiles of the income distribution If incomes rise at the top and stagnate at the bottom what should we expect to see In the simplest account we expect the children of the rich to gain while the children of the less affluent don t change much In a more complex version we would expect that since rising inequality means that the payoff to college is rising parents and students at all income levels would invest more in schooling and educational attainment would rise for everyone However if those at the bottom have trouble financing higher education we might not expect their children to change as much as more affluent children When we compare high school graduates in the early 1980s before the big jump in inequality with those who graduated in the early 1990s after the big jump we see that college attendance rose a lot among the more affluent a little among middle income families and hardly at all among the poorest families These findings imply that the poor are worse off only if you think that schooling is a positional good whose value depends not on how much you have but on how much you have relative to others with whom you are competing Most of the available evidence fails to support the positional interpretation of the payoff to schooling so one cannot argue that the poor were worse off in 1992 than in 1982 Now I want to ask a different question Do other people s incomes affect a child s educational prospects independent of the child s own family income One way to consider this is to compare American states Over the past thirty years inequality has grown far more in some states than in others Whenever economic inequality grows the increase can take two distinct forms neighborhoods can become more internally heterogeneous with bigger income gaps between neighbors or people who get richer can move to better neighborhoods leaving the distribution of income in their old neighborhoods pretty much unchanged In investigating this issue Susan Mayer of the University of Chicago has found that while income inequality increased between 1970 and 1990 almost all of the increase took the form of greater inequality among not within neighborhoods This has important substantive implications If people mainly compare themselves with their neighbors they are not going to see themselves as falling farther behind because the big winners in the economic lottery will have moved elsewhere Of course people also compare themselves with others outside their neighborhood but the most important vehicle for such comparisons is probably television which has always projected a vision of how Americans live that is far beyond the means of low income families What are the effects of growing residential segregation by income First it leads to increasing disparities in school quality not only because the tax base for local support is more unequal but also even more important because the strongest single determinant of where able teachers choose to work is the socioeconomic mix of the students they will be teaching The student mix is a far more powerful factor than salaries so even when districts with a large proportion of poor children pay a little more than nearby districts as they often do they cannot compete successfully for the best teachers Although there are no data linking the growth of economic inequality to disparities in students test performance Mayer has examined the impact of inequality on

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content/publications/pubContent.aspx?d=446 (2016-02-13)
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  • Toward Global Justice - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    and Events Friday Forum 2015 2016 Schedule Past Meetings and Events Fellowships Overview Visiting Scholars Program Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy Policy Fellowship in the Humanities Education and the Arts Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password Toward Global Justice 1838th Stated Meeting Chicago Martha Nussbaum October 28 2000 At the Fall Stated Meeting of the Midwest Center Martha Nussbaum spoke on the topic Toward Global Justice Ms Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago where she holds appointments in the Law School the Divinity School and the Department of Philosophy Her publications include Cultivating Humanity A Classical Defense of Radical Reform in Higher Education Sex and Social Justice The Fragility of Goodness Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy and most recently Women and Human Development The Capabilities Approach The 1838th Stated Meeting of the Academy the event was held at the Chicago Cultural Center a landmark building that is home to the world s largest Tiffany dome The meeting included a private viewing of the Museum of Broadcast Communications and a regional induction

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content/events/events.aspx?i=734 (2016-02-13)
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  • The ICC and US National Security - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password The ICC and US National Security CISS Conference American University s Washington College of Law Washington DC September 14 2000 Program 9 30 Welcome Carl Kaysen Co Chair CISS American Academy of Arts and Sciences Claudio Grossman Dean Washington College of Law 9 45 Panel I The ICC International Law and Violent Conflict When Do Rules Matter Carl Kaysen Chair Relationship of ICC to Use of Force Leila Nadya Sadat Washington University School of Law St Louis ICC and the Future of the International Legal System Anne Marie Slaughter Harvard Law School The Case for Creating an International Judicial Deterrent Kenneth Roth Human Rights Watch Setting a Precedent Evaluating the Political Effectiveness of the Yugoslav Tribunal Paul Williams American University Washington College of Law 11 15 Panel II Does Strengthening the International Rule of Law Help or Hinder the United States in its Pursuit of National Security Chair Sarah Sewall Carr Center for Human Rights Harvard Univ Key Elements of the Court and U S Concerns Bart Brown Chicago Kent Law School Improving the Definitions of War Crimes Long Run Ramifications for US National Security Lt Colonel Bill Lietzau U S Marine Corps The ICC and the Deployment of US Armed Forces TBA Why the ICC is a Threat to US Interest Edwin Williamson Sullivan and Cromwell Implications of Remaining Outside the ICC Regime Michael Scharf New England School of Law 1 00 Lunch The Evolution of Administration Policy Toward the ICC David Scheffer US Ambassador at Large for War Crimes Issues 2 30 Panel III How Would the ICC Affect the Conduct of American Justice Chair Madeline Morris Duke University Law School The ICC and the Constitution Lee Casey Baker

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content/events/events.aspx?d=736&t=4&s=0 (2016-02-13)
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  • Theater and Society: The Poison Tree - American Academy of Arts & Sciences
    Project Publications Meetings Overview Induction 2015 Upcoming Meetings and Events Friday Forum 2015 2016 Schedule Past Meetings and Events Fellowships Overview Visiting Scholars Program Hellman Fellowship in Science and Technology Policy Policy Fellowship in the Humanities Education and the Arts Policy Fellowship in Global Security and International Affairs The Exploratory Fund Member Login User Name Password Forgot your password Theater and Society The Poison Tree 1836th Stated Meeting Los Angeles Gordon Davidson Robert Egan Robert Glaudini July 15 2000 The 1836th Stated Meeting of the Academy was held in Los Angeles California Academy member Gordon Davidson producer director of the Performing Arts Center of Los Angeles County made it possible for Academy members and guests to attend a matinee production of Robert Glaudini s The Poison Tree at the Mark Taper Forum Following the performance the meeting continued at the Salvatori Room of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion where Gordon Davidson talked about his own experiences in the dramatic arts He introduced his colleagues Robert Egan producing director of the Mark Taper Forum and Robert Glaudini author of The Poison Tree and all participated in an informal dialogue with the Fellows about the play and the many aspects of theater production

    Original URL path: https://www.amacad.org/content/events/events.aspx?i=552 (2016-02-13)
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