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  • FILM: Films by and about Native women, and about the movement of Native peoples across the Americas are among those to screen at 2011 Native American Film + Video Festival  | American Indian News Service
    Asphalt by director Pedro Daniel López Tzotzil It features four Native people from the Mexican state of Chiapas who have moved to the city of San Cristóbal de las Casas to attend school and their reactions to the prejudice they face as indigenous youth Others include Kissed by Lightening the debut film by Shelley Niro who is Mohawk and co produced by Annie Frazier Henry who is Blackfoot and Sioux The 2009 film is inspired by an ancient Iroquois story about an artist who in grief immerses herself in her painting only to realize that she has to let go and move on The film is set in the contemporary on the Six Nations Reserve in Ontario Reel Injun On the Trail of the Hollywood Indian by Cree filmmaker Neil Diamond documents the portrayal of North American Natives in a century of cinema Another the horror film File under Miscellaneous by Jeff Barnaby who is Mi gMaq is about a Mi gMaq man who wants to be white For more information about the 2011 Film Video Festival visit www nativenetworks si edu eng blue nafvf 11 html By Kara Briggs American Indian News Service Download this article as a Word document Comments are closed Search the news Search for Recent Articles FILM Films by and about Native women and about the movement of Native peoples across the Americas are among those to screen at 2011 Native American Film Video Festival PEOPLE Native filmmakers use eye experience to winnow entries for Film Video Festival CULTURE Through art dance language Boxleys breathe new life into Tsimshian culture HISTORY Family is foundation of documentary on NYC s Mohawk ironworker community MUSEUM Three elders a century of inspiration More News FILM Films by and about Native women and about the movement of Native peoples across the Americas are among those to screen at 2011 Native American Film Video Festival New York The 2011 Native American Film Video Festival at PEOPLE Native filmmakers use eye experience to winnow entries for Film Video Festival New York Every other year the Film Video Festival at CULTURE Through art dance language Boxleys breathe new life into Tsimshian culture Kingston Wash David Boxley is putting designs in red paint on HISTORY Family is foundation of documentary on NYC s Mohawk ironworker community New York Reaghan Tarbell never set out to be a New MUSEUM Three elders a century of inspiration When Maria Hinton was born in 1910 every Oneida family MUSIC Power source behind Link Wray s chords his family Link Wray and his Ray Men broke into American pop Search Past Articles Search Past Articles Select Month January 2011 December 2010 October 2010 August 2010 June 2010 April 2010 February 2010 December 2009 November 2009 October 2009 September 2009 July 2009 Tags alaska All Nations Skate Jam art arts Avatar black whaling captain boarding schools Chappaquiddick Band of the Wampanoag Nation chocolate conservation culture education essays exhibition featured Fritz Scholder Gabrielle Tayac Hawai ian history Hopi identity language

    Original URL path: http://www.americanindiannews.org/2011/01/film-festival/ (2016-02-18)
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  • MUSIC: Power source behind Link Wray’s chords: his family | American Indian News Service
    around with things They were able to set up a portable four trac and begin recording in the kitchen at home Briggs The Wray brothers started sending out demos The record labels weren t all very good One they used never distributed their records and made them pay for the privilege of having the records pressed This is a story that could only be told in the post war era when national affluence and large young populations of consumers contributed to a booming recording industry Wray The Wray brothers were trying to play things more popish like Patti Page and the Chordettes The record industry recognized only country music and that whole generic pop thing They came to D C My dad hired an agent Link and Doug were in the hospital in 1956 with TB Dad s agent was in one club and my dad was singing at another club In those days they sent out talent scouts The scout came into the club and sat down on the bar stool next to Dad s agent who told him you have to go hear Vernon Wray Vernon signed with Cameo Records in Philadelphia which had also signed Andy Williams and Pat Boone Vernon asked if he could have his brothers play with him Link got a medical pass to get out of the hospital to go play on the session They were so impressed with Link that they decided they decided to get Archie Bleyer of Cadence to hear Link Archie Bleyer came down to Fredericksburg Virginia to listen to Link and stayed the whole evening at a record hop But he hated the studio version of Rumble until his daughter heard it and said it reminded her of West Side Story They release it as Oddball Briggs Rumble is released in 1958 Link was 28 years old and Vernon 33 but the record company s promotional department made them younger Rumble was the game changer that among other things brought Link to the front of the band Wray I rely on what my dad said He was an amazing historian He said it got airplay but not in every city In Boston the DJ took it off the record player and broke it and said It will never get played on this station again But the next week it did because it was climbing the Billboard chart Gang activity was a big deal people were afraid but that wasn t what they the Wrays were doing They were just trying to be innovative with their sound Briggs Other things were changing in music that would change the dynamics of this literal band of brothers Wray No one got filthy rich back then even though the money was nice the touring was nice They still played the club circuit around D C They all performed and all sang The record companies were working with all of them The record company reversed my dad s name from Vernon Wray to Ray Vernon My dad s record career was still going But he understood supply and demand There was Perry Como Pat Boone Andy Williams and Bing Crosby There were so many guys singing in the pop venue He moved into a businessman position and let his contract go and opened a recording studio After Rumble they would release Link Wray and the Ray Men s Rawhide in 1959 and Jack the Ripper in 1961 Briggs Link Wray s sound was one part his innovative guitar playing but it was also the recording and the backup notably by your uncle Doug on the drums for all of the hits Wray There was a ton of musical talent that came shooting out in the late 1950s but the engineering from those big studios was you get what you get My father was a genius as a recording engineer All you have to do is listen to anything Link Wray and then listen to the recording by the other early rock instrumentalists When you listen to Link Wray music there is a top middle and bottom My dad did all manner of things to get the kind of sound out of things that he wanted I can remember the first time I saw him pull the front off a bass drum and stuff it full of blankets I am almost positive Link invented the power chord because I can remember all the experimenting they did Briggs Rock music is full of outsized egos A lot of family bands eventually split because of all kinds of differences But the Wray brothers never did Wray They fought more about the creative process they didn t fight about not liking and loving each other They would argue over I want to do it this way and then they would do it Briggs So what happened as music changed in the 1960s Wray In the early 1960s their releases did great regionally and they were touring like mad doing television and playing the college circuit But when the Beatles came it got tough They kept playing and working together In 1969 they did an album Yesterday Today They did old hits on one side and new songs like Genocide Genocide s very ominous sounding and would later be used in this year s Ray Liotta movie called Street Kings of Motor City Briggs The whole folk rock genre took hold in 1970 But there was still a fan base for Link Wray and his Ray Men had by now established a fan base internationally Wray There was a small house in back of our house as a joke my dad spray painted on it Wray s Shack 3 Tracks and moved the studio into it In 1971 Polydor issued Link Wray recorded at the Shack and engineered by my Dad and re established him as a viable musician and brought the Wray family back again into the popular music scene On the album cover was Link s

    Original URL path: http://www.americanindiannews.org/2011/01/music-link-wray/ (2016-02-18)
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  • MUSEUM: “Infinity of Nations” reveals true spectrum of Native America | American Indian News Service
    own people Courtesy of the Smithsonian s National Museum of the American Indian An Inuit parka is a featured objected in the National Museum of the American Indian s Infinity of Nations exhibition at the museum in New York A colorfully beaded and fringed Inuit woman s parka called a tuilli ca 1890 1925 shows the innovation that occurred in styles of clothing after contact with whalers in the central Canadian Arctic but also through the creativity of one Inuit woman Nearly 160 000 beads were used to decorate this parka including a beaded panel from an earlier tuilli It has big roomy shoulders so the wearer can lay her nursing baby flat with feet in either shoulder Some objects are included for their historic significance They include Tecumseh s pipe tomahawk presented to him in 1812 a year before he died in battle by British Colonel Henry Proctor Also woven wool garters that likely belonged to Osceola the Seminole leader whom George Catlin painted wearing these or similar garters and the silk satin and lace wedding dress worn by Susette La Flesche an Omaha woman who advocated for the release of imprisoned Ponca leaders including Standing Bear Tim Johnson associate director for museum programs called the work that generated this exhibition a world leading experience Five years ago we set out on a course to establish an exhibition practice and methodology that projected the full power beauty and meaning of American Indian expression while strengthening the purpose substance and veracity of Native interpretation of a collection largely assembled by George Gustav Heye said Johnson who is Mohawk Infinity of Nations will be a permanent exhibition at the museum in New York though over time some pieces will be exchanged for others The volume Infinity of Nations Art and History in the Collections of the National Museum of the American Indian 29 99 HarperCollins is a coffee table book filled with essays by exhibition curators and advisers Parts of the exhibition can be viewed online at www nmai si edu exhibitions infinityofnations By Kara Briggs American Indian News Service Download this article as a Word document The collector behind most of objects in the Infinity of Nations exhibition American Indian News Service George Gustav Heye 1874 1957 was the wealthy industrialist who amassed most of this 825 000 item collection buying and funding anthropologists to collect objects from Tierra del Fuego to the Arctic When he died Heye owned the largest private collection of American Indian arts and artifacts in the world It was housed for decades at the Museum of the American Indian at Broadway and 155 th Street in Manhattan In those cramped quarters objects were crowded together and yet visitors including generations of New York schoolchildren came to the museum because of the wonder of its collection It was acquired in 1989 by the Smithsonian Institution for the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington D C with the promise that the museum would always maintain

    Original URL path: http://www.americanindiannews.org/2010/12/infinity-of-nations/ (2016-02-18)
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  • MUSIC: Bill Miller’s List of 10 Essential Songs for Native Musicians  | American Indian News Service
    the white man to eat his dinner or how long it takes the sun to go between two lodge poles 6 Geronimo s Cadillac by Michael Martin Murphey Miller met Michael Martin Murphey in the early 1970s while Miller was attending the Layton School of Art in Milwaukee and Murphey was touring following his 1972 hit Geronimo s Cadillac Murphey was impressed with Miller s musicianship and booked Miller as his opening act Miller later did a definitive cover of the song in Spirit Songs Best of Bill Miller 6 Ballad of Ira Hayes by Peter LaFarge The song would go gold on Bitter Tears the risky American Indian themed album by Johnny Cash that put Peter LaFarge on the map LaFarge Narragansett wrote about Ira Hayes the Pima Marine who helped to raise the flag at Iwo Jima but died of alcoholism after the war Miller reflects Then people wrote and sang about Indians out of pure honor and love More than people in the New Age did They the New Agers were people without understanding putting Native flute on tracks but no Native musicians With this music Cash made a statement 7 Four Strong Winds by Ian Tyson Miller pauses for minute then sings Four strong winds that blow lonely seven seas that run high all the things that don t change come what may He said That s prayer music prayer to the song roots music from the land Folk songs story songs around a campfire you just play it from the heart the way Floyd Westerman used to do You don t need anything else Four Strong Winds was a hit for Tyson and his wife Sylvia in 1964 In Tyson s career as a cowboy singer over the past 25 years Miller has joined him onstage a time or two 8 Ohio by Neil Young It immediately came out after the National Guard shooting at Kent State Miller said The shooting left four students dead Four decades later it demonstrates the power of a song to raise awareness and inform people about what happened It is he said relevant for American Indians who have the potential to write music about a variety of injustices both historic and contemporary 9 Free Man in Paris by Joni Mitchell Miller loves this song about a man feeling the weight of responsibility and longing for escape He likes the complexity of the story the beat and the melody It s a kind of complexity that he feels is lacking in a lot of contemporary music He said It s about getting a depth layering it in tapping in like Frank Sinatra singing over an orchestra The Beatles would layer stuff on top more instruments not more machines Beauty and spirit these are the concepts of art that need to revive to get to the interior to get to the hearts 10 What the World Needs Now by Jackie DeShannon Miller mentioned the 1969 classic as his personal antidote against

    Original URL path: http://www.americanindiannews.org/2010/12/10-essential-songs-for-native-musicians/ (2016-02-18)
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  • LANGUAGE: Treasured teacher embodies 100 reasons to learn Oneida | American Indian News Service
    many grandparents and great grandparents of Oneida families participated the dictionary grew to 34 000 words When it was published in 1996 there were between 25 and 30 Oneida speakers living though many would pass away in the next few years including Christjohn Hinton continued working Maria was one of the people who noticed that when people came to her and tried out their Oneida their pronunciation was often terrible Abbott said I pointed out to her that the only way to prevent that was if they had a model and we started the project of her recording the entire dictionary Courtesy of the University of Wisconsin Green Bay Elder language teacher Maria Hinton recorded the Oneida Dictionary with help from the University of Wisconsin Green Bay Her recordings available online will help future generations learn how to properly pronounce the Oneida language The dictionary in Hinton s voice can be heard on the University of Wisconsin Green Bay website here The database is searchable with English words Hill said Hinton s gift is being a teacher to generations of Oneida learners The woman has an infinite acceptance of people trying to acquire the language Hill said She is a quiet woman but very expressive She has a lovely motherly way of generating trust and gaining acceptance She brings the trust level down to where you are Thompson said what Oneida students long for today is to be able to hear two Oneida speakers flow in conversation together But with less than a handful of first language speakers left at the Oneida Nation in Wisconsin there are fewer opportunities Thompson said she persists in her own efforts because the Oneida language makes my heart feel good Hinton who personally received her Prism Award from the National Museum of the American Indian at the National Indian Education Association in Milwaukee last fall is still talking about the high school students who spoke Oneida and sang and danced in her honor She remembers thinking Everything around us is Oneida By Kara Briggs American Indian News Service Download this article as a Word document Comments are closed Search the news Search for Recent Articles FILM Films by and about Native women and about the movement of Native peoples across the Americas are among those to screen at 2011 Native American Film Video Festival PEOPLE Native filmmakers use eye experience to winnow entries for Film Video Festival CULTURE Through art dance language Boxleys breathe new life into Tsimshian culture HISTORY Family is foundation of documentary on NYC s Mohawk ironworker community MUSEUM Three elders a century of inspiration More News FILM Films by and about Native women and about the movement of Native peoples across the Americas are among those to screen at 2011 Native American Film Video Festival New York The 2011 Native American Film Video Festival at PEOPLE Native filmmakers use eye experience to winnow entries for Film Video Festival New York Every other year the Film Video Festival at CULTURE Through

    Original URL path: http://www.americanindiannews.org/2010/06/treasured-teacher-embodies-100-reasons-to-learn-oneida/ (2016-02-18)
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  • CULTURE: Through art, dance, language, Boxleys breathe new life into Tsimshian culture | American Indian News Service
    a talking stick for which he carved an American eagle and a Russian bear embracing for the Goodwill Games U S President George H W Bush and Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev wrote messages of goodwill and inserted them in the carving s hollow David Robert followed quickly in his father s footsteps selling two pieces for 150 each when he was 7 years old and achieving his first gallery show when he was 15 His first totem commission followed at La Push Wash I have a clear memory of being 6 years old and learning how to run adze along a straight line then seeing how chopped up the wood was Now I can run a pencil line straight down the board Boxley nods appreciating how his sons have been able to live a life entirely in Tsimshian and never having to be on the outside looking in He said The best thing a parent can have is for their children to do more than they did I am proud of both my boys David Robert works now for Robert Davidson a widely respected Haida carver Boxley notes with pride that his son is a carver working for Davidson not an apprentice Boxley and David Robert co lead the dance troupe Git Hoan and before that they co led another group Tsimshian Haayuuk My dance group is well known for its masks At one time people were likening us to modern dancers but that wasn t true We are old style dancers Masks were used a lot in the old days by all the tribes The inspiration for the masks the box drums and the capes comes from the old materials that the Boxley family has found in museum collections such as the National Museum of the American Indian s Cultural Resources Center in Suitland Md Bringing out new materials made in the old style may have made the style seem new But David Robert said of visiting the Tsimshian objects in museum collections It s the only way to talk to the old people His father said He is taking it over after I hang it up Not too soon I hope David Robert replied One thing we feel strongly about is that the culture doesn t belong to us it belongs to everyone Boxley grinned at the bentwood box he d gone back to painting and said It s a big canoe that is what I say everyone can fit By Kara Briggs American Indian News Service Downlad this article as a Word Document Comments are closed Search the news Search for Recent Articles FILM Films by and about Native women and about the movement of Native peoples across the Americas are among those to screen at 2011 Native American Film Video Festival PEOPLE Native filmmakers use eye experience to winnow entries for Film Video Festival CULTURE Through art dance language Boxleys breathe new life into Tsimshian culture HISTORY Family is foundation of documentary on NYC s Mohawk

    Original URL path: http://www.americanindiannews.org/2011/01/culture-boxleys-breathe-new-life-into-tsimshian-culture/ (2016-02-18)
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  • CULTURE: Rights of Indigenous Peoples Gained International Attention, Support in 2010  | American Indian News Service
    white caps of the mountain ranges that surround that sea The sea is shown on most maps as the Puget Sound the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Strait of Georgia but last year the Coast Salish Gathering successfully added their name for the sea which is one ecosystem to the geographical place names in Washington and British Columbia The Coast Salish Gathering is a powerful example of how Native Nations can significantly impact environmental policy across international borders and across multiple jurisdictions to restore the health of their homeland and waterways said Megan Minoka Hill director of Harvard s Honoring Nations Program Photo by Percy Abrams of the Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse The Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse team assembled by New York Harbor with Oren Lyons 80 Faith Keeper Turtle Clan Onondaga Nation Lyons was also an All American goalkeeper who played on the 1957 national championship Syracuse University lacrosse team with NFL legend Jim Brown On July 17 2010 the Iroquois Nationals a lacrosse team made up of 23 players from the Haudenosaunee also known as the Iroquois Confederacy was not permitted to travel to the FIL World Lacrosse Championships in Great Britain on their traditional Haudenosaunee passports The Nationals had placed fourth in the 1998 2002 and 2006 World Lacrosse Championships traveling each time internationally on Haudenosaunee passports used by their people for decades Suddenly the sovereign status of the governments of Indian nations as indicated in passports flags and identity cards was made known to a world wide audience You are asking us to denounce our citizenship for a game Percy Abrams the Nationals executive director said last summer When you come back from the game guess what We have denounced our citizenship Is that what they would do Tim Johnson Mohawk associate director for museum programs at the Smithsonian s National Museum of the American Indian said What s difficult for the average American to understand and what kids don t get in their education is that these documents are each a symbol of functioning American Indian governments that meet regularly and govern all the time The Haudenosaunee Confederacy spanning land in both present day New York and Ontario is a formal government established a thousand years ago As such it is the oldest continually operating democracy in North America stated Oren Lyons Faith Keeper Turtle Clan of the Onondaga Nation on the lacrosse team s website The Iroquois Nationals Abrams said serve as a declaration of our status as a sovereign nation that exists on the North American continent which we call the Great Turtle Island By Kara Briggs American Indian News Service Download this article as a Word document Comments are closed Search the news Search for Recent Articles FILM Films by and about Native women and about the movement of Native peoples across the Americas are among those to screen at 2011 Native American Film Video Festival PEOPLE Native filmmakers use eye experience to winnow entries for Film Video Festival CULTURE Through art

    Original URL path: http://www.americanindiannews.org/2010/12/rights-of-indigenous-peoples/ (2016-02-18)
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  • PEOPLE: Helen Maynor Scheirbeck (1935-2010)  | American Indian News Service
    her long career Scheirbeck organized cultural festivals and powwows She curated museum exhibits conducted cultural symposia with traditional Indian leaders and scholars and organized arts and crafts cooperatives She encouraged and developed marketing outlets for Indian artists and craftsmen Helen s legacy lives on at the Smithsonian s National Museum of the American Indian said Howard Bass director of the Cultural Arts Program at the museum since 2002 She was an inspiring leader who mixed tough love and compassion She questioned everything and listened closely urging us to do our best to serve the interests of Indian Country and our visitors She knew that with hard work everything was possible What Scheirbeck most enjoyed was visiting Indian people and communities that she got to know through her decades of service In Alaska she slept on the floor of Head Start centers met with tribal leaders in their offices trying to solve one challenge or another and spent hours working with people to found a tribal school a Head Start program a relief effort for Indian families stranded by floods on the Navajo Nation and to help unrecognized tribes in Virginia and throughout the south become recognized She not only met the movers and shakers in Washington D C and in state capitals but she worked with everyday people building one program at a time to create Indian controlled institutions that improved the lives for all Indians Scheirbeck s family is planning a memorial service for a later time and will be establishing a scholarship fund in her name Established in 1989 through an Act of Congress the Smithsonian s National Museum of the American Indian is an institution of living cultures dedicated to advancing knowledge and understanding of the life languages literature history and arts of the Native peoples of the Western Hemisphere The museum includes the National Museum of the American Indian on the National Mall the George Gustav Heye Center a permanent exhibition and education facility in New York City and the Cultural Resources Center a research and collections facility in Suitland Md For more information about the museum visit www AmericanIndian si edu American Indian News Service Download this article as a Word document Comments are closed Search the news Search for Recent Articles FILM Films by and about Native women and about the movement of Native peoples across the Americas are among those to screen at 2011 Native American Film Video Festival PEOPLE Native filmmakers use eye experience to winnow entries for Film Video Festival CULTURE Through art dance language Boxleys breathe new life into Tsimshian culture HISTORY Family is foundation of documentary on NYC s Mohawk ironworker community MUSEUM Three elders a century of inspiration More News FILM Films by and about Native women and about the movement of Native peoples across the Americas are among those to screen at 2011 Native American Film Video Festival New York The 2011 Native American Film Video Festival at PEOPLE Native filmmakers use eye experience to winnow entries

    Original URL path: http://www.americanindiannews.org/2010/12/helen-maynor-scheirbeck/ (2016-02-18)
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