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  • Jude - Anabaptistwiki
    navigation search Home A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abbreviations Glossary 1 2 Peter Jude by Erland Waltner and J Daryl Charles Believers Church Bible Commentary This page under development J Daryl Charles Retrieved from http www anabaptistwiki org mediawiki index php title Jude oldid 15408 What links here Related

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  • Revelation - Anabaptistwiki
    Anabaptistwiki Jump to navigation search Home A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abbreviations Glossary Revelation by John R Yeatts Believers Church Bible Commentary This page under development John R Yeatts Retrieved from http www anabaptistwiki org mediawiki index php title Revelation oldid 15410 What links here Related changes Upload file

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  • Anabaptist Approaches to Scripture - Anabaptistwiki
    by Walter Klaassen 2 The Hermeneutics of the Anabaptists by John H Yoder 3 Hermeneutics and Discipleship by C J Dyck 4 The Hermeneutics of Obedience by Ben C Ollenburger 5 Menno Simons Encounter with the Bible by Henry Poettcker 6 Anabaptist Hermeneutics The Letter and the Spirit by William Klassen 7 The Relation of the Old and New Covenants in Pilgram Marpeck s Theology by William Klassen 8 The Bern Debate of 1538 Christ the Center of Scripture by Walter Klaassen Part II Historical Developments 9 The Pre eminence of the Bible in Mennonite History by Frits Kuiper 10 American Mennonites and the Bible by C Norman Kraus Part III Contemporary Hermeneutics Evaluative Responses and Proposals 11 Reflections on Biblical Hermeneutics by Millard Lind 12 Canon Creative Biblicism as a Hermeneutical Principle by Jacob J Enz 12 Modes of Appropriating the Bible by Waldemar Janzen 14 Journey to Emmaus A Study in Critical Methodology by George Brunk III 15 Criticism and Analogy in Historical Critical Interpretation Marlin E Miller 16 Beyond the Historical Critical Method by Willard M Swartley 17 The Authority of the Canon by John H Yoder Part IV The Bible in the Congregation 18 Teaching the

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  • Disciples and Discipleship (in John) - Anabaptistwiki
    6 60 66 and 21 2 Only Philip is called at the outset Follow me 1 43 for Peter see 21 19 others are transferred to Jesus by John and become disciples gathering around Jesus see TBC Gathering Disciples for 1 19 2 12 Some of these are introduced to Jesus by friends see commentary on 1 35 51 Nathanael 1 45 51 21 2 and the beloved disciple do not appear in the Synoptics The unnamed sons of Zebedee appear only in John 21 2 Commentators generally do not perceive discipleship as one of John s primary themes though Chennattu s Johannine Discipleship as a Covenant Relationship is a wonderful exception The essays by Segovia 1985 and Hillmer 1996 appear in volumes that address discipleship in the entire NT Both are helpful though Segovia excludes 13 31 35 and chapter 21 regarding them later additions Hillmer recognizes the importance of discipleship in John Discipleship involves both relationship with and abiding in Jesus It means following Jesus and keeping Jesus commandments especially loving one another Believing in and confessing Jesus encompass both relationship and action discipleship interacts with Christology 84 93 96 Chennattu rightly sees discipleship permeating John s entire narrative In John 1 35 51 the disciples are initiated into a process of following Jesus In chapters 2 4 the disciples are given various models of discipleship as Jesus reveals the presence of God In chapters 5 10 the disciples and characters in the story are provided with revelations of God in Jesus words and work and are confronted with choices for or against Jesus Chapters 11 12 heighten the urgency of decision and set the stage for Jesus hour 71 Her outline of Jesus farewell speech carries forward the discipleship theme 82 focusing particularly on the beloved disciple 100 201 She titles John 17 A Prayer Consecrating the Covenant Community of the Disciples 130 She also identifies Covenant Discipleship Motifs in John 20 21 emphasizing reclaiming in John 20 1 18 empowering in 20 19 31 and constituting the new covenant community in 21 to which she could add discipleship 140 79 Chennattu s contribution is particularly helpful for believers church communities of faith This commentary highlights discipleship at various places 1 35 51 13 31 35 and chap 21 Jesus teaching his disciples is prominent 4 27 38 6 1 21 60 71 In 7 2 3 Jesus brothers tell him to go to Judea so that your disciples also may see the works you are doing Jesus farewell addresses his disciples After Jesus resurrection he appears twice to the disciples 20 19 29 giving them the Great Commission and eliciting Thomas s confession The entire Gospel teaches true discipleship with the beloved disciple as model Bibliography edit Barnes Elizabeth The Story of Discipleship Christ Humanity and Church in Narrative Perspective Nashville Abingdon 1995 Chennattu Rekha M Johannine Discipleship as a Covenant Relationship Peabody Mass Hendrickson 2006 Dyck Cornelius J Hermeneutics and Discipleship In Essays on Biblical

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  • War and War Images (in Psalms) - Anabaptistwiki
    king to serve his purposes 2 Sam 10 6 19 11 1 14 25 1 Kings 4 20 28 10 26 11 40 The prophets considered the Lord to be king of the universe executing divine will through the practice of divine warfare Isa 6 11 13 Joel 2 1 11 Mic 1 2 4 Zeph 1 14 18 However their concern for justice led them to warn the Israelite ruling class and state apparatus against oppressing others Indeed Yahweh war could include the divine warrior attacking Israel itself through the armies of its enemies as judgment for the corruption in its own society Isa 5 20 30 63 10 Jer 9 7 11 Hos 9 1 5 6 Amos 2 4 8 Mic 1 1 7 The prophets associated the warfare of God with God s justice which would eventually abolish war and bring the reign of peace Isa 2 2 11 Jer 31 1 14 The Deuteronomistic history from the time of Josiah represented a reform movement It included teaching Yahweh war as God s demand that the nearby enemy with its idols and possessions be completely annihilated Deut 20 10 18 Josh 6 7 to protect the Israelites from learning abhorrent things This history emphasized God s demand for obedience to the law and rejection of idolatry 2 Kings 17 34 40 After the exile the concept of Yahweh war took the form of apocalyptic literature in which the appearance of the divine warrior was understood as someone leading an attack made up of heavenly forces which would destroy existing political institutions oppressing God s faithful people The result would be establishment of an unending divine government Dan 7 12 Rev 19 11 21 Millard Lind has traced the history and theology of Yahweh war from the exodus events to the sixth century BCE Lind contends that Israel s calling was to serve God in a nonviolent manner allowing itself to be led by the prophetic word and by God s own miraculous intervention He sees the increased participation of Israel in military conflict through the monarch as a falling away from God s command to establish a new and peaceful theopolitical society in the world based on obedience to God rather than on the use of military power Thus Yahweh war is not the endorsement of OT violence in the name of God but rather a restriction on warfare and violence It is God s command to Israel to hold back and let God deal with the enemies Ps 46 10 11 Lind 1971 1980 23 113 Janzen 1982 173 211 In psalms written to honor the rule of God and the Davidic king on Mt Zion the imagery of the divine warrior is prominent Pss 2 18 24 46 48 76 89 97 132 144 These poems depict the Lord as warrior who has vanquished primordial chaos and become king in the universe ruling on Zion and ensuring the failure of any natural or historical

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  • Wrath of God (in Isaiah) - Anabaptistwiki
    without such interference chap 36 Isaiah subverts this logic by rejecting the idea of different nations with tribal gods in favor of the Holy One of Israel who controls even foreign powers Nevertheless God s wrath does not have the last word in Isaiah Chapter 12 already points to a time in an undetermined future when the tables will be turned You will say on that day I will give thanks to you O LORD for though you were angry with me your anger turned away and you comforted me 12 1 emphasis added This statement reverses the repeated refrain identified previously and replaces it with a word of comfort on that day In effect Israel will go through a period of punishment discipline or even refinement but hope remains that comfort will eventually come Interestingly this progression is reflected in the structure of the book itself In the initial chapters comfort is in short supply but it becomes more prominent later indeed the two occurrences of this term in Isaiah 40 1 matches its number of appearances in the first 39 chapters of the book Isa 12 1 22 4 Isaiah 40 proclaims that the day has finally arrived the period of God s anger is over and a new day has come The people will experience a new exodus only this time from Babylon rather than Egypt Isa 43 God has not forsaken Israel and a remnant shall return to the land Discomfort with the idea of God s wrath sometimes prompts people to contrast the God of wrath of the OT with the God of love in the NT It is worth identifying two common misconceptions that give rise to such a view First while it is true that anger is often attributed to God in the Old Testament this is not the only or even the dominant perspective in these documents God s wrath often responds to human sin and injustice particularly in the context of God s covenant with Israel cf the Decalogue in Exod 20 1 17 and Deut 5 6 21 and many other expressions of the covenant in the law Blessings or curses are the consequences of obedience or disobedience to the law Deut 28 At the same time many passages qualify God s anger and place it within a broader perspective For instance the Lord s self description in Exodus 34 6 7 identifies God as slow to anger with steadfast love ḥesed extending to a thousand generations while punishment only lasts for three or four God s persistent care and merciful response to the people s cry despite their repeated rejection and rebellion proves central in Nehemiah 9 The book of Jonah extends God s mercy beyond Israel to concern for Nineveh the hated capital city of Assyria Against Jonah s explicit desire God accepts Nineveh s repentance and foregoes punishment In fact it is Jonah s knowledge of God s character as one who is merciful and slow to

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  • Guidelines for Writers - Anabaptistwiki
    for the average reader In most cases we encourage writers to keep articles shorter than those that appear in the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary AYBD In most cases 3000 to 5000 words should be about right Writers should employ subheads liberally to help guide the presentation More specific instructions regarding length may be assigned The intended audience is broad educated Christian believers of all traditions in settings across the world The target reading ability is first year college or its equivalent Technical terms should be explained or avoided Approach to the Bible edit The following characteristic emphases of 16th century Anabaptist approaches to the Bible is representative of the work of such scholars as John Howard Yoder and Stuart Murray Williams The Two Fold Word The Holy Spirit provides an inner word that brings the outer word to life in one s lived response The Rule of Paul Claims to special revelation must be tested by the larger body of believers the Bible is best read and interpreted in the congregation The Rule of Christ The promise of the Spirit s blessing is for the purpose of practical discernment for discipleship not for the apprehension of timeless truth Christocentrism All revelation biblical or otherwise must be understood in light of Christ and in light of following Christ The Priority of the New Testament Since the new covenant is superior to the now obsolete old covenant the New Testament is more authoritative than the Old Testament The editors of ADB reject this simplistic approach and believe that continuities as well as discontinuities among the texts of Scripture must be explored and respected even as we affirm the fullness of God s revelation in Christ The Epistemology of Obedience Obedience is not only the goal of reading the Bible it is also its prerequisite The Bible as Self Interpreting The Word is plain and needs no interpretation Menno Simons sometimes referred to as the perspicuity of Scripture This item also has serious flaws because it fails to appreciate the lenses by which readers and the reading community engage the text In writing for the ADB authors of articles are asked to eschew modernistic objectivism Biblicism The 16th century Anabaptists shared with both Catholics and Protestants an approach to the Bible sometimes called biblicism strict adherence to the letter of the Bible In their own day this doctrine was not controversial it was simply accepted The editors of ADB hold that this item is rightly abandoned by most contemporary Christians out of appreciation for the diversity of perspectives within the Bible and for the social and historical locatedness of the biblical texts Scripture Alone In contrast to the mother Church but in keeping with other Protestants the Anabaptists also held to the principle of sola scriptura the Bible alone is authoritative for discerning God s will tradition and ecclesiastic authorities are subject to the authority of the Bible The editors of ADB believe this item does not adequately appreciate the inevitable and even

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  • Paul M. Zehr - Anabaptistwiki
    Eastern Mennonite Seminary in 1965 Paul served as pastor at First Mennonite Church of St Petersburg Florida from 1965 to 1973 Following this eight year experience of pastoring an urban church he attended Princeton Theological Seminary where he earned a Th M in biblical studies in 1975 Paul then served as pastor at a small church and began teaching biblical and theological courses in the Lancaster Pennsylvania area His teaching ministry reached several in service pastors which led to his appointment as director of external programs for Easter Mennonite Seminary It also created within him a greater awareness of the person role and function of the pastor In 1980 Paul was ordained bishop and supervised pastors in five congregations a position he held for twenty five years In 1987 he graduated from Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary with a D Min A major part of this doctoral study was the preparation of a philosophy of Mennonite pastoral education and a curriculum guide for Mennonite conference based pastoral education For more than twenty years Paul worked in supervised pastoral education His interest in biblical studies continued in teaching classes and in chairing the editorial council for the Believers Church Bible Commentary series

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