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  • Anabaptist Dictionary of the Bible - Anabaptistwiki
    and Discipleship in John War and War Images in Psalms Wrath of God in Isaiah Guidelines for Writers Purpose of the Project The purpose of the online Anabaptist Dictionary of the Bible ADB is to reflect and to reflect critically on an Anabaptist approach to the reading of the Bible The Dictionary is intended to serve those in the Anabaptist traditions as well as to be a respectful conversation partner with those in other Christian traditions as authors give voice to an appreciatively critical Anabaptist perspective It is a Bible dictionary wiki project with an Anabaptist flavor Origin and Early History of the Project In 2007 the Editorial Council of the Believers Church Bible Commentary series discussed the advisability of developing an online Anabaptist Bible dictionary Each of the subsequent years saw further discussion of the possibility In 2010 the Editorial Council asked Dr Paul M Zehr to develop a budget for the project and to seek funding for it It also asked Dr Douglas B Miller and Dr Loren L Johns the current Old and New Testament editors of the BCBC to serve as editors for the ADB and to launch the project by mid 2012 Early in 2011 Paul Zehr Amy Gingerich of MennoMedia Doug Miller and Loren Johns met to develop further the earlier planning Initial grants funding the project have come from the United Service Foundation and the Schowalter Foundation Project Design The online ADB consists of articles with an invitation to comment Especially significant responses may warrant a separate essay with a link to the original article Authors are expected to be historically and descriptively fair regarding Anabaptist perspectives while also theologically constructive in their writing That is the ADB should not only reflect and reflect on a historical tradition it should also contribute theologically

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  • Pages that link to "Anabaptist Dictionary of the Bible" - Anabaptistwiki
    100 250 500 Global Anabaptist Wiki es links E links B links C links Abbreviations links A links Ecclesiastes links M links Matthew s Distinctive Themes links Matthew links D links I links Israel and Israel s Leaders Mark and Anti Semitism links K links The Eschatology of Mark 13 links L links Luke links F links G links H links J links N links O links P links Q

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  • Anabaptist Dictionary of the Bible - Anabaptistwiki
    Wrath of God in Isaiah Guidelines for Writers Purpose of the Project The purpose of the online Anabaptist Dictionary of the Bible ADB is to reflect and to reflect critically on an Anabaptist approach to the reading of the Bible The Dictionary is intended to serve those in the Anabaptist traditions as well as to be a respectful conversation partner with those in other Christian traditions as authors give voice to an appreciatively critical Anabaptist perspective It is a Bible dictionary wiki project with an Anabaptist flavor Origin and Early History of the Project In 2007 the Editorial Council of the Believers Church Bible Commentary series discussed the advisability of developing an online Anabaptist Bible dictionary Each of the subsequent years saw further discussion of the possibility In 2010 the Editorial Council asked Dr Paul M Zehr to develop a budget for the project and to seek funding for it It also asked Dr Douglas B Miller and Dr Loren L Johns the current Old and New Testament editors of the BCBC to serve as editors for the ADB and to launch the project by mid 2012 Early in 2011 Paul Zehr Amy Gingerich of MennoMedia Doug Miller and Loren Johns met to develop further the earlier planning Initial grants funding the project have come from the United Service Foundation and the Schowalter Foundation Project Design The online ADB consists of articles with an invitation to comment Especially significant responses may warrant a separate essay with a link to the original article Authors are expected to be historically and descriptively fair regarding Anabaptist perspectives while also theologically constructive in their writing That is the ADB should not only reflect and reflect on a historical tradition it should also contribute theologically to Anabaptism as a living vision embodied in multiple church

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  • Information for "Anabaptist Dictionary of the Bible" - Anabaptistwiki
    English en Page content model wikitext Indexing by robots Allowed Number of views 98 608 Number of redirects to this page 0 Counted as a content page Yes Number of subpages of this page 0 0 redirects 0 non redirects Page protection Protections are cascading from here Yes Edit Allow only administrators Move Allow only administrators Edit history Page creator Johndr Talk contribs Date of page creation 03 41 26

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  • American Mennonites and the Bible - Anabaptistwiki
    Waldeck Catechism that follow the common pattern of identifying the two without any technical equation This is quite common in Protestant parlance and should not be cited as evidence of verbal dictation In summary then it may be stated that in none of these confessions and catechisms which were in general use in the American Mennonite churches from 1750 to 1900 is there any attempt to spell out a theory of inspiration for the documents Indeed in the most widely used symbols Dordrecht and Roosen s Catechism there were no articles as such on Scripture The Bible is accepted as completely trustworthy and inspired by God for man s guidance but emphasis falls upon the content and unique value of its message not upon verbal inerrancy Precisely these same emphases characterize the articles tracts and books by American Mennonite authors published in the period 1750 1900 They assumed the Scripture s authority and concentrated on its contents seeking to understand and apply it They conceived of the Bible as a disclosure of God s will and approached it as a 139 book of instructions and moral precepts with the confidence that in its pages they would find the mind of the Holy Spirit Even Christ was for them the giver of a new law and their discussions have mainly to do with the Christian life and conduct This conception of the Bible became for them a hermeneutic principle In their preaching and writing they went to great length to recount the story of man s creation fall and redemption era by era 10 and their purpose was to make clear the relation of law and grace the old and new covenants Thus their expositions of the history of salvation are not so much focused upon the great acts of God as upon man s response to God s disclosures and the developments which lead to the new covenant law They argued that the new law requires a higher spiritual obedience of love and it is the purpose of the New Testament to lead to such obedience This preoccupation with rules of conduct produced many examples of quaint proof texting and the finding of direct guidance from the pages of the Bible Either example or precept sufficed to document a decision of the church In his Useful and Edifying Addresses to the Young 1792 Christian Burkholder a prominent bishop in Pennsylvania argued that interdenominational marriages are forbidden in the Bible on the basis of Numbers 36 6 8 which restricted marriage among the Israelites only to the family and tribe of their fathers 11 Heinrich Funk thought that he could demonstrate that the wicked will be transformed into the appearance of a sackcloth of hair as the scripture says 12 And J M Brenneman of a later generation could find many texts to prove that Christians ought not to laugh aloud 13 I think that we might call this approach to Scripture a pretheological biblicism There is a kind of artless freedom under the guidance of the Spirit to use the Scriptures for admonishing the brotherhood They were not challenged to defend the Bible against attacks upon its authority When they wrote about it they magnified and praised it pointing out the superiority of its contents but they simply assumed its divine origin and validity Therefore to read a theory of verbal inerrancy into their writings is anachronistic They had no defined doctrine of inspiration either as to its scope or exact meaning 140 It is clear then that when we arrive at the opening of the twentieth century the development of an articulate theology of Scripture still lies ahead Even the writing of men like D H Bender M S Steiner and Daniel Kauffman who later espouse verbal and plenary inspiration do not reveal any new emphases on the doctrine of Scripture prior to 1908 Twentieth Century Developments in Mennonite Theology edit In order to see the significant change of mood and emphasis that took place in Mennonite doctrine during the first quarter of the twentieth century one has only to compare the statement on Christian Fundamentals which was adopted by General Conference in 1921 with the earlier confessional symbols This statement was first drawn up by a Committee on the Investigation of Liberalism in the Church appointed in the Virginia Conference in 1918 Members of the committee were George R Brunk Sr A D Wenger and J B Smith the last of whom apparently wrote the eighteen articles The Eighteen Fundamentals were presented by the committee to the 1919 session of Virginia Conference and adopted as the conference statement of faith With few minor editorial changes and additions of Scripture texts these articles were accepted by General Conference meeting at Garden City Missouri in 1921 The Preamble of this Garden City statement sets the mood for the rest It reads In order to safeguard our people from the inroads of false doctrines which assail the Word of God and threaten the foundations of our faith we the Mennonite General Conference herewith make the following declaration regarding the fundamental doctrines of our faith 14 The first article of the statement is on the Bible In it the Bible is simply equated with the Word of God Indeed the article is entitled The Word of God rather than Holy Scripture even though the Bible is the subject The purpose of the article is to defend the authority of Scripture by explicitly equating it with Word of God Further it is declared to be the Word of God on the grounds of its verbal and plenary inspiration not on the grounds of its divine content as in earlier statements And in addition to using the more traditional language concerning its infallibility as a rule of faith and practice the article explicitly says that the original writings were inerrant If we look further in the statement for some hint concerning the implications of this verbal inerrancy theory we are only confirmed in this evaluation Article III reads for example We believe that 141 the Genesis account of the Creation is an historic fact and literally true Here then is a definition of the process and extent of inspiration and it is simply the definition of Reformed and Lutheran Orthodoxy which was again being pressed into service by the Fundamentalists The beginning of this shift in mood and emphasis may be dated at about 1908 and can be traced both in conference minutes and articles published in Mennonite periodicals Prior to that time neither the Herald of Truth Elkhart nor the Gospel Witness Scottdale nor the first volume of the new Gospel Herald for that matter show any serious involvement in the theological storm that was brewing in America In 1907 an article entitled The Bible Inspired which presages the coming storm was published in Daniel Kauffman s editor Gospel Witness In the first volume 1908 of the Gospel Herald Kauffman published an editorial on Inspiration in which he makes the point that the Bible is inspired by God in a unique way and that we must accept Jesus Christ as our Savior and the Bible as the life giving word and only inspired message from heaven 15 These are quite mild and might be overlooked except for what was to follow In 1909 at least three articles from non Mennonite sources on Protestant Apostasy and liberalism were printed The following year John Horsch had a series of excerpts from Menno Simons printed under the title Menno Simons on the Authority of the Holy Scriptures And that same year Kauffman authored and published a series of articles under the title Upon What Fundamentals Should All Christian People Agree The fifth fundamental was on the Bible as the inspired Word of God and he says that denying inspiration is tantamount to denying the Bible After 1910 articles of this type become increasingly numerous Not only are the articles more numerous but they show clear signs of their extra Mennonite source In an article on Inspiration and Authority of the Epistolary Writings in the January 1913 Gospel Herald Abram Metzler speaks of the great tidal wave of the latter day apostasy and of dispensational grace He also used a phrase that was the slogan of the Niagara Bible Conference movement to the law and the testimonies Leaders of the Fundamentalist movement such as W B Riley W J Bryan R A Torrey and Philip Mauro are referred to quoted in articles and reprinted in toto In 1918 George Brunk entered a charge against evolution scientism and higher criticism the latter had come in for ridicule in 142 earlier issues worthy of the best fundamentalist preachers 16 He noted with satisfaction that the scientists presumptuous efforts to create life have come to an inglorious end These are only a few examples that could be multiplied many times A review of conference minutes both district and General Conference reveals the same kind of progression of involvement in the Fundamentalist debate We find the first explicit evidence that the church leaders in general were concerned about the new theological currents in the 1909 minutes of General Conference 17 One of the major questions for discussion that year was the Conference s attitude toward the modern trend of religious thought The question was discussed by P E Whitmer a Bible teacher at Goshen College who was later under the suspicion of liberalism himself and others A resolution was passed in answer to this question as follows Resolved That we stand for a whole Gospel religion which recognizes Father Son and Holy Ghost and the Bible as the inspired Word of God II Tim 3 16 which teaches true conversion and an experimental religion Jno 17 3 Eph 4 13 an acceptance of Christ as our Savior Acts 4 12 His Gospel our rule of life Ga 1 8 9 and His Spirit as our teacher and guide Jno 14 26 16 13 18 In 1911 the question What is meant by the so called essentials and non essentials and how do they effect our church was raised in the Indiana Michigan Conference J E Hartzler the pastor of Prairie Street Church who had just returned from Union Theological Seminary in New York and had only recently received an appointment to the Bible faculty of Goshen College opened the discussion on the question Conference passed a resolution in answer to the question stating that they discourage such classification essential and non essential and encourage the acceptance of the whole Bible as sacred and important I point to this action because it provides significant evidence concerning the stage of developments in one of the first conferences to raise the biblical issue in its formal meetings In the first place its having been raised in Indiana and J E Hartzler s prominence in 143 the discussion indicate one source of the new and unsettling ideas which were beginning to trouble some church leaders and called forth this reaffirmation of orthodoxy Secondly the way in which the question is stated indicates that the major problem was not a doctrine of Scripture but the application of biblical teaching in a changing cultural situation Some of the older applications were being dropped and the justification for dropping them was that they were among the non essentials of the Bible And lastly the language of the resolution indicates that fundamentalist terminology had not yet penetrated here The resolution is in the best Mennonite tradition the whole Bible as sacred and important Incidentally the men on the resolutions committee that year were J K Bixler D A Yoder and S L Weldy That same fall 1911 the Kansas Nebraska conference raised the question whether versions other than the King James Version should be used in public worship They resolved that they should not and proceeded to declare their belief in the verbal inspiration of the Bible in the original They also passed another resolution petitioning the General Mission Board to use utmost caution in selecting candidates for missionary work and requested that only such workers be sent forth that believe in the verbal and plenary inspiration of the Bible and take a stand against the modern trend of religious thought 19 So far as I know this is the first time a conference statement used the phrase verbal inspiration in the original and I strongly suspect that it was no coincidence that J B Smith of the Hesston Bible faculty was on the resolutions committee Smith was the man who perhaps more than any other introduced this kind of theological terminology into our brotherhood Again in 1913 meeting only a matter of days before the General Conference the question of biblical inspiration was raised in the Indiana Michigan conference Again J E Hartzler officially opened the discussion and in addition he served on the resolutions committee At this time Hartzler was the newly elected president of Goshen College Suspicion about the theological orthodoxy of the College Bible faculty and of President Byers made it necessary for Hartzler to declare himself clearly and openly The resolution summarizing the conference position on this question is longer than usual and is divided into four parts It begins by distinguishing between inspiration revelation and dictation Inspiration they wrote has to do with the recording the making truth known but they added that it does not create truth but 144 is found in the use made of truth Then the resolution goes on to affirm the full and complete inspiration of the whole Bible as the message of God to man and that as an inspired record of revelation it is the perfect and heavenly message 20 Here is obviously a studied attempt most likely on the part of Hartzler himself to affirm a high view of biblical inspiration without using fundamentalist terminology It is the message of the Bible as a whole that is inspired perfect and heavenly and its inspiration is found in the use made of truth As we have seen this is fully in harmony with earlier confessions and catechisms Again the fact that B B King who served on the resolutions committee with him as well as other conservative men like J S Hartzler J K Bixler and D D Miller were satisfied with this resolution is good evidence that the finer points of Fundamentalism had still not become part of these men s thinking But there are other signs that fundamentalist theology was beginning to make its impact At the meeting of General Conference at Kalona Iowa that fall 1913 the Conference was asked to define its position on the inspiration of the Bible In answer the following was adopted Ans We accept the Bible as the one inspired infallible inerrant message of God revealing Himself His workmanship and His will to man We believe the inspiration of the Bible to be different in kind and degree from any other literature in this The men who wrote the Bible were in the hands of God to such an extent that their message inbreathed of God is free from all human imperfections and is therefore absolutely inerrant and reliable while in all other literature the imperfections and shortcomings of the writers find their way into their productions Notwithstanding errors in language which appear in translations and revisions the message of God as originally given to man is perfect and furthermore He preserves this message absolutely inerrant making the Bible God s eternal message to man complete and sufficient for all ages 21 At the first reading this resolution sounds very fundamentalistic in tone and language Scripture is the one inspired infallible inerrant message of God Further the men who wrote the Bible were in the hands of God to such an extent that their message is free from all human imperfections and is therefore absolutely inerrant and reliable in contrast to all other literature But then they add somewhat ambiguously that notwithstanding errors in language which appear in translations and revisions the message of God not only as originally given but even in its present form is 145 preserved absolutely inerrant making the Bible God s eternal message to man I have italicized the word message because apparently it is purposely used instead of words of God Thus the message of the present translations is inerrant in spite of errors in language which appear in them 22 In reporting the action of the conference in the Gospel Herald 23 Daniel Kauffman said that the statement spoke to two vital issues 1 The Bible is God s Word 2 It is inerrant And a little later he says Really this is not a debatable question unless you consider the whole doctrine of Christianity debatable It is clear from Kauffman s discussion that he considers inspiration the guarantor of revelation i e the Bible is God s Word by virtue of its inspiration but he rejects the theory of inspiration which represents God as speaking to the world through a set of dummies and affirms that the Bible is at once the message from God and the message from the men whom He inspired for that special work Kauffman does not attempt to spell out a theory of inspiration beyond the Conference statement itself He seems entirely satisfied with it and he reports that the only dissatisfaction expressed to it on the conference floor was that no evidences for the Bible s inspiration were included in the statement One should probably not press the significance of the ambiguity and imprecision of the statement too far because it is obvious that the intention of the Conference was to declare for the orthodox position But this statement does represent another stage in the evolution of Articles I and III of the Christian Fundamentals of 1921 In the meanwhile a General Conference committee which had been appointed in 1911 was at work compiling a book of Bible Doctrine under the general editorship of

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  • Global Anabaptist Wiki - Anabaptistwiki
    Historical Library at Goshen College the site is committed to helping individual groups 1 tell their own stories 2 post and preserve electronic archives and 3 become better informed about other groups in the global Anabaptist fellowship Like all wiki based projects this is a collaborative venture that relies on the local expertise of many people Please Note This project is still in its early stages of construction To explore updates view our recently added pages or recent changes Check back frequently to see what new material has been added Mennonite World Conference Mennonite World Conference MWC is a global faith community in the Anabaptist tradition that links together Anabaptist related churches and engages other world communions and organizations Every six to seven years Mennonite and Brethren in Christ conferences and groups gather for a general assembly In 2009 MWC included 227 organized Mennonite or Brethren in Christ conferences across 80 countries and six continents Membership stood at 1 616 126 with 60 of members living in Africa Asia or Latin America Read more Featured Article Jesus Village Church South Korea Jesus Village Church JVC is one of two Anabaptist affiliated churches in South Korea Unlike other global Anabaptist communities outside of Europe and North America JVC is not the result of a mission plant Rather JVC began out three years of intensive study by Korean Christian professionals as they tried to rediscover the New Testament Church and implement it in a Korean context These leaders felt that the Anabaptist Church fit what they desired most closely and in 1996 they started the JVC Read more Featured Video Menonitas de Chihuahua A variety of different immigrant Mennonite groups live in the Chihuahua state in northern Mexico Click on the links below to learn more about these groups Altkolonier Mennonitengemeinde Old

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  • Permission error - Anabaptistwiki
    89 Talk for this IP address Log in Permission error From Anabaptistwiki Jump to navigation search You do not have permission to edit this page for the following reason This page has been protected to prevent editing or other actions

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