archive-org.com » ORG » A » ASPRS.ORG

Total: 849

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • PE&RS January 2016
    was responsible for establishing the initial data structures for both planimetric data and elevation data through the Digital Line Graph DLG and Digital Elevation Model DEM formats and established the National Digital Cartographic Database for storing and distributing digital data Dr Elassal was active in ASPRS and was among the early pioneers in developing analytical aerotriangulation systems notably the Multiple Station Analytical Triangulation MUSAT method He was a member of the Birdeye Club through his donations to the ASPRS Foundation Dr Elassal was also active in ISPRS and served as Chair of Working Group II 5 Integrated Production Systems He was responsible for developing the General Integrated Analytical Triangulation Program GIANT used by USGS In 1980 Dr Elassal developed the General Cartographic Transformation Package GCTP which was an integrated set of programs to handle map projection compu tations for digital mapping applications GCTP was used by several government agencies as well as by private industry Dr Elassal received ASPRS s Photogrammetric Award Fairchild in 1977 A Google search will indicate that Dr Elassal was the author of numerous papers and agency publications and he is referenced by many others As the senior photogrammetrist at USGS he provided technical assistance to many other Federal agencies and private companies for both aerial and satellite applications Many of these requests were new and novel tasks that required the expert application of analytical methods One interesting project was his work in 1978 when the U S House of Representatives Select Committee on Assassinations requested USGS assistance in their investigation of the assassination of President John F Kennedy The assistance involved photo grammetric analyses of movie film and several snapshots The snapshots were of Lee Harvey Oswald in the backyard of his home in Dallas in 1963 and the movie films were taken during the

    Original URL path: http://www.asprs.org/a/publications/pers/2016journals/PERS_Jan2016_Public/HTML/files/assets/basic-html/page21.html (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive


  • PE&RS January 2016
    ASPRS IS HAPPY TO ANNOUNCE A REDUCTION IN COLORPLATE FEES IN PE RS T hanks to advances in printing technology we are able to lower our colorplate fees All manuscript submitted after January 1 2016 will be accessed a lower fee 500 for 1 3 plates 1000 for 4 6 plates 1500 for 7 or more plates Black and white images will continue to be published without fees In addition when the paper is published we will give each author a complimentary PDF copy of their paper and a hard copy of the journal Extra page fees printed offprints prices and shipping remain the same in 2016 It is our mission to make publishing in PE RS as easy as possible Things are changing experience the new refreshed and revised INTERESTED IN GEOSPATIAL FORENSICS ASPRS is considering establishing a Forensics Group The group would lead ASPRS activities related to geospatial law and might develop or enhance geospatial standards that support the forensic science industry ASPRS has a long track record of developing standards and many of our members practice forensic science so this is a natural fit for us As background the launch of NIST s OSAC in February 2014 has led to an increase in demand for the development of forensic science standards NIST is the National Institute of Standards and Technology and OFAC is the Scientific Area Committees for Forensic Science of NIST If ASPRS decides to participate the 33 OSAC Units consisting of 542 members and approximately 190 affiliates will become potential venues for forensic science standards development activities that relate to imaging and geospatial information Also of interest the crime scene death investigation committee is standing up a crime scene subcommittee which could also use ASPRS support Members of the new ASPRS Forensics Group would initially

    Original URL path: http://www.asprs.org/a/publications/pers/2016journals/PERS_Jan2016_Public/HTML/files/assets/basic-html/page22.html (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • PE&RS January 2016
    extract and model these kind of houses than low density housing The houses may be so close that they appear to be attached in less accurate DSMs As a result it is difficult to isolate one house from the others and even good methods may yield unexpect ed results It is often that two or more houses are detected as one In fact this is a problem in the detection algorithm and a problem of scale Thus we attempt to address the issue using mathematical morphology Comparing with other morpholo gy based segmentation techniques our method reduces frag ment rate and mixing rate greatly in dense residential areas Related Work on Building Extraction There are tens of thousands of buildings in a city which are labor intensive to manually model Automatic modeling using imagery or DSM has been studied for many years but it is still not sufficiently developed for practical applications Thus semi automatic building modeling has been widely applied Ameri et al 2000 Förstner et al 1997 Wang et al 2011 Sampath et al 2010 Existing automatic 2 D building extraction techniques can be categorized into three main types Our method falls in the third category The first category primarily extracts the buildings using image segmentation and pattern recognition on single or multiple images Katartzis et al 2008 Lari et al 2007 Fazan et al 2010 Hao et al 2010 Lee et al 2003 Odue Elberink et al 2011 Although promising results have been shown the imagery only approach does not general ly perform well in densely built up areas partially due to shadows occlusions and poor contrast Awrangjeb et al 2014 Pesaresi et al believed that many methods such as the watershed plus marker segmentation technique were not applicable to textured or very complex scenes and often lead to results that were not stable Pesaresi et al 2001 The second category of methods uses the DSM or lidar point cloud data Cheng et al 2011 Awrangjeb et al 2012 Pfeifer et al 2007 to determine geometric characteristics such as size height and gradient One kind of method uses normal ized DSM nDSM to extract off terrain grids based on a height threshold and then distinguishes buildings from trees using a classification method Awrangjeb et al 2012 Hug et al 1997 Odue Elberink et al 2000 Another kind of method applies segmentation and then classification to distinguish buildings from trees The segmentation can be bottom up Matikainen et al 2001 or region growing Forlani et al 2001 Both of these methods use the height signal as a principal identifier It offers an improved level of automation when compared to image only methods Rottensteiner et al 2003 Zhang et al 2013 The third category of methods integrates aerial imagery and DSM lidar data to exploit the complementary information from both data sources Gerke 2009 Awrangleb et al 2013 Abundant spectral information and high precision boundar ies which are provided by the imagery improve the accu racies for recognizing and

    Original URL path: http://www.asprs.org/a/publications/pers/2016journals/PERS_Jan2016_Public/HTML/files/assets/basic-html/page23.html (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • PE&RS January 2016
    Images Zhuoting Wu Dennis Dye John Vogel and Barry Middleton Estimating Forest and Woodland Aboveground Biomass Using Active and Passive Remote Sensing Robyn A Barbato Karen L Foley Adam LeWinter David Finnegan Sergey Vecherin John E Anderson Kennrth Yamamoto Christian Borden Eathan Fahy Nathan Calandra and Charles M Reynolds The Attenuation of Retroreflective Signatures on Surface Soils Dan Liu Xuejun Liu and Meizhen Wang Camera Self Calibration with Lens Distortion from a Single Image Taoyang Wang Guo Zhang Yonghua Jiang Siyue Wang Wenchao Huang and Litao Li Combined Calibration Method Based on Rational Function Model for the Chinese GF 1 Wide Field of View Imagery Cai Cai Peijun Li and Huiran Jin Extraction of Urban Impervious Surface Using Two Season Worldview 2 Images A Comparison Craig Mahoney Chris Hopkinson Alex Held Natascha Kljun and Eva van Gorsel ICESat GLAS Canopy Height Sensitivity Inferred from Airborne Lidar CALENDAR JANUARY 29 GeoByte Fusion of Geodesy and GIS at NOAA s National Geodetic Survey For more information visit http www asprs org GISD Division Online Seminars html FEBRUARY 26 GeoByte Beyond NDVI 2016 For more information visit http www asprs org GISD Division Online Seminars html MARCH 25 GeoByte A Geospatial Approach to Mapping Environmental Sound Levels Across the United States For more information visit http www asprs org GISD Division Online Seminars html APRIL 11 15 IGTF 2016 Ft Worth Texas For more information visit http conferences asprs org Fort Worth 2016 blog 29 GeoByte Designing National Park Service Visitor Maps For more information visit http www asprs org GISD Division Online Seminars html To have your special event published in PE RS contact Rae Kelley rkelley asprs org MAY 24 25 GEO Business 2016 London United Kingdom F or more information visit http geobusinessshow com 27 GeoByte CyberGIS Foundations and Principles

    Original URL path: http://www.asprs.org/a/publications/pers/2016journals/PERS_Jan2016_Public/HTML/files/assets/basic-html/page32.html (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • PE&RS January 2016
    holds for other common measurement techniques The trade off between surface coverage and measurement resolution in the photogrammetric application can be demon strated using the standard projective formulae also com monly known as the pin hole camera model For a vertical stereo photogrammetric configuration between two identi cal cameras the optical axes are parallel to each other and perpendicular to the baseline For such an arrangement the common field of view CFoV between the two images forming a stereo pair is enlarged whereby 3 D information is extracted by increasing the camera to object distance Z CFoV W Zw f b 1 CFoV H Zh f 2 where f is the camera focal length in pixel b is the constant baseline distance w and h are the width and the height of the cameras sensor in pixel respectively whilst the indices W and H represent the directions parallel and perpendicular to the baseline Values are in metric units unless specifically stated The pixel size in the object space S p which is the minimum usable DEM grid size and the theoretical depth resolution δ Z also called the minimum measurable depth are related to the camera to object distance as following S Zp f p 3 δ Z Z p bf Zp 2 4 where p is the camera pixel size One can see that by increas ing Z both the horizontal i e pixel size in the object space and the depth resolution will deteriorate Increasingly studies regions of interest often exceed the minimal measurement resolution required to record the sur face with solely one DEM To address this issue smaller DEM s thus of higher measurement resolution can be recorded and merged together to produce a DEM that has both acceptable surface coverage and measurement resolution In the

    Original URL path: http://www.asprs.org/a/publications/pers/2016journals/PERS_Jan2016_Public/HTML/files/assets/basic-html/page33.html (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • PE&RS January 2016
    height diameter at breast height to calculate the biomass on the basis of allometric equations Chave et al 2005 Lu 2006 Satellite observations can also be used and although they have the advantage of enabling monitoring of large and remote areas their measurements are less accurate Lu 2006 Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar Pol SAR provides information on changes in the polarization state of electro magnetic waves reflected from the earth surface that can be exploited to extract information for identification and classi fication of different natural features as each polarization is sensitive to different surface characteristics and properties In forestry one of the most important applications of Pol SAR data processing is its use in biomass estimation Carreiras et al 2012 Englhart et al 2012 Huang et al 2009 Lucas et al 2010 Minh et al 2014 Ormsby et al 1985 Sandberg et al 2011 Soja et al 2013 Ticehurst et al 2004 Previous studies have indicated that radar backscatter of Pol SAR data at lower frequencies has a positive correlation with the AGB of forests especially in the cross polarized Horizontal Vertical HV backscatter Englhart et al 2012 Dobson et al 1992 Imhoff and Gesch 1990 Imhoff 1995 Fransson and Israelsson 1999 Santos et al 2002 Saatchi et al 2007 Sader 1987 Sartori et al 2011 Lucas et al 2006 These studies have shown that when used in conjunction with a suitable type of polarization and a robust estimation model multi temporal SAR data re corded during the dry season can provide an improvement in the accuracy of AGB estimations Hame et al 2013 Townsend 2001 Thus in order to find a mapping function between AGB of forests and SAR backscatters linear regression methods Kasischke and Bourgeau Chavez 1997 Mitchard et al 2009 Watanabe et al 2006 arti cial neural networks ANN Amini and Sumantyo 2009 Del Frate and Solimini 2004 and sup port vector regression SVR Camps Valls et al 2006 Englhart et al 2012 Monnet et al 2011 have all been proposed Although multivariate linear regression MLR is a com paratively comprehensible model some studies Mitchard et al 2009 Watanabe et al 2006 have indicated that the results of MLR model may have been underestimated because of its linear nature and improper target results In addition the multi layer perceptron neural networks MLPNN model proposed for AGB estimation by Amini and Sumantyo 2009 tended to overfit data when few observations were used in the training data set Wang et al 2008 reported that deep neural nets with a large number of observations are very power ful machine learning systems overfitting can be a serious problem in such networks when only a few observations are included In addition large networks are slow to use making it difficult to deal with overfitting by combining the predic tions of many different large neural nets at test time Englhart et al 2012 reported that the SVR model is the best machine learning method for biomass estimation but the results have not

    Original URL path: http://www.asprs.org/a/publications/pers/2016journals/PERS_Jan2016_Public/HTML/files/assets/basic-html/page43.html (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • PE&RS January 2016
    in responsibil ities and work for an employer all clients colleagues and associates and society at large and shall 1 Be guided in all professional activities by the highest standards and be a faithful trustee or agent in all matters for each client or employer 2 At all times function in such a manner as will bring credit and dignity to the mapping sciences profession 3 Not compete unfairly with anyone who is engaged in the mapping sciences profession by a Advertising in a self laudatory manner b Monetarily exploiting one s own or another s employment position c Publicly criticizing other persons working in or having an interest in the mapping sciences d Exercising undue influence or pressure or soliciting favors through offering monetary inducements 4 Work to strengthen the profession of mapping sciences by a Personal effort directed toward improving personal skills and knowledge b Interchange of information and experience with other persons interested in and using a mapping science with other professions and with students and the public c Seeking to provide opportunities for professional development and advancement of persons working under his or her supervision d Promoting the principle of appropriate compensa tion for work done by person in their employ 5 Undertake only such assignments in the use of mapping sciences for which one is qualified by education training and experience and employ or advise the employment of experts and specialists when and whenever clients or employers interests will be best served thereby 6 Give appropriate credit to other persons and or firms for their professional contributions 7 Recognize the proprietary privacy legal and ethical interests and rights of others This not only refers to the adoption of these principles in the general conduct of business and professional activities but also as they relate specifically

    Original URL path: http://www.asprs.org/a/publications/pers/2016journals/PERS_Jan2016_Public/HTML/files/assets/basic-html/page52.html (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • PE&RS January 2016
    grapes Myles et al 2011 however like many clonally propagated woody perennials cultivated grapevines are usually two distinct genotypes that are grafted to one another The above ground part of the plant the scion produces the stem leaves flow ers and berries and the below ground part the rootstock makes the lower stem and roots In most regions of the world grafting allows grape growers to retain the economically valuable berry producing varietal e g Cabernet Sauvignon Chardonnay while introducing resistance to soil borne pests and pathogens through rootstocks North American Vitis species have played a vital role in the global grape industry both through the generation of root stocks as well as through their contributions to hybrid scions For example while approximately 90 percent of US grape acreage consists of V vinifera cultivars in California the vast majority of these are grafted to rootstocks derived from native North American grape species including V berlandieri V ri paria and V rupestris In the Midwestern and Eastern United States abiotic and biotic stress preclude most cultivation of even grafted V vinifera ssp vinifera instead in these areas cultivated grapevines are hybrid scions derived from crosses between V vinifera ssp vinifera and one of the native North American Vitis species Today grape growing is becoming a more significant component of rural agricultural development in these areas For example in Missouri grape and wine is a 1 6 billion industry with a 16 percent annual growth rate Stonebridge Research 2010 Despite the importance of na tive North American species for rootstock and scion breeding relatively little is known about our capacity to differentiate different Vitis species remotely Given the increasing importance of North American Vitis species two ongoing challenges in the grape and wine in dustry are to locate wild North American Vitis germplasm for breeding and to monitor plant health in hybrid vineyards in an efficient manner In this study we use spectral signatures to determine whether closely related native grape species could be distinguished from one another remotely These approaches and results have potential applications in ongoing efforts to locate native germplasm for breeding and also in vineyard management where grape growers are looking for new ways to efficiently monitor plant health This study focuses on two native North American grape vines V riparia and V rupestris both of which are used in the generation of hybrid scions and rootstocks Vitis riparia and V rupestris present an interesting system for compar ing spectral responses of plants because they are likely each other s closest relatives Zecca et al 2012 Miller et al 2013 but are differentiated morphologically in terms of leaf shape and leaf ion concentration which has strong implications for monitoring crop health using remote sensing techniques Nat ural populations of V riparia and V Rupestris have evolved to inhabit different types of environments V rupestris occurs on rocky dry creek beds in Missouri and surrounding states Fernald 1987 Its closest wild relative V riparia is found in moister soils

    Original URL path: http://www.asprs.org/a/publications/pers/2016journals/PERS_Jan2016_Public/HTML/files/assets/basic-html/page53.html (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  •