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  • Tree diversity, distribution, history and change in urban parks: studies in Bangalore, India - ePrints@ATREE
    environments Despite the importance they remain little researched This paper assesses the biodiversity and distribution of trees in urban parks in the southern Indian city of Bangalore 127 plots were used to survey tree distribution in parks across the city The distribution is largely dominated by a few common species The proportion of exotic species was very high with 77 of trees belonging to introduced species Park history had an impact on distribution Old parks had fewer but larger trees and greater species diversity compared to recently established parks Old parks also differed in species composition having a greater proportion of large canopy trees compared to young parks Examination of size distributions revealed that large canopied species were gradually being phased out and replaced by narrow and medium sized tree species which are easier to maintain but which may not provide the same environmental and ecological benefits Greater attention requires to be paid to the selection of trees in cities not just with a view to easy maintenance as is currently the case but to select an appropriate mix of trees that supports biodiversity and maximizes environmental and ecosystem services Item Type Article Additional Information Copyright of this article belongs

    Original URL path: http://eprints.atree.org/49/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Items where Year is 2010 - ePrints@ATREE
    1010 K Anitha and Joseph Shijo and Chandran Robert John and Ramasamy E V and Prasad S Narendra 2010 Tree species diversity and community composition in a human dominated tropical forest of Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot India Ecological Complexity 7 2 pp 217 224 Kelkar Nachiket and Krishnaswamy Jagdish and Choudhary Sunil and Sutaria Dipani 2010 Coexistence of Fisheries with River Dolphin Conservation Conservation Biology 24 4 pp 1130 1140 Lele Nikhil and Nagendra Harini and Southworth Jane 2010 Accessibility Demography and Protection Drivers of Forest Stability and Change at Multiple Scales in the Cauvery Basin India Remote Sensing 2 1 pp 306 332 Lele Sharachchandra and Wilshusen Peter and Brockington Dan and Seidler Reinmar and Kamaljit Bawa S 2010 Beyond exclusion alternative approaches to biodiversity conservation in the developing tropics Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 2 1 2 pp 94 100 Nagendra Harini and Gopal Divya 2010 Street trees in Bangalore Density diversity composition and distribution Urban Forestry UrbanGreening 9 2 pp 129 137 Nagendra Harini and Rocchini Duccio and Ghate Rucha 2010 Beyond parks as monoliths Spatially differentiating park people relationships in the Tadoba Andhari Tiger Reserve in India Biological Conservation 143 12 pp 2900 2908 Patel Mohanakumara and Nambiar Sreejayan and Vaidayanathan Priti and Bheemanahally Thimmappa Ramesha and Gudasalamani Ravikanth and Kotiganahalli Narayanagowda Ganeshaiah and Vasudeva Ramesh and Mohan John and Thankayyan Retnabai Santhoshkumar and Mishra Prabhu Dutt and Viswakarma Ram and Uma Shaanker Ramanan 2010 Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook f Meliaceae a rich source of rohitukine Fitoterapia 81 2 pp 145 148 Purushothaman Seema and Kashyap Sham 2010 Trends in land use and crop acreages in Karnataka and their repercussions Karnataka Journal of Agricultural Sciences 26 2 pp 330 333 Ranganathan Jai and Krishnaswamy Jagdish and Anand MO 2010 Landscape level effects on avifauna within tropical agriculture

    Original URL path: http://eprints.atree.org/view/year/2010.type.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Items where Year is 2010 - ePrints@ATREE
    Anitha and Joseph Shijo and Chandran Robert John and Ramasamy E V and Prasad S Narendra 2010 Tree species diversity and community composition in a human dominated tropical forest of Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot India Ecological Complexity 7 2 pp 217 224 Kelkar Nachiket and Krishnaswamy Jagdish and Choudhary Sunil and Sutaria Dipani 2010 Coexistence of Fisheries with River Dolphin Conservation Conservation Biology 24 4 pp 1130 1140 Lele Nikhil and Nagendra Harini and Southworth Jane 2010 Accessibility Demography and Protection Drivers of Forest Stability and Change at Multiple Scales in the Cauvery Basin India Remote Sensing 2 1 pp 306 332 Lele Sharachchandra and Wilshusen Peter and Brockington Dan and Seidler Reinmar and Kamaljit Bawa S 2010 Beyond exclusion alternative approaches to biodiversity conservation in the developing tropics Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 2 1 2 pp 94 100 Nagendra Harini and Gopal Divya 2010 Street trees in Bangalore Density diversity composition and distribution Urban Forestry UrbanGreening 9 2 pp 129 137 Nagendra Harini and Rocchini Duccio and Ghate Rucha 2010 Beyond parks as monoliths Spatially differentiating park people relationships in the Tadoba Andhari Tiger Reserve in India Biological Conservation 143 12 pp 2900 2908 Patel Mohanakumara and Nambiar Sreejayan and Vaidayanathan Priti and Bheemanahally Thimmappa Ramesha and Gudasalamani Ravikanth and Kotiganahalli Narayanagowda Ganeshaiah and Vasudeva Ramesh and Mohan John and Thankayyan Retnabai Santhoshkumar and Mishra Prabhu Dutt and Viswakarma Ram and Uma Shaanker Ramanan 2010 Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook f Meliaceae a rich source of rohitukine Fitoterapia 81 2 pp 145 148 Purushothaman Seema and Kashyap Sham 2010 Trends in land use and crop acreages in Karnataka and their repercussions Karnataka Journal of Agricultural Sciences 26 2 pp 330 333 Ranganathan Jai and Krishnaswamy Jagdish and Anand MO 2010 Landscape level effects on avifauna within tropical agriculture in the

    Original URL path: http://eprints.atree.org/view/year/2010.default.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Development of eleven microsatellite markers in the red-listed tree species Myristica malabarica - ePrints@ATREE
    family and is characterized by species that are highly endemic to the Western Ghats area of India Myristica malabarica is confined to the evergreen forests of Western Ghats and Sri Lanka In this paper we describe for the first time the development of eleven polymorhpic microsatellite markers for Myristica malabarica which had 2 14 alleles per locus These microsatellite markers could be used to study the population genetic structure of

    Original URL path: http://eprints.atree.org/4/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Sustaining biodiversity conservation in human-modified landscapes in the Western Ghats: Remnant forests matter - ePrints@ATREE
    areas and other remnant forests We investigated the conservation value of these landscapes and agro ecosystems using results from 35 studies covering 14 taxonomic groups Large conspicuous taxonomic groups and tree covered land use types have received much focus in this area of research in the Western Ghats We computed a response ratio defined as the log ratio of species richness in human land use to species richness in forest control site from 17 studies In a meta analysis we investigated variation of this ratio across studies with respect to three variables taxonomic group the landuse type sampled and the extent of forest cover within the study landscape Higher forest cover within the landscape emerged as a major positive influence on biodiversity in human modified landscapes for vertebrates and vegetation while no patterns emerged for invertebrates Our results suggest that loss of remnant forest patches from these landscapes is likely to reduce biodiversity within agro ecosystems and exacerbate overall biodiversity loss across the Western Ghats Conservation of these remnant forest patches through protection and restoration of habitat and connectivity to larger forest patches needs to be prioritized In the densely populated Western Ghats this can only be achieved by building

    Original URL path: http://eprints.atree.org/11/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Jatropha plantations for biodiesel in Tamil Nadu, India: Viability, livelihood trade-offs, and latent conflict - ePrints@ATREE
    171Kb Request a copy Abstract Researchers policy makers and civil society organizations have been discussing the potential of biofuels as partial substitutes for fossil fuels and thereby as a simultaneous solution for climate change and rural poverty Research has highlighted the ambiguity of these claims across various dimensions and scales focusing on ethanol producing or oilseed crops in agricultural lands or Jatropha type crops on common lands We studied the agronomic and economic viability and livelihood impacts of Jatropha curcas plantations on private farms in Tamil Nadu India We found that Jatropha yields are much lower than expected and its cultivation is currently unviable and even its potential viability is strongly determined by water access On the whole the crop impoverishes farmers particularly the poorer and socially backward farmers Jatropha cultivation therefore not only fails to alleviate poverty but its aggressive and misguided promotion will generate conflict between the state and the farmers between different socio economic classes and even within households The water demands of the crop can potentially exacerbate the conflicts and competition over water access in Tamil Nadu villages Item Type Article Additional Information Copyright of this article belongs to Elsevier Uncontrolled Keywords Biofuel Biodiesel Rural livelihoods

    Original URL path: http://eprints.atree.org/36/ (2016-05-01)
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  • The political ecology of Jatropha plantations for biodiesel in TamilNadu, India - ePrints@ATREE
    37 4 pp 875 897 Text JPS lele vol 37 no 4 2010 pdf Published Version Restricted to Registered users only Download 190Kb Request a copy Abstract Jatropha curcas is promoted internationally for its presumed agronomic viability in marginal lands economic returns for small farmers and lack of competition with food crops However empirical results from a study in southern India revealed that Jatropha cultivation even on agricultural lands is neither profitable nor pro poor We use a political ecology framework to analyse both the discourse promoting Jatropha cultivation and its empirical consequences We deconstruct the shaky premises of the dominant discourse of Jatropha as a propoor and pro wasteland development crop a discourse that paints a win win picture between poverty alleviation natural resource regeneration and energy security goals We then draw from fieldwork on Jatropha plantations in the state of Tamil Nadu to show how Jatropha cultivation favours resource rich farmers while possibly reinforcing existing processes of marginalisation of small and marginal farmers Item Type Article Additional Information Copyright of this article belongs to Taylor Francis Uncontrolled Keywords biofuels political ecology marginalisation India Jatropha Subjects C Publications by ATREEians G Journal Papers Divisions Publications by ATREEians Journal Papers

    Original URL path: http://eprints.atree.org/40/ (2016-05-01)
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  • The impact of forest use and reforestation on soil hydraulic conductivity in the Western Ghats of India: Implications for surface and sub-surface hydrology - ePrints@ATREE
    less disturbed forest Forest disturbed production forest of various local species Degraded Forest and tree plantations Acacia auriculiformes 7 10 years old Tectona grandis 25 30 years old Casuarina equisetifolia 12 years old in the Uttar Kannada district Karnataka India in the Western Ghats The sampling strategy was also undertaken across three physiographic blocks and under three main soil types Subsequently the determined K were then linked with rainfall intensity duration frequency IDF characteristics to infer the dominant stormflow pathways The Degraded Forest shows an order of magnitude decline in K at the surface as result of human impacts at decadal to century time scales The lowest surface permeability is associated with the Degraded Forests over the Laterite Eutric Nitosols and Acrisols and Red soils Eutric Nitosols and infiltration excess overland flow IOF probably occurs Further there is a progressive decline in K with depth in these soils supporting Degraded Forests The A auriculiformes plantations over the Red and Lateritic soils are progressively restoring the near surface K but their K still remain quite low when compared to the less disturbed forest permeability Consequently these plantations still retain the memory from the previous degraded state In contrast the permeability of the Black soils Vertisols are relatively insensitive to T grandis plantations and this soil group has a very low K irrespective of land cover so that IOF likely prevails Overall the Laterites are the most variable in K when compared to the other soil groups Thus when compared to other studies IOF is probably more prevalent in this region More especially so when taking into account the marked reduction in surface K during the wet season when compared to dry season measurements In addition we have demonstrated the potential for the infiltration trade off hypothesis to be realized in this

    Original URL path: http://eprints.atree.org/43/ (2016-05-01)
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