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  • EXXONMOBIL CORPORATION
    market today which provide nose to tail solutions for all aviation related applications In addition ExxonMobil Aviation Lubricants developed and currently supplies to Russia CIS a tailormade product to serve as a fleetwide Jet engine lubricant for the Russian Turbojet power plants and accessories ExxonMobil Aviation Lubricants youngest activities on the Russian market include application of fire resistant hydraulic fluid for modern Russian CIS aviation technology ExxonMobil Aviation Lubricants are

    Original URL path: http://www.aviamarket.org/directory/e/725-exxonmobil-corporation.html (2016-02-13)
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  • CAC J-7
    under nose small shoulder mounted canards just forward of wingroot leading edge WP13F engine 1553B databus avionics to include 43 n mile 80 km 50 mile range pulse Doppler radar possibly IAI Elta EL M 2032 single HUD and dual HDDs 3 000 kg 6 614 lb external stores load Wind tunnel testing completed first flight then targeted for late 2001 early 2002 but most recently forecast for second half of 2003 Performance expectations include M1 8 top speed 16 000 m 52 500 ft ceiling 650 m 2 135 ft T O run and 1 403 n mile 2 600 km 1 615 mile ferry range Possibly testbed for some features of J 10 F 7MG Improved version of F 7M G suffix indicates gai modified combining double delta wings of J 7E with Grifo MG radar other upgraded avionics uprated WP13F engine and leading trailing edge manoeuvring flaps Said to have 45 per cent better manoeuvrability than F 7M Public debut aircraft 0142 and 0144 at China Air Show Zhuhai November 1996 Pakistan see F 7PG only customer so far but Bangladesh said to have requirement for up to 12 and Zimbabwe interested in enough for two squadrons F 7MP Further modified variant of F 7P improved cockpit layout and navigation system incorporating Rockwell Collins AN ARN 147 VOR ILS receiver AN ARN I49 ADF and Pro Line II digital DME 42 Avionics contract for up to 100 sets delivered to China from early 1989 FIAR now Galileo Grifo MG fire control radar range of more than 30 n miles 55 km 34 miles for F 7P and MP ordered 1993 to replace Skyranger flight trials began May 1996 and completed in 1997 F 7N Variant of F 7M mentioned in 1996 F 7MG brochure but no details given Possibly an alternative designation for Zimbabwe F 7 IIN see F 7BS F 7P Airguard Variant of F 7M briefly called Skybolt embodying 24 modifications to meet specific requirements of Pakistan Air Force including ability to carry four air to air missiles Sidewinders instead of two and fitment of Martin Baker Mk 10L ejection seat Delivered 1988 91 F 7PG Pakistan Air Force designation of F 7MG 57 plus six FT 7PGs ordered in late 2000 Deliveries to Nos 17 and 23 Squadrons at Samungli replacing Shenyang F 6s completed by second quarter 2002 third squadron expected to be No 2 at Mas r o or Grifo 7PG radars still awaiting firm contract at end 2002 would be produced by KARF factory of PAC Possibility of follow on order for up to 25 more including FT 7PG trainers FT 7 Export designation of JJ 7 two seat trainer CUSTOMERS Several thousand built for Chinese air forces Air Divisions currently equipped with J 7 variants comprise Nos 1 2 3 4 9 12 14 15 18 21 24 26 29 33 35 42 and 44 plus naval 4th each with two or three Regiments totalling up to 100 aircraft Nos

    Original URL path: http://www.aviamarket.org/reviews/military-aircraft/1080-cac-j-7.html (2016-02-13)
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  • SAC J-8 II
    November 2000 Full authority quad redundant three axis digital AFCS small canards mounted high on air intakes to induce instability two 1553B standard flight computers with databus interface integrated servo actuators for all moving control surfaces J 8C New production variant originally J 8 III apparently based on development work with J 8 II ACT Features include fly by wire flight controls canards WP14 turbojets 73 6 kN 16 535 lb st with afterburning in flight refuelling probe and new IAI Flta EL M 2034 or similar fire control radar Prototype 8301 reportedly flew in 1993 but flight test not completed until late 2001 may now be in limited use J 8D Finback B Mod Designation originally J 8 IV of 12 or more J 8Bs built or modified for in flight refuelling non retractable but possibly removable probe on starboard side of cockpit combat radius increased to 648 n miles 1 200 km 745 miles In service with PLA Air Force and Navy JZ 8 Reconnaissance version also reported as J 8E and J 8 V believed to be converted from J 8A at least six known Retains gun armament undernose sensor package similar to that fitted to some Su 17 20 22 variants centreline pod similar in appearance to that carried by MiG 21R incorporating large rectangular camera window or SLAR antenna In service with PLA Air Force F 8 II Originally proposed export version subsequently modified to become present F 8 IIM F 8 IIM Upgraded version described separately CUSTOMERS PLA Air Force and Navy DESIGN FEATURES Extension of late 1950s Soviet heavy fighter theory Thin section mid mounted delta wings and all sweptback tail surfaces fuselage has area rule waisting detachable rear portion for engine access and dorsal spine fairing Large ventral fin under rear fuselage main portion of which folds sideways to starboard during take off and landing provides additional directional stability small fence on each wing upper surface near tip small airscoops at foot of fin leading edge and at top of fuselage each side above tailplane Sweepback 60 on wing and tailplane leading edges wings have slight anhedral FLYING CONTROLS Hydraulically boosted ailerons rudder and low set all moving tailplane two segment single slotted flaps on each wing trailing edge inboard of aileron four door type undetfuselage airbrakes one under each engine air intake trunk and one immediately aft of each mainwheel well STRUCTURE Conventional aluminium alloy semi monocoque stressed skin construction with high tensile steel for high load bearing areas of wings and fuselage and titanium in high temperature fuselage areas ailerons rudder and rear portion of tailplane are of aluminium honeycomb with sheet aluminium skin dielectric skins on nosecone tip of main fin and on non folding portion of ventral fin leading edge LANDING GEAR Hydraulically retractable tricycle type with single wheel and oleo pneumatic shock absorber on each unit Steerable nose unit retracts forward main units inward into centre fuselage mainwheels turn to stow vertically inside fuselage resulting in slight

    Original URL path: http://www.aviamarket.org/reviews/military-aircraft/998-j-8.html (2016-02-13)
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  • SAC F-8 IIM
    the systems quoted for the J 8 II ACT CUSTOMERS Developed primarily for export but none yet ordered however improvements now being adopted as upgrade for in service PLA AF J 8Bs DESIGN FEATURES Main differences from J 8B are more powerful engine improved avionics and modernised cockpit with HOTAS controls POWER PLANT Two LMC Liyang WP13B turbojets each rated at 47 1 kN 10 582 lb st dry and 68 7 kN 15 432 lb st with afterburning SYSTEMS Electrical system includes two 15 kVA starter generators AVIONICS Comms Advanced com nav radios IFF Radar Phazotron Zhuk 8 II multifunction look up look down pulse Doppler radar with 38 n mile 70 km 43 5 mile detection range for approaching targets and 21 5 n mile 40 km 25 mile range for receding targets both targets assumed to have 3 m 2 32 3 sq ft radar cross section N010 Zhuk 27 being flight tested by late 1998 presumably in second aircraft Flight Include Tacan and datalink locally developed HUD and INS GPS navigation MFDs HOTAS controls ARINC 429 databus Self defence Omnidirectional RWR rear hemisphere noise jammer against threat including pulse Doppler radars chaff flare dispenser ARMAMENT Up

    Original URL path: http://www.aviamarket.org/reviews/military-aircraft/997-f-8.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Grumman F-14A Tomcat
    extended 19 54m 64ft 2in span wings swept 11 65m 38ft 3in length 19 10m 62ft 8in height 4 88m 16ft Oin Wing area 52 5m2 565 0sq ft Accommodation Pilot and radar intercept officer RIO in tandem ARMAMENT F 14A One internal GE M61A1 Vulcan 20mm cannon Typical intercept configuration of two AIM 54 Phoenix the world s longest ranging air to air missile two AIM 7 Sparrows and two AIM 9 Sidewinders or combinations thereof In ground attack configuration can carry up to 6577kg 14 500lb of conventional bombs OPERATORS USA HISTORY Arguably the most capable air defence fighter currently in service the Tomcat emerged from the embers of the failed F 111B program The cancellation of the overweight F 111B left the US Navy without a successor for the F 4 Phantom which it flew primarily in the air defence role Grumman acted as the lead contractor for the US Navy s version of General Dynamics F 111 but had begun design studies on a new air defence fighter even before the F 111B s cancellation One of Grumman s design concepts the G 303 was thus selected in January 1969 to fill the gap left by the demise of the F 111B The two crew G 303 was designed from the outset for carrier operations although it retained many of the features of the F 111 including the powerful AWG 9 radar system and AIM 54 Phoenix compatibility the P W TF30 afterburning turbofans and swing wings Other design features included the twin tails and moveable foreplanes or glove vanes The first prototype F 14 flew for the first time December 12 1970 this aircraft subsequently crashed due to hydraulic failure while a total of 556 production aircraft were delivered to the USN from 1972 Pre

    Original URL path: http://www.aviamarket.org/reviews/military-aircraft/67-grumman-f-14a-tomcat.html (2016-02-13)
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  • McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle
    of 7257kg 16 000lb Typical CAP fit of four AIM 7 Sparrows on fuselage corner stations and two AIM 9 Sidewinder or AIM 120 Amraams on each wing pylon OPERATORS Japan Israel Saudi Arabia USA HISTORY Without doubt the pre eminent air superiority fighter since the mid 1970s backed by a 70 to nil kill ratio the F 15 Eagle s airto air abilities are only challenged by the Sukhoi Su 27 Design work on a new fighter for the USAF first began in the mid 1960s although the program gained fresh impetus later that decade when US spy satellites revealed the existence of the MiG 23 and the fast high flying MiG 25 The FX requirement took in the hard learnt air combat lessons of Vietnam and called for a fighter with a thrust to weight ratio in excess of unity and that could out turn any potential adversary to bring its missiles to bear first McDonnell Douglas s design was chosen ahead of proposals from Fairchild Republic and North American Rockwell with the result that the first development F 15 Eagle took to the skies for the first time on July 27 1972 Design features of the F 15 include the specifically developed P W F100 turbofans selected ahead of a GE design the Hughes APG 63 radar a high wing of great area and then advanced cockpit displays including a HUD The F 15 subsequently entered service in January 1976 and 355 F 15AS and 57 two seat F 15Bs were built Israel was the first F 15 export customer and that nation s Eagles were the first to be used in combat Production switched to the improved F 15C D in 1979 Changes are minor but include the ability to carry the conformai fuel tanks CFTs

    Original URL path: http://www.aviamarket.org/reviews/military-aircraft/199-mcdonnell-douglas-f-15-eagle.html (2016-02-13)
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  • General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon
    for USAF was due to terminate with FY94 batch but six additional F 16Cs funded in each of FY96 and FY97 plus three in FY98 one in FY99 10 in FY00 and four in FY01 FY96 and subsequent aircraft to Block 50 standard F 16s delivered from mid 2000 FY97 and later to improved configuration incorporating modular mission computer by Raytheon replacing three core avionics processors that was developed for F 16A B MLU programme Honeywell colour liquid crystal multifunction displays replacing monochrome CRT MFDs Honeywell colour programmable display generator Teac colour airborne videotape recorder colour cockpit TV sensor and Litton onboard oxygen generating system OBOGS FY00 and subsequent aircraft have AN APX 113 and associated avionics improvements Majority of FY00 and FY01 aircraft delivered to USAF between April and December 2002 but final Block 50 will receive full CCIP upgrade before being handed over in December 2004 USAF Block 50 52 F 16Cs unofficially designated F 16CJ First Samsung assembled F 16C Block 52D rolled out in South Korea on 7 November 1995 First flight of initial TAI built F 16C Block 50D in late May 1996 with delivery to Turkish Air Force following on 29 July last TAI produced F 16 delivered October 1999 First Block 50D delivered to Greece 29 January 1997 First Block 52D delivered to Singapore 30 January 1998 First production lease PL Block 52D aircraft for Singapore was delivered 28 May 1998 this was under terms of commercial contract with delivery achieved in less than 24 months from placing of order First delivery of F 16C Block 52 in Korea Fighter Program II in June 2003 aircraft produced under license by KAI Advanced Block 50 52 Latest production version originally referred to as Block 50 52 Basic configuration includes upgraded AN APG 68 V 9 radar with 30 per cent greater air to air detection range and synthetic apertute radar SAR mode for high resolution mapping and target detection recognition Is also compatible with latest FLIR navigation and targeting pod systems and has upgrated core avionics including an improved modular mission computer two 102 mm 4 in colour cockpit displays cockpit and exterior lighting compatible with night vision goggles helmet mounted cueing system a digital terrain system IFF interrogator transponder high off boresight missile compatibility Link 16 datalink and OBOGS Available with a choice of internal electronic countermeasures equipment and able to take various customer unique systems Maximum take off gross weight increased to 21 772 kg 48 000 lb Can be fitted with new low drag conformal fuel tanks with combined capacity of 1 705 litres 450 US gallons 375 Imp gallons Additional fuel in optional 2 271 litre 600 US gallon 500 Imp gallon auxiliary wing tanks Two seat aircraft have a rear cockpit configured for either a weapon system operator or instructor pilot converted with a single switch plus a dorsal avionics compartment that accommodates all of the systems of the single seat aircraft plus additional chaff flare dispensers and specialised mission equipment First customer for this enhanced version was Greece which revealed intention on 30 April 1999 to buy as many as 70 Block 52s Contract subsequently placed for 50 aircraft with fixed price option for up to 10 more that was converted to firm order on 14 September 2001 Aircraft deliveries began 2 April 2003 with handover of first five aircraft three F 16C and two F 16D at Fort Worth both F 16Ds and one F 16C initially to be retained in USA for training and test purposes Other customers for Advanced Block 50 52 aircraft are Chile Block 50 Oman Block 50 and Poland Block 52 Israel is also to acquire Advanced Block 52 aircraft GF 16C Unofficial designation allocated to non flying aircraft in use at Sheppard AFB for instructional purposes from 1993 USAF F 16C D Retrofit Programmes F 16 originally designed to fly 8 000 hours based on specified usage spectrum but actual usage has in most cases been more severe with aircraft regularly flying at higher operational weights than originally predicted USAF F 16C D aircraft have undergone structural upgrade programme known as Falcon UP but this is being superseded by Falcon STAR structural augmentation roadmap Modifications accomplished under these two programmes will ensure that aircraft achieve 8 000 hour service life without depot inspection Many changes incorporated in production aircraft but older F 16 models will need more extensive modification USAF Falcon STAR retrofit kit proofing is being conducted in 2003 with pilot production and installation to start in 2004 At least 10 other countries are involved in this programme ANG AFRC Block 25 30 32 F 16C Ds subject to combat upgrade plan integration details CUPID which completed by mid 2003 CUPID brought approximately 620 older F 16s to a standard close to that of the Block 50 52 aircraft Among the improvements incorporated are situation awareness datalink SADL improved airborne videotape recorder colour camera initial NVG compatible cockpit lighting LANTRIN and Rafael Litening II FLIR targeting pod capability AN ALQ 213 countermeasures control system and provisions for GPS laser gyro INS Future improvements include expanded central computer joint helmet mounted cueing system AIM 9X missile follow on NVIS capability PIDS 3 pylon upgrade for smart weapon compatibility ACES II ejection seat improvements enhanced main battery and software upgrades Block 40 42 F 16C Ds are currently being upgraded to include NVG compatibility MD 1295 A improved data modem digital terrain system AN ALE 47 chaff dispenser towed decoy and smart weapons compatibility including the GBU 27 JDAM JSOW and WCMD Block 50 52 F 16C Ds already have these capabilities Three squadrons of ANG Block 42 aircraft currently receiving F100 PW 229 engine as replacement for original F100 PW 220 first engines installed in mid 2002 and subsequently deployed to Middle East In June 1998 USAF launched an upgrade effort known as common configuration implementation program CCIP which is intended to provide common hardware and software capability to 648 Block

    Original URL path: http://www.aviamarket.org/reviews/military-aircraft/94-f-16.html (2016-02-13)
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  • KAI F-16C/D Fighting Falcon
    1991 120th aircraft delivered on 19 April 2001 Decision to produce a further 20 Block 52 standard announced 13 May 1999 approved July 2000 as KFP 2 deliveries were to have started in July 2003 COSTS US 663 million estimated for additional 20 1999 POWER PLANT One Pratt Whitney F100 PW 229 turbofan AVIONICS Mission Lockheed Martin LANTIRN pods ARMAMENT Includes AGM 84 Harpoon AGM 88 HARM and AIM 120

    Original URL path: http://www.aviamarket.org/reviews/military-aircraft/181-lockheed-martin-f-16c-fighting-falcon.html (2016-02-13)
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