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  • BioEdge: Spanish girl at centre of futile care controversy dies
    this was against the law and medical ethics and that the child was not in pain A lawyer who supported its decision pointed out that a feeding tube is an ordinary and fairly common procedure many older persons have one and with it can live for many years The regional health chief Rocío Mosquera publicly denounced Andrea s parents request as active euthanasia She was sacked over her forthright remarks Finally the hospital changed its policy The feeding tube was removed and Andrea was terminally sedated with just enough hydration to keep her comfortable The hospital declared that it was simply applying appropriate treatment in response to the girl s worsening condition The hospital s critics interpreted it as capitulation to pressure Her parents said that although they realised that Andrea would die we weren t ready for the fact that when our daughter s body stopped responding she would not be given a dignified death the way her life had been dignified Sorry we missed this story earlier in the month MORE ON THESE TOPICS euthanasia Spain terminal sedation This article is published by Michael Cook and BioEdge under a Creative Commons licence You may republish it or translate

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/spanish-girl-at-centre-of-futile-care-controversy-dies/11620 (2016-02-18)
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  • What did Udo Shuklenk really say about neonatal euthanasia?
    heart or other organs are misarranged in the body The association were seeking insight on whether it would be permissible in such cases to euthanise a baby Shucklenk responded There appear to be some cases then where continuing existence is not in a severely impaired neonate s best interest Terminating its life based on parent choice seems a prima facie reasonable option Schuklenk has gone to pains to point out that he didn t write severe deformities but rather severely impaired Schuklenk goes on to consider various arguments for and against this procedure He argues that there is a good case to allow parents of the neonate to go proxy for him or her He also criticises the notion of human dignity as question begging Such claims are question begging they typically assume the truth of what they need to demonstrate Human dignity has no clear universally agreed upon meaning A quality of life proponent could just as well argue that respect for human dignity demands that the infant s life be terminated on compassionate grounds He considers terminal sedation as an alternative to euthanising the severely impaired child in the end he argues that parental distress and the unnecessary drain on health care resources make euthanasia an acceptable option Health care resources ought to be deployed where they can actually benefit patients by improving their quality of life This cannot be achieved in the scenario under consideration For those of you who can t access the article itself the above will hopefully serve as a useful summary I ll leave it up to commenters to editorialize MORE ON THESE TOPICS euthanasia neo natal euthanasia terminal sedation Udo Schuklenk This article is published by Xavier Symons and BioEdge under a Creative Commons licence You may republish it or translate it

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/what_did_udo_schuklenk_really_say_about_neonatal_euthanasia/11275 (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: the latest news and articles about bioethics
    following the publication of a conference paper in which he advocated neonatal euthanasia in certain extreme circumstances Search BioEdge Subscribe to BioEdge newsletter Subscribe to BioEdge RSS feed Recent Posts Dutch psychiatric patients may get euthanasia too easily says US study 14 Feb 2016 A Dutch report applies the brakes on completed life euthanasia 13 Feb 2016 Celebrating 15 years of Dutch euthanasia 13 Feb 2016 Canada s euthanasia courts

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/tag/neo-natal+euthanasia (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: Disabled girl allowed to die of dehydration in UK
    round the clock untreatable pain to the great distress of Ms Fitzmaurice and her partner With the support of London s Great Ormond Street Hospital she applied to have Nancy euthanased by withdrawing nutrition and hydration The matter went to the Justice Eleanor King of the High Court who ruled on August 7 that it was in the mother and daughter s best interests to withdraw food and fluids In her own closed world Nancy has had some quality of life Sadly that is not the case now she said It was the first time that a child who was not terminally ill and was not on life support was permitted to die in this way Nancy died on August 21 after great suffering The last day was the hardest of my life It was absolutely horrifying Ms Fitzmaurice told the Daily Mail The case was not widely reported but the policy followed by the hospital and approved by the judge had severe critics The Autistic Self Advocacy Network an American group described it as killing a disabled person Euthanasia of people with disabilities is an extremely dangerous and wholly inappropriate solution to inadequate pain management In cases where painkillers are insufficient a number of alternatives for pain management exist A policy of euthanasia targets vulnerable people particularly when it is applied to children People with disabilities who experience chronic pain should have same access as others to life sustaining medical treatment Bioethicist Arthur Caplan of NYU Langone Medical Center was guarded in his assessment but told The Daily Beast that he would have preferred to increase the level of sedation rather than allow the girl to die of thirst MORE ON THESE TOPICS England euthanasia terminal sedation This article is published by Michael Cook and BioEdge under a Creative

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/disabled_girl_allowed_to_die_of_dehydration_in_uk/11223 (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: More questions about Belgian euthanasia
    slow euthanasia But it can be In nearly 22 of terminal sedation cases the doctor explicitly intended to end the life of the patient In other words the patients were euthanased even if death did not happen immediately If this is true the real proportion of euthanasia cases in Flanders nearly trebles to 3 3 not just 1 26 as reported in the study Or at least that was the figure seven years ago in 2007 Even the authors seemed a bit rattled by the fact that in 79 7 of cases of terminal sedation there was no explicit request from the patient These were not necessarily unethical There could have been proper reasons why no consent was given patients could have been unable to give consent because they were in a coma or demented relatives may have given consent by proxy or there may have been a living will What concerns the authors is that many Flemish doctors do not understand what palliative sedation is They conclude by recommending more education so that doctors will act within ethical and legal limits Physicians seem to use palliative or terminal sedation as an umbrella term to capture a wide variation of end of life practices the ambiguity of the use of the term can also be a barrier to a responsible justifiable and reliable sedation practice in end of life care Better knowledge of palliative sedation including its procedural and ethical requirements and boundaries may be necessary and would allow physicians to provide appropriate medical treatment at the end of life MORE ON THESE TOPICS Belgium euthanasia informed consent terminal sedation This article is published by Michael Cook and BioEdge under a Creative Commons licence You may republish it or translate it free of charge with attribution for non commercial purposes

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/more_questions_about_belgian_euthanasia/10836 (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: Savulescu proposes alternative to euthanasia
    they die Such a decision could be made through an advance directive Patients are already able to starve themselves Savulescu observes and there is no reason why they should not be given relief when doing so The provision of medical care for patients who are inflicting pain on themselves is something we already do and we should make no exception when patients chose to refuse food Savulescu sees an analogy in treatment for alcoholics and smokers Savulescu refers extensively to Tony Nicklinson a British stroke victim who after losing a court battle to receive medical assistance in his suicide began to refuse all food He died just a week later Nicklinson did not receive extraordinary palliative sedation in his final week MORE ON THESE TOPICS Julian Savulescu terminal sedation voluntary palliated starvation This article is published by Xavier Symons and BioEdge under a Creative Commons licence You may republish it or translate it free of charge with attribution for non commercial purposes following these guidelines If you teach at a university we ask that your department make a donation Commercial media must contact us for permission and fees Some articles on this site are published under different terms Please enable

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/savulescu_proposes_alternative_to_euthanasia/10618 (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: the latest news and articles about bioethics
    a new way out voluntary palliated starvation Search BioEdge Subscribe to BioEdge newsletter Subscribe to BioEdge RSS feed Recent Posts Dutch psychiatric patients may get euthanasia too easily says US study 14 Feb 2016 A Dutch report applies the brakes on completed life euthanasia 13 Feb 2016 Celebrating 15 years of Dutch euthanasia 13 Feb 2016 Canada s euthanasia courts 13 Feb 2016 IVF audit in Australia 13 Feb 2016

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/tag/voluntary+palliated+starvation (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: Doubts emerge about Dutch guidelines for terminal sedation
    These define it as the use of drugs in the last two weeks of life to induce deep unconsciousness for patients who have refractory symptoms combined with the withdrawal of nutrition and hydration The main point of the guidelines was to insist that palliative sedation is not euthanasia not even slow euthanasia It is normal medical practice The provision of fluids for a patient under palliative sedation is regarded as medically futile The authors of the JME article point out however that this approach skates over some difficult problems First how can doctors be sure that the life expectancy is only two weeks The chairperson of a regional review committees for euthanasia even said in 2007 that It is unprofessional to render a person with a long life expectancy asleep and refrain from hydration and nutrition That s just euthanasia with other means because without food and fluid everyone dies after a week Second the guidelines describe it both as a radical medical procedure and normal medical practice How can it be both of these Third because it is normal medical practice which euthanasia is not its purpose must be to alleviate suffering not to end life However a 2004 study showed that in 17 of cases doctors used it to end lives Fourth because it is considered normal medical practice the KNMG says that a doctor does not need to consult his decision with a colleague and in fact almost none of them do However the European Association for Palliative Care and the American Medical Association insist on consultation The authors argue that KNMG eliminated the need for consultation in order to distinguish palliative sedation from euthanasia which does require consultation They point out that when consultation for palliative sedation was required at a cancer centre the result was

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/doubts_emerge_about_dutch_guidelines_for_terminal_sedation/10163 (2016-02-18)
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