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  • BioEdge: the latest news and articles about bioethics
    Inmaculada de Melo Martin Cornell and Arleen Sales St John s University argue that the impact of pharmacological interventions on moral behavior is unclear and further that bioenhancement is incapable of solving what seem to be massive structural problems climate change global poverty and so forth Alas moral bioehancement won t stop climate change Xavier Symons 07 June 2014 Comments tags bioethics discourse climate change moral bioenhancement Several recent articles in leading journals have considered the ability of moral bioehancement to produce environmentally conscious citizens and thus indirectly reduce carbon emissions In a recent post on Practical Ethics the blog s administrator asserts that too few people would accept the offer of bioehancement and hence it would have a negligible effect on climate change Moral bioehancement debate intensifies Xavier Symons 10 May 2014 Comments tags egalitarianism Julian Savulescu moral bioenhancement Bioenhancement has been receiving increased attention since the 2013 publication of Julian Savulescu and Unfit for the Future The Need for Moral Enhancement by Julian Savulescu and Ingmar Persson An April special issue of the American Journal of Bioethics explores the benefits and dangers of Persson and Savulescu s project Search BioEdge Subscribe to BioEdge newsletter Subscribe to BioEdge RSS

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/tag/moral+bioenhancement (2016-02-18)
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  • The ethics of preimplantation diagnosis
    would chose to be screened for genetic predispositions Parents must honor these preferences of embryos for we should respect the hypothetical choices of rational agents Zuradzki claims that anyone should do this regardless of their ethical code My argument demonstrates that even if somebody perceives the freezing and subsequent destruction of the surplus embryos remaining after an in vitro procedure to be the moral equivalent of killing adults and thus sees potential parents who decide on PGD as just as immoral as the terrorists in the above example she should still accept PGD as a method of embryo selection Catholic teaching on the treatment of frozen embryos has been a topic of much bioethical debate recently Zuradzki s argument draws attention to this The Church has described embryos as being in an ethical limbo and suggests that any way in which we try to handle the embryos will be morally illicit MORE ON THESE TOPICS bioethics discourse embryo screening preimplantation genetic diagnosis This article is published by Xavier Symons and BioEdge under a Creative Commons licence You may republish it or translate it free of charge with attribution for non commercial purposes following these guidelines If you teach at a

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/the_ethics_of_preimplantation_diagnosis/10977 (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: the latest news and articles about bioethics
    our children Xavier Symons 28 March 2014 Comments tags embryo screening genetic testing intelligence Julian Savulescu Oxford bioethicist Julian Savulescu calls for genetic screening of the unborn for IQ genes Pregnant mum refuses to make designer baby despite risks Jared Yee 07 May 2010 Comments tags embryo screening human drama IVF PGD 2 kids with cystic fibrosis and maybe one more on the way Search BioEdge Subscribe to BioEdge newsletter

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/tag/embryo+screening (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: Is human dignity a stupid idea?
    death and anti freedom He objects strongly to Kass s distaste for licking ice cream cones on the street But eventually he grapples with human dignity itself He criticises it for being relative some people find public consumption of ice cream dignified fungible colonoscopies are undignified and we willing endure them and harmful think of Saddam Hussein s highly dignified military parades An insistence on human dignity will eventually put us all at risk of being arrested by the ice cream police Pinker argues What most people call dignity is simply respect for autonomy and respect for persons and nothing more Theocon bioethics also rejects developments in modern science and medicine including longevity improved health embryonic stem cell and IVF according to Pinker It does not want medical practice to maximise health and flourishing it considers that quest to be a bad thing not a good thing No doubt there is a personal element in this dust up This is not the first clash between the two scholars Writing in the journal Commentary last year Kass s defence of a non materialist account of human nature against the Harvard academic was rather acerbic One hardly knows which is the more impressive the height of Pinker s arrogance or the depth of his shallowness he does not understand that the empowering organization of materials the vital form is not itself material But Pinker being no philosopher still fails to grasp Kass s interpretation of human dignity He thinks it has a lot to do with ice cream cones even though Kass explicitly founds it upon man s capacity for reason freedom judgment and moral concern In any case if the Council wanted to spark a debate it has succeeded The book was debated at Stanford Law School a few days ago

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/is_human_dignity_a_stupid_idea/8149 (2016-02-18)
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  • Kristján Kristjánsson on virtuous medical practice
    and the under estimation of professional judgement Some attention seems to be paid in medical ethics education to what used to be called bedside manners dress code manner of speaking demeanour politeness etiquette cultural sensitivity However between the codes and the manners the moral middle gets squeezed out moral character as learning to perceive moral salience responding emotionally in the right way and making practically wise decisions based on the most virtuous course of action As many doctors correctly pointed out medical phronesis is not inborn it requires attention and training both in medical education and further in the workplace In Virtuous Medical Practice you asked doctors what they thought were the most important virtues for a medical practitioner to acquire Was there a general consensus The consensus was astounding across the three cohorts much more so than in our two parallel projects into virtues in teachers and lawyers Fairness honesty judgement kindness leadership and teamwork scored highest as the virtues of the ideal practitioner The respondents attributed the same strengths to themselves except for judgement and leadership and those also fed into the way they responded to the moral dilemmas in the survey Some gender differences were noticed with kindness scoring higher for women Most of the conflicts that the doctors mentioned did not involve a choice between virtue and vice but rather hard choices between two or more competing virtues What do you think their answers show They seem to show that students enter medical studies with a fairly mature and robust view of the kind of doctor they want to be and this view does not change much during the course of their study or work experience An anecdotal explanation could be that quite a few students enter medicine from families where a parent or a grandparent is also a doctor Thus professional virtues and values may filter through down the generations On a more negative note the most disconcerting finding of the study in my view was that more than 20 of experienced doctors say they sometimes or often experience difficulties in living out their characters that is they fail to live up to their own ideals and moral expectations of themselves The reasons they give are not surprising however too little time to consult discuss treat unrealistic targets and shrinking budgets Do you yourself share these doctors view of important virtues i e would you have selected other virtues I find the above list reasonable as such However lists of this kind are less important than the capacity to develop the meta virtue of phronesis for adjudicating virtue conflicts Most of the conflicts that the doctors mentioned did not involve a choice between virtue and vice but rather hard choices between two or more competing virtues Consultation cannot be learnt from rule books either about abstract principles or earthbound mannerisms Based on your research what do you think are the most important changes that need to be made to medico ethical education models The main

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/kristjan-kristjansson-on-virtue-in-medical-practice/11388 (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: the latest news and articles about bioethics
    2013 Comments tags bioethics medical education medical students A recent study has indicated that medical students are not retaining the ethical terms taught to them in ethics classes Search BioEdge Subscribe to BioEdge newsletter Subscribe to BioEdge RSS feed Recent Posts Dutch psychiatric patients may get euthanasia too easily says US study 14 Feb 2016 A Dutch report applies the brakes on completed life euthanasia 13 Feb 2016 Celebrating 15

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/tag/medical+students (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: Interview: David Albert Jones on Brüstle stem cell ruling
    make companies uproot but I hope it will be a nudge which will encourage them to look more at other more ethical kinds of stem cells BioEdge How has the decision been greeted in the UK Is there a different reaction in other countries in Europe David Albert Jones In the United Kingdom the press has widely reported the comments of Oliver Brüstle and similar comments by British scientists The status of the human embryo is not taken seriously in the United Kingdom and the views of the embryonic stem cell lobby are accepted uncritically The United Kingdom is also ambivalent about its relationship with Europe and so it is easy to report this case in a way that plays on anti European feeling My impression is that the attitude in other European countries and particularly in Germany is quite different BioEdge In your opinion why do human embryos deserve special respect in Germany but not in the UK David Albert Jones This is a complex question and relates not only to religion Germany is more than 30 Catholic whereas in England the population is less than 10 Catholic but more importantly to cultural and historical context In Germany given their history there is a reluctance to sacrifice ethical principles for pragmatic considerations BioEdge Why should science and industry care about ethical limits if the result of their research will benefit the economy David Albert Jones Economic wealth is a human good but it is not one that should be pursued at any cost People may draw a line at different points but everyone draws the line somewhere BioEdge In the English speaking world at least this is a surprising decision as the plaintiff is not a Christian group but Greenpeace What explains the coincidence of interests here David Albert Jones Greens are not generally opposed to legal abortion though of course some are As a movement they are concerned primarily not with the embryo as a person but with the manipulation of human nature as shown by cloning eugenics genetic engineering and the patenting of life Also Greens tend to come to biotechnology with a more critical attitude and are more likely to see through the hype of claims made by companies with a financial interest BioEdge The court declared that ethics must take precedence over commercial interests Many would say that this is imposing the ethics of a Christian minority upon scientists How would you respond David Albert Jones This case was not brought by a Christian group and it is extreme permissive views like those in the United Kingdom that seem to be in a minority in this area Research is allowed in the United Kingdom that is illegal in many countries in Europe and the United Kingdom even allows research that is banned by the European Convention in Human Rights and Biomedicine Nevertheless patent protection requires cooperation between countries and part of the price of this cooperation has been the upholding of some minimum ethical standards

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/interview_david_albert_jones_on_bruestle_stem_cell_ruling/9801 (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: Interview: Art Caplan on boycotting Chinese organ transplants
    expand their ability to do transplants and to attract more non Chinese cash customers by creating what they call medical cities How have doctors journals and scientists reacted to your proposal Has there been any resistance It is too soon to tell So far the reaction has been a bit disappointing no ringing endorsements from any journals or professional societies How have the Chinese reacted No reaction at all The Chinese government has vowed to end the practice of using organs from executed prisoners Why haven t they stopped Do you think that they will stop I think many Chinese health care professionals do want the practice to end But they are sceptical about whether they can get the public to support cadaver organ donation And I believe the military which appears to play a key role in running prisons and some of the transplant hospitals is less concerned about execution as a key source of transplantable organs As in other Asian countries there is great resistance to organ donation in China If they cannot rely upon executed prisoners what would you advise them to do They must create a cadaver organ donor system Period There is always resistance when these programs are launched there was in the USA decades ago and more recently in Denmark and Israel A strong campaign with clear explanations of rights and safeguards is the key to public acceptance What if a prisoner did give his consent A prisoner on Oregon s death row recently published an op ed in the New York Times volunteering his organs Prisoners in China come in all forms political religious criminal I doubt we can take consent at face value Nor do I think we can trust consent to donation from persons being executed in the USA The hope

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/art_caplan_on_boycotting_chinese_organ_transplants/9776 (2016-02-18)
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