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  • BioEdge: the latest news and articles about bioethics
    Cook 23 May 2015 Comments tags commercialization stem cell business stem cells Regulators in the United States and Australia are examining the burgeoning field of stem cell therapies Search BioEdge Subscribe to BioEdge newsletter Subscribe to BioEdge RSS feed Recent Posts Dutch psychiatric patients may get euthanasia too easily says US study 14 Feb 2016 A Dutch report applies the brakes on completed life euthanasia 13 Feb 2016 Celebrating 15

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/tag/stem+cell+business (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: Should we pay commercial providers to assist suicides?
    of conscience He takes a very sceptical view of the competence of doctors A commercial provider may not be skilled at detecting depression but neither are doctors The most common psychiatric disorder and at the same time the disease that is most commonly associated with suicidal intentions is depression Several studies clearly show that a large number of physicians fail to recognize the depressive disorders of their patients This is particularly remarkable because people with depression account for about 10 of a GP s patients Therefore it is not justified to say that doctors are in general particularly able to assess the conditions for an autonomous decision for suicide Nor are doctors particularly competent at prescribing adequate doses of drugs to commit suicide a doctor does not normally learn in education and medical practice how many grams of sodium pentobarbital cause a quick death Above all the necessary knowledge about the correct dosage is limited and can easily be acquired by non physicians Kipke feels that patients would have more autonomy in making their final decision if they use a commercial provider Studies have shown that doctors assessment of the quality of life and of the suicidal wishes of seriously ill patients depends significantly on the psychological situation of the doctors themselves and that they systematically underestimate the quality of life of their patients Quite a few doctors also advocate directive counselling even on morally controversial issues It is probable that this is not fundamentally different with regard to their decisions for or against suicide Finally would CAS be another step forward in the insidious commercialisation of human life No says Kipke Doctors always earn their living from the needs of their patients no one takes offence Why not a commercial provider MORE ON THESE TOPICS assisted suicide commercialization This

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/should_we_pay_commercial_providers_to_assist_suicides/11246 (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: Let’s chill: New York’s egg freezing party
    first one took place at the NoMad Hotel in Manhattan on August 12 I don t have a significant other but I hope to one day and have kids one woman told the New York Post I want to take my fertility into my own hands rather than put pressure on the person I have my next relationship with I don t want to be in the position when I m in my late 30s and panicking because I haven t found the right man and I d compromise and take anyone off the street Or as EggBanxx s marketing director described her own egg freezing experience The pressure is off and I feel so empowered I can now concentrate on my career and becoming who I want to be before having children So how does EggBanxx make its money It acts as a broker for egg retrieval by its network of IVF clinics around the US and for low cost finance It also offers a 15 discount on what IVF clinics charge for the procedures and medications All over the world fertility experts warn women that their fertility is finite that after 35 it drops sharply and that it is best to have children early But freezing cannot guarantee a baby especially since most women who freeze their eggs have entered an era of declining fertility According to a survey by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine the average age at which women freeze eggs is 34 already late Lord Robert Winston a British IVF pioneer argues that egg freezing is a confidence trick that allows avaracious IVF clinics to exploit the fears of desperate women Women are spending vast amount of money on this treatment but the success rates simply aren t there In fact less than 10

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/lets_chill_new_yorks_egg_freezing_party/11134 (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: Couples fall victim to surrogate fraud
    given birth to at least two children for other couples and has a son of her own Her brother Shaun McLoughlin had no sympathy for her The parents pinned all their hopes on her They had to go through the agony of believing they were going to have a child and then that the baby had died Who would do that to another human being he said And in the United States a well known surrogacy agency Planet Hospital has gone into bankruptcy with about US 1 million owed to its clients Its founder and CEO Rudy Rupak Acharya says that he is devastated and remorseful One client Jonathan Dailey a lawyer claims that he lost 30 000 and complained to Al Jazeera America that he had never seen that level of fraud He Mr Acharya was a master of diplomacy of making you feel warm and fuzzy about Planet Hospital Dailey alleged His fraud knew no international boundaries However had Mr Acharya s clients read the Planet Hospital blog more closely they would have realised that they were dealing with someone who had more in common with a used car salesman than a medical specialist Here is a selection from his patter about a new Mexican clinic after India banned surrogacy for gay couples and single people I am developing a distinction of becoming a professional pioneer First I pioneered medical tourism then Indian surrogacy for western patients then gay surrogacy in India surrogacy in Panama the first HIV surrogacy kidney transplants with a global donor exchange micro insurance and who knows what else Now I get to pioneer surrogacy in Mexico and Thailand all while watching surrogacy in India unravel spectacularly MORE ON THESE TOPICS commercialization fraud surrogacy This article is published by Michael Cook and BioEdge under

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/couples_fall_victim_to_surrogate_fraud/10974 (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: Evidence-based medicine comes under attack
    notion of treatment based on scientifically validated evidence No one But the critics of EBM argue heatedly that the standards for the evidence are often low and tainted by commercial or personal interests Dr Spence accuses drug companies of manipulating the gold standard to their own benefit Today EBM is a loaded gun at clinicians heads You better do as the evidence says it hisses leaving no room for discretion or judgment EBM is now the problem fueling overdiagnosis and overtreatment A number of letters pointed out that while EBM had its flaws doctors still need to exercise their clinical judgement They write the prescriptions not the drug companies Dr Spence was supported by Dr Miran Epstein a medical ethicist at The London School of Medicine He writes that EBM does not regard polluted information whether it involves misconduct or not as a sufficient condition for rendering disclosure inadequate Thus it lets informed consent degenerate into a legal fiction and the principle of autonomy into a cynical farce Worst of all it is perfectly ethical being the codified expression of the collective conscience of our medicine it naturally purports to be moral And he was supported by lawyer and ethicist Charles Foster writing in the Practical Ethics blog He believes that the editors of journals need the help of a regulator to sift the wheat from the chaff Journals can t do it all We need a cynical skeptical well funded well staffed and ideologically very left wing regulator With huge teeth MORE ON THESE TOPICS commercialization evidence based medicine This article is published by Michael Cook and BioEdge under a Creative Commons licence You may republish it or translate it free of charge with attribution for non commercial purposes following these guidelines If you teach at a university we

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/evidence_based_medicine_comes_under_attack/10841 (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: Wet nursing is a cow of a job, say bioethicists
    Françoise Baylis and Ryan Tonkens have condemned as demeaning and exploitative in the Dalhousie University blog Impact Ethics The practice of including breast milk in pregnancy contracts is perhaps a harbinger of things to come In the extreme we can imagine the role of women working under contract for intending parents expanding significantly Their list of contractual duties could include providing gametes accepting embryo transfer carrying the developing fetus es to term doing all that is necessary during the pregnancy to ensure fetal health birthing the neonate s following a birth plan dictated by the intending parents providing breast milk to nourish the newborn infant s providing child care services and when the child ren is are sleeping or being entertained by the legal parents perhaps do a little housekeeping and cooking and so on Commercialisation has already made great advances in this area They point out that in the US commercial surrogacy contracts sometimes include breastfeeding Internet breast milk can be purchased for prices ranging from 50 cents to 3 an ounce As breast milk is considered to be a food in US law it can be bought and sold unlike other bodily substances like blood Baylis and Tonkens argue that this is wrong Is there anything morally wrong with reducing parenting to a legal relationship while others bear birth nourish and care for the children one claims to parent Our short answer to this question is yes MORE ON THESE TOPICS commercialization surrogacy wet nursing This article is published by Michael Cook and BioEdge under a Creative Commons licence You may republish it or translate it free of charge with attribution for non commercial purposes following these guidelines If you teach at a university we ask that your department make a donation Commercial media must contact us for

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/wet_nursing_is_a_cow_of_a_job_say_bioethicists/10646 (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: Big business cashing in on reproductive services boom
    market for whom fertility treatments were previously unaffordable The company employs over 80 fertility specialists supported by 650 staff It performed about one third of all of Australia s 39 000 fertility cycles last year According to Virtus s prospectus IVF cycles and other assisted reproductive services generated revenue of more than 350 million Virtus has now set its eyes on expansion into Asia CEO Sue Channon told the Australian Financial Review AFR that The Asia Pacific China India and Middle East markets are very immature and highly fragmented and we are looking for opportunities in these areas at the moment AFR finance expert Michael Stutchbury said that Virtus is in a bit of a sweet spot as it s a unique offering IVF is not listed anywhere else in the world and healthcare is a strong growth area Even the Wall Street Journal is following Virtus s growth with keen interest As The Australian punned this is a fertile ground for investment MORE ON THESE TOPICS commercialization IVF This article is published by Xavier Symons and BioEdge under a Creative Commons licence You may republish it or translate it free of charge with attribution for non commercial purposes following

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/big_business_cashing_in_on_reproductive_services_boom/10534 (2016-02-18)
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  • BioEdge: Why not buy and sell embryos, ask scholars in NEJM
    if the relevant clinic goes bankrupt What would happen to such embryos if a gamete provider objects to the sale after fertilization or demands that the embryos be returned or destroyed These unanswered legal questions give us the most pause about mainstreaming made to order embryos Coordinated efforts by legislators and professionals will be required if this legal void is to be addressed However Cohen and Adashi seem confident that these issues can be solved After all the issues surrounding commercial sperm and egg donation are also complex but Americans are still free to buy and sell gametes Their arguments rest on three pillars First the sale of gametes is already accepted Why not embryos Second embryos obviously do not deserve special respect since they are routinely destroyed in IVF clinics and laboratories Third the sale of embryos in no way resembles the abhorrent sale of children The latter involves potential harm to an already existing child The former involves choosing whether particular children will be produced or not and the practice is more similar to the sale of gametes than the sale of children Is a market in made to order embryos the future of assisted reproduction Actually as Cohen and Adashi point out it is its present At least one clinic in the US offers discount IVF for infertile couples by creating a single batch of embryos from one oocyte donor and one sperm donor then divvying it up among several patients Only two or three states have banned the sale of embryos Commenting in Bill of Health a Harvard Law School blog John Robertson an expert in reproductive law from the University of Texas at Austin and the chair of the Ethics Committee of the ASRM says that parentage is not really a problem He believes however

    Original URL path: http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/why_not_buy_and_sell_embryos_ask_scholars_in_nejm/10476 (2016-02-18)
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