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  • Biology-Online • View topic - Red lichen on most rocks but not some
    etc Does anyone have a suggestion Attachments Reply with quote JackBean JackBean Posts 5694 Joined Mon Sep 14 2009 7 12 pm Tue Sep 10 2013 12 43 pm Could be but I would rather expect some recent disturbance Similarly when I was in Tatra mountains in Slovakia it was obvious which stone is in place for very long time and which was broken just recently Reply with quote vk4vfx vk4vfx Posts 69 Joined Tue Jun 27 2006 3 33 pm Wed Nov 20 2013 8 55 am Maybe because of its exposure to sunlight or being a dam I am sure they have catchment maintenance and one of the jobs would be to keep noxious weeds at bay So the target species of weeds they may have sprayed at the bottom of the lichen growth may of oversprayed from drift onto t he rocks and killed the lichen in that area any selective or non selective herbicide would do this If you look closely there appears to be a lot of dead what look like weeds directly in front of the the whiter rocks Reply with quote JackBean JackBean Posts 5694 Joined Mon Sep 14 2009 7 12 pm

    Original URL path: http://www.biology-online.org/biology-forum/about33927.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Biology-Online • View topic - Herbarium
    of Europe This term I have Taxonomy and ecology of plants and at the end of the term I will have to give a herbarium with 120 specimens to my lecturer I would like to have some exotic specimens that do not grow in our flora in my herbarium I am looking for somebody who can give me an advice or recommend somebody who I can exchange some specimens with

    Original URL path: http://www.biology-online.org/biology-forum/about41635.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Biology-Online • View topic - plant u.s.d.a. soil taxonomy preferences
    2015 4 17 am I am hoping someone will know of a resource which lists native wild N American plants and their U S D A soil taxonomy soil preferences down to the Subgroup or at least Greatgroup level I have seen a great deal of info on soil taxons which list representative plants but nothing from the other perspective Post a reply Jump to Select a forum General Biology

    Original URL path: http://www.biology-online.org/biology-forum/about41632.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Biology-Online • View topic - China injects uncertainty into world of genetically modified
    and cotton genetically modified seeds representing hundreds of millions of dollars in research and the promise of billions in sales U S regulators have given the green light for Dow s Enlist corn and soybeans while final approval is expected shortly for Monsanto s new Xtend cotton and soybean systems There is however a potential problem China The marketing of new biotech seeds has long been fraught with perils of one sort or another because of the global nature of grain trading A seed might be approved in the U S but that doesn t mean other nations are ready for it Historically it s taken an extra two years to gain approvals in China which won t even consider a new engineered seed until it s been approved by the originating country But lately the secretive nation which happens to be the top importer of soybeans has become something of a wild card when it comes to unapproved seeds There seems to be a bit of a breakdown in the predictability of that two year time frame said Nathan Fields director of biotechnology for the National Corn Growers Association in Chesterfield We re just not sure what s happening in China But what everyone does know is what happens when China enforces its rules That was hammered home in November 2013 when China decided for reasons not totally clear to test incoming corn shipments Regulators found traces of Viptera a biotech seed introduced in 2010 by Syngenta of Switzerland but not yet approved by China And just like that U S corn s door to China was effectively slammed shut In the months that followed somewhere around 1 million tons of U S corn were rejected creating havoc in global pricing Industry estimates suggest the losses to corn growers

    Original URL path: http://www.biology-online.org/biology-forum/about41409.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Biology-Online • View topic - What is Epidermis,Hypodermis and endodermis of plants?
    these They are not animals Reply with quote Athira Athira Posts 6 Joined Fri Jan 09 2015 1 41 pm Thu Jan 15 2015 4 20 pm Yes it is true that plants have hypodermis and endodermis See like we animals plants also have a well defined and somewhat complex tissue system And that too there are different types of tissues systems in different parts of the plant And you are right epidermis is the outermost layer being common in root stem or leaf It depends on which one you want to know Root stem or leaves OK so let me briefly tell about the tissue system in a stem Following data are very brief please study about the anatomy of a typical plant body first to understand the following points clearly 1 Epidermis Outermost protective thin layer of the stem just like the epidermis of or skin kind of analogy Note Hypodermis and endodermis are the layers present in the cortex region of a stem 2 Hypodermis This layer consists of collenchymatous cells which are used to provide mechanical strength esp for young stems 3 Endodermis This is the innermost layer of the cortex which contains starch grains and

    Original URL path: http://www.biology-online.org/biology-forum/about31288.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Biology-Online • View topic - What happens to water during photosynthesis?
    wrote What happens to water during photosynthesis Where in the chloroplast does this occur To be particular water marks the beginning of photosynthesis One Molecule water breaks into Hydrogen and Oxygen Ions and supplies 2H and 2e to PS II via OEC Oxygen Evolving Complex Equation H2O 2H 1 2O2 2e Thats the first step in photosynthesis And there is no more water in whole photosynthesis I suppose Reply with quote wtwt5237 wtwt5237 Posts 14 Joined Thu May 31 2007 2 58 pm Fri Jun 01 2007 7 21 am no water is degradated but water acts as carrying agents somewhere if my memories don t get it wrong Reply with quote MrMistery MrMistery Posts 6832 Joined Thu Mar 03 2005 10 18 pm Location Romania small and unimportant country Fri Jun 01 2007 8 12 pm water is split into 2 hydrogen ions 2 electrons and an oxygen atom that quickly combines with another oxygen atom to form molecular oxygen This occurs at the beginning of the light reaction of photosynthesis This is actually a very important thing because it produces molecular oxygen which can then be used for cellular respiration by other organisms or the plant itself Where does it take place Well the only molecule in nature that can oxidise water is P680 the reaction center of photosystem II The actual photolysis occurs on the thylacoid lumen side of the thylacoid membrane in a complex protein machine that contains Cloride fittingly named water splitting complex Reply with quote daniel kurz daniel kurz Posts 167 Joined Fri May 19 2006 1 47 am Sat Jun 02 2007 1 35 am This process is done to replace the ions loss in photosystem II Those are the ones in the chloroplasts The electrons are excited by photons from the sun

    Original URL path: http://www.biology-online.org/biology-forum/about10850.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Biology-Online • View topic - Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?
    a badger So I will be happy if one of you all can explain why it is like this Thanks in advance Reply with quote Babybel56 Babybel56 Posts 65 Joined Mon Apr 18 2011 11 35 am Location University of Cambridge UK Fri Feb 28 2014 9 27 am phloem The phloem cells are loving cells whilst the xylem are formed of dead cells The xylem are on the inside of the vascular bundles and eventually are used to create the dead heartwood at the centre of the trees This means the phloem are always on the outside the trunk just beneath the periderm bark If you take off the bark you are likely to damage the phloem as well The phloem transport glucose from where it is produced the leaves to the roots so they can continue to grow Reply with quote JackBean JackBean Posts 5694 Joined Mon Sep 14 2009 7 12 pm Fri Feb 28 2014 3 15 pm Babybel56 living cells yeah the phloem is basically part of the bark so whenever you damage the bark down to the wood you re destroing also the phloem However phloem doesn t transport nutrients and it definitely doesn

    Original URL path: http://www.biology-online.org/biology-forum/about37063.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Biology-Online • View topic - Avascular Moss
    do not have any xylem or phloem so they are avascular Reply with quote th1 rhs13 th1 rhs13 Posts 69 Joined Wed Apr 20 2005 5 59 am Wed Jul 27 2005 8 58 pm Avascular Mossses are also bryophytes they have Rhizodes which aren t true roots Thus Avascular Increase your reading skills or play with sites dictionary Reply with quote Dr Stein Dr Stein Posts 3501 Joined Thu Jul 07 2005 7 58 am Location 55284 Yogyakarta Indonesia Thu Jul 28 2005 1 35 am Just a little bit correction Avascular plant is a plant that does not have vascular bundles xylem pholem for their trasportation system Mosses are avascular because they just us modified parenchymes to do this job as they don t have those bundles Avascular plant is NOT a plant that does not have true root That s not a proper definition You should make a good definition by looking the etimology of the term If a plant does not have true root radix and just rhizoid it is called as thallus If a plant does have true root it is called as cormus at MOD Would someone please change the title thus match to the content Thank you Reply with quote th1 rhs13 th1 rhs13 Posts 69 Joined Wed Apr 20 2005 5 59 am Thu Jul 28 2005 4 52 am Thanks for clearing that up Botany is not my focal pont I thought I could comment on the matter but I stand corrected Reply with quote BasicBiology BasicBiology Posts 26 Joined Wed Jul 30 2014 2 27 am Location New Zealand Website Tue Nov 18 2014 1 01 am Mosses are considered to be non vascular plants because they lack xylem and phloem The phloem and xylem are used to transport fluids

    Original URL path: http://www.biology-online.org/biology-forum/about1856.html (2016-02-17)
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