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  • Botany 2013 - Abstract Search
    s Institutions Abstract Title Abstract Keywords Program Schedule Programs At A Glance Detailed Programs Custom Schedule Sessions Date Time Locations or Search Botany 2013 Home View Attendees Login Send Email Message From Name From Email To Maria A Gandolfo Subject Message Please type in the 5 characters between 0 and 9 and between A and F shown above and submit the form What is this for If the characters are

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=contactbyemail&id=32 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany 2013 - A cryptic species of Cascadian <em>Pyrola</em> (Ericaceae): overlooking the late bloomer
    because variation in leaf morphology for all species can confound field identification All three traditionally recognized species P picta P dentata and P aphylla occupy generally the same range and commonly occur in sympatry due to similar habitat preferences and nutritional requirements In this talk we describe a new cryptic species Pyrola cryptofolia ined within the P picta complex that is remarkably similar in appearance to P picta but is genetically quite distinct The species is restricted to the Cascade Mountains of the Pacific Northwest and Coastal Mountains of northern California Due to the difficulty of identifying P cryptofolia in the field it has been difficult thus far to amass enough collections of the species to conduct thorough morphological studies but our findings based on samples identified by DNA nucleotide sequence polymorphisms suggest that P cryptofolia differs consistently from sibling taxa in the size of its calyx and floral bracts in addition to a later flowering time We discuss both the consequences of recognizing cryptic species and the implications of genetic divergence without corresponding morphological change on our understanding of evolutionary patterns and processes in genus Pyrola Broader Impacts Log in to add this item to your schedule 1 Rancho

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=801 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany 2013 - Active Visual Learning of Plant Lifecycles
    one direction of information flow There is no input output loop no real engagement with the material In active visual learning the student gets the added benefit of working with photographs symbols or diagrams that summarize information in a cohesive way In this workshop we will work with active visual learning of plant life cycles Life cycle drawings summarize isolated bits of information and combine them into meaningful schema Use of these schematic diagrams helps students overcome the biggest limitation to reasoning the limitation of working memory Working memory can hold only 7 9 bits of information at one time For this reason the limitations of working memory are the most significant impediments to effective learning Instead of having to memorize isolated bits of information lifecycle diagrams aggregate these bits into coherent pictures that can be used to actively recall details of the lifecycle After an introduction to basic plant lifecycles and some work with a standardized method of drawing the lifecycles we will introduce and do several types of exercises that can be used as study aids and as effective homework One of these will be paper based and the other will make use of active learning software developed

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=32 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany 2013 - Additivity in Polyploid Genomes: <em>Tragopogon</em> Allotetraploids as a Case Study
    2 n 12 parents T dubius and T porrifolius and T dubius and T pratensis respectively This classic paper addressed the link between genotype and biochemical phenotype and provided a mechanism enzyme multiplicity that might explain the expanded ranges of polyploids relative to their diploid progenitors This documented additivity is at the core of the allopolyploid paradigm in which genes from the parental species are represented and then expressed in the new polyploid But what if this additivity is not retained in polyploids Recent studies of T mirus and T miscellus have revealed loss of genetic material at several loci rendering these allotetraploids essentially diploid at these loci More dramatic chromosomes of one parental species can substitute for those of the other in the genomes of the allotetraploids such that a tetraploid individual may have three or four copies of one parental chromosome and one or zero chromosomes of the other These recent data demonstrate the dynamic nature of polyploid genomes and suggest that the paradigm of consistent additivity at all loci should be revised in fact certain loci may be retained in duplicate while others undergo loss of one parental copy The foundational studies by Gottlieb and collaborators on

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=846 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany 2013 - African yam bean ( sphenostylis stenocarpa) an underutilized crop with potentials for ameliorating food insecurity
    food crops of Africa showing promises in the amelioration of nutritional food insecurities are presently neglected and underutilized African yam bean AYB is one of such crops with tremendous nutritional potentials It belongs to the class Magnoliopsida Order Fabales Family Fabaceae Genus Sphenostylis It is a crop of immense value as food cash crop and medicine AYB is not uncommon in Central and Western Africa especially Southern Nigeria but the crop is gradually moving towards extinction It s potentiality has earned it a place among the range of many indigenous food crops of Africa which promises to ameliorate nutritional food insecurities Ironically despite all it s potentials AYB is presently a neglected and underutilized crop Although it is often stated that only a few staple crops produce the majority of the food supply but it is worth noting that the important contribution of many minor crop species cannot and should not be underestimated The problem of food insecurity and sustainability is a serious global concern hence this review highlights the potentials of African yam bean as one of the crops needed to be improved upon for ameliorating food insecurity Broader Impacts Log in to add this item to your schedule

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=1339 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany 2013 - Age estimates for Polygonaceae Juss. based on sequence data calibrated by fossils: implications for the historical biogeography of the amphi-Pacific <em>Muehlenbeckia </em>Meisn.
    age estimates for Polygonaceae by calibrating a Bayesian phylogenetic analysis using a relaxed molecular clock with fossil data Based on the age estimates we also develop hypotheses about the historical biogeography of the Southern Hemisphere group Muehlenbeckia We are interested in addressing whether vicariance or dispersal account for the diversification of Muehlenbeckia which has a so called Gondwanan distribution Eighty one species of Polygonaceae were analyzed with MrBayes to infer species relationships One nuclear nrITS and three chloroplast markers the trn L trn F spacer region mat K and ndh F genes were used The molecular data were also analyzed with Beast to estimate divergence times Seven calibration points including fossil pollen and a leaf fossil of Muehlenbeckia were used to infer node ages Results of the Beast analyses indicate an age of 110 9 exponential lognormal priors 118 7 uniform priors million years Myr with an uncertainty interval of 90 7 125 0 Myr for the stem age of Polygonaceae This age is older than previously thought Maastrichtian approximately 65 5 70 6 Myr Results for Eriogonoideae and Polygonoideae indicate a split around 97 8 105 5 78 2 122 5 Myr The estimated divergence time for Muehlenbeckia is 41 0 41 6 39 6 47 8 Myr and its crown clade is 20 5 22 3 14 2 33 5 Myr old Because the breakup of Gondwana occurred from 95 30 Myr ago and clades of Muehlenbeckia with disjunct distributions across e g New Zealand and South America are younger than when these landmasses broke apart long distance and maybe stepping stone dispersal rather than vicariance is likely the main driver for diversification within Muehlenbeckia This study is the first to give age estimates for clades of Polygonaceae and functions as a jumping off point for future studies

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=103 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany 2013 - A genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approach to map QTL affecting serpentine adaptation in <em>Caulanthus</em> <em>amplexicaulis</em> var. <em>barbarae</em> (Brassicaceae)
    have extremely low levels of essential plant nutrients e g N P Ca and very high to toxic levels of heavy metals e g Ni Distribution of serpentine soil is ubiquitous but patchy and outcrops are often home to many endemic plant species In California serpentine soils account for approximately 1 5 of the total land however this area is home to 13 of all endemic flora The Streptanthoid Complex Brassicaceae tribe Thelypodieae is a highly diverse group with approximately 60 taxa representing at least 6 genera many which are adapted to harsh or extreme environments The mechanisms by which Caulanthus amplexicaulis var barbarae CAB a serpentine endemic plant has not only adapted to but thrives in such soils are being investigated By comparing CAB to its non serpentine sister species Caulanthus amplexicaulis var amplexicaulis CAA the genetic and phenotypic variation that underlies adaptation to serpentine environments will be elucidated A novel highly simplified genotyping by sequencing GBS method using F2 progeny of crosses between the two ecologically distinct parents was employed to obtain high resolution map positions for QTL affecting serpentine related traits such as tolerance to high levels of nickel and low levels of calcium Preliminary QTL analysis

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=656 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany 2013 - Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation of <em>Valeriana officinalis</em> for the study of sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis
    as their primary pharmaceutical care Root extracts of plants in the genus Valeriana are principally used as an herbal sedative anxiolytic and spasmolytic agent We have developed a cell culture system for the study of secondary metabolism in Valeriana officinalis An agrobacterium mediated transformation system was developed for functional characterization of genes implicated in terpenoid biosynthesis Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105 harboring a binary vector was used for all transformation experiments Neomycin phosphotransferase nptII was used as a selectable marker Explants growing on selection were confirmed by PCR and a 20 transformation efficieny was echieved An intron containing beta glucuronidase driven by the constitutive CaMV35s promoter was employed as a reporter gene Beta glucuronidase activity was detected in 87 of PCR positive lines by GUS histochemical assay Farnesyldiphosphate synthase FDS a rate limiting step in sesquiterpenoid metabolism was characterized in yeast and subsequently in planta A dose dependent up regulation of FDS was detected in response to biotic and abiotic elicitation Cells treated with methyl jasmonate a known regulator of secondary metabolism displayed a 3 fold increase in FDS transcript over control GC MS analysis of MeJA treated cells quantified significant increases in sesquiterpenoid contents of the cultures An improved understanding

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=1324 (2016-02-01)
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