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  • Botany 2013 - Anchored Phylogenomics in the Angiosperms
    species tree inference New methods of this type have relied on variability of regions flanking either ultraconserved elements with 100 similarity or relatively conserved at least 65 similar stretches of the genome in animals as sources of phylogenetic data Since ultraconserved elements are fewer and mainly non syntenic in plants suggesting that they might not share a long evolutionary history with their flanking regions we adopt the more relaxed selection criterion Using genome alignments from model organisms and our own low coverage 20X genome sequencing from a strategic sampling of non model organisms we identified 1000s of potentially useful probe target sites in angiosperms We will present an overview of the bioinformatics pipeline for identifying the probe target sites the distribution of these target sites in the genome of a model plant and an assessment of variability of regions bordering the target sites in the context of utility for resolving deep vs shallow cladogenetic events This is a first step in the potentially transformative goal of producing a targeted sequence enrichment kit for angiosperms that facilitates future phylogenomics by removing the marker development step and maximizes data combinability across studies If time permits we will also present the first application

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=539 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany 2013 - Androecium Evolution in the Melastomeae (Melastomataceae)
    for over 70 species that encompass the morphological variation within the tribe Dimorphic anthers a condition also known as heteranthery have evolved several times within the tribe and this can take the form of size difference or size and shape difference When there is differentiation in form and size of the anthers then it can also be followed by color differentiation with the thecae in the larger anthers being pink purple or fuchsia and the anther appendages as well as the small anthers all being yellow Anther appendages and dimorphism have being lost in some high elevation groups i e Chaetolepis and allies The evolution of anther dimorphism and appendages in Monochetum seems to have a different developmental path as in the rest of the groups as appendages are all dorsal vs ventral in other Melastomeae and the large anthers are antipetalous vs antisepalous in all other Melastomeae Species without heteranthery usually have all the stamens arranged in a circle giving the flower an actinomorphic appearance while all groups with dimorphic anthers have the anthers flexed to one side of the flower at anthesis giving the flowers a zygomorphic appearance These differences in anther position may play a role in

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=648 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany 2013 - A new era for natural history collections: the impact of digitization and phylogenetics on analysis of biodiversity data
    rapid advances in computational methods for both tree building and tree using have eclipsed previous limits on the scope of phylogenetic investigations and phylogenetic systematics Natural history collections are the nexus where it all comes together specimens and their associated metadata are the ground truth for all biodiversity studies Specimens are essential DNA vouchers fundamental phylogenetic geographic evolutionary and ecological data points sole resolvers of taxonomic issues and primary evidence for global change and other human caused modifications of the environment I will present examples of new uses for specimen data drawing mainly from two places with an advanced state of herbarium digitization Australia and California but also from other efforts around the world The many uses of collection databases include important practical applications taking advantage of temporal aspects of collection data such as 1 Climate change modeling 2 Spatial ecology mapping historical habitats and landscapes 3 Tracking the introduction of pathogens and invasive species 4 Phenology estimates through time as well as scientific applications such as 1 Identification of under collected areas targeted exploration and other collection biases 2 Production of floras and identification tools 3 Discovery of previously undescribed taxa 4 Reconstructing assembly of communities 4 Biogeography and

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=768 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany 2013 - A new genus in the Hamamelidaceae from Vietnam based on molecular data, morphology, and cytology
    nuclear and two chloroplast genes cytology and micromorphology to represent a new genus from the Fanxipan area of endemism This genus is sister to Disanthus native to a small area of southeast China and Japan and thus an expansion of the previously monotypic Disanthoideae The presence of ballistically dispersed seeds from multi ovulate carpels in this genus may represent the first evolution of this character within the Hamamelidaceae as its

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=842 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany 2013 - A New Mustard Discovered from the West Desert Region of the North American Great Basin
    from the West Desert Region of the North American Great Basin The Brassicaceae is a large and diverse plant family with representatives found on a variety of substrates across the globe Systematic work over the last decade has elucidated relationships within and among the major tribes and provided an increased understanding of generic relationships Refinement of kinships however continues to be challenged by new placement of existing representatives as well as the discovery of previously undescribed members In 2012 the discovery of a prostrate slightly succulent plant growing on extremely alkaline limestone outcrops in North America s Great Basin Desert has again tested the mustard family phylogeny We present the results from ongoing morphological molecular cytological and field studies on the newly discovered plant providing a description and suggesting its placement in the evolution of Brassicaceae Along with its distinctive substrate low population numbers suggest the plant may represent yet another rare narrow endemic for which the Great Basin is noted Broader Impacts Log in to add this item to your schedule 1 Southern Utah University Biology 351 W University Boulevard Center for Health Molecular Sciences 213 Cedar City UT 84720 USA 2 Missouri Botanical Garden P O Box 299

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=647 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany 2013 - A new subgeneric classification for<em> Alternanthera </em>Forssk.<em> </em>(Gomphrenoideae, Amaranthaceae)<em> </em>based on molecular and morphological data
    Forssk Gomphrenoideae Amaranthaceae based on molecular and morphological data Alternanthera comprises around 80 100 species basically from the Neotropics Some other species distributes in Africa Asia and Australia Although many species are invasive weeds some of them are economically important as ornamentals or folk medicine in Mexico and Brazil A recent molecular study using nuclear ITS and chloroplast trnL F and rpl16 data suggested that the resulting gene tree is the frame of a possible scenario for a new classification below genus within the monophyletic Alternanthera In order to test this hypothesis a bigger sampling than those performed on previous studies was carried out including observations from field work and a herbarium revision of specimens from different herbaria NY MO P IEB S MEXU GE Parsimony analysis was conducted using morphological characters and new molecular data from chloroplast trnL F rpl16 and matk trnk and nuclear ITS DNA Preliminary results suggest that at least two subgenera can be recognized within Alternanthera based on floral morphology characters such as inflorescences form stigma and pistil shape pseudostaminodia margin and presence or absence of pseudostaminodia and geographic distribution Broader Impacts Log in to add this item to your schedule 1 Centro de Investigacion

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=463 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany 2013 - An expanded phylogeny of tribe Hibisceae (Malvaceae) reveals polyphyly of even more genera
    Orland 1 Abbott J Richard 2 Hanes Margaret 3 Mcdaniel Stuart 4 An expanded phylogeny of tribe Hibisceae Malvaceae reveals polyphyly of even more genera Tribe Hibisceae is infamous for its polyphyletic genus Hibiscus The tribe has over 750 species yet previous phylogenetic studies have not broadly sampled across the many genera in the tribe Although basic relationships in Hibsiceae have been understood for decades now we have increased taxon sampling to assess monophyly of currently recognized genera While Hibiscus is not monophyletic many of its infrageneric groupings are Likewise Kosteletzkya is not monophyletic when the Malagasy endemics are included Pavonia a genus of 250 pantropical species is highly polyphyletic Genera such as Abelmoschus Humbertiella Megistostegium Urena Wercklea are all monophyletic with current taxon sampling but are phylogenetically embedded within Hibiscus and or Pavonia Significant nomenclatural changes are necessary in order to accomplish generic monophyly although no changes are recommended yet Broader Impacts Log in to add this item to your schedule 1 University of Florida Florida Museum of Natural History Gainesville FL 32611 USA 2 Missouri Botanical Garden St Louis MO 63110 USA 3 Eastern Michigan University 441 Mark Jefferson Science Complex Ypsilanti MI 48197 USA 4 University of

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=314 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany 2013 - Angiosperm clades in the Potomac Group: what have we learned since Hickey & Doyle 1977?
    leaf characters at the same horizons Subsequent discoveries of fossil flowers in the Potomac and coeval deposits by Friis Crane Pedersen and others and increasingly robust molecular phylogenies of living angiosperms allow more precise recognition of extant clades using a molecular scaffold approach in which a morphological dataset of living and fossil angiosperms is analyzed with living taxa arranged as in current molecular trees Hickey Doyle compared early Potomac Aptian early Albian leaves and monosulcate pollen with magnoliids a paraphyletic group as then defined and monocots but flowers provide evidence for particular clades The basal ANITA grade is represented by Aptian Albian flowers Monetianthus Carpestella and whole plants Pluricarpellatia nested in crown group Nymphaeales early Potomac reniform leaves could belong to this clade Epidermal similarities of other early Potomac leaves to woody members of the ANITA grade are consistent with the presence of flowers assignable to Austrobaileyales Anacostia Diverse Aptian to Cenomanian mesofossils appear to represent both crown group Chloranthaceae Asteropollis plant related to Hedyosmum and stem relatives of Chloranthaceae and or Ceratophyllum Canrightia Zlatkocarpus Pennipollis plant possibly Appomattoxia Several Albian to early Cenomanian mesofossils belong to Magnoliidae in the new monophyletic sense including Virginianthus and Mauldinia Prisca in Laurales and Archaeanthus in Magnoliales The reticulate monosulcate pollen of Virginianthus suggests that more dispersed pollen of this type was produced by magnoliids than might be assumed based on living taxa The presence of monocots inferred from Aptian Liliacidites pollen and Acaciaephyllum is confirmed by araceous inflorescences In the middle late Albian the rise of tricolpate pollen and the first locally dominant angiosperm leaves mark the influx of near basal lines of eudicots not yet recognized as a clade in 1977 Associated flowers indicate that palmately lobed platanoids and Sapindopsis previously compared with rosids are both stem relatives of Platanus while

    Original URL path: http://www.2013.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=764 (2016-02-01)
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