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  • Botany & Mycology 2009 - Abstract Search
    not a SELECT 12 46 30 Abstract Detail MSA Cell and molecular biology Physiology Genetics Stolze Rybczynski J L 1 Cui Y 1 Fischer M W F 2 Money N P 1 Adaptation of the spore discharge mechanism in the Basidiomycota The ballistospore discharge mechanism is a defining characteristic of the Basidiomycota This extraordinary launch process is powered by the rapid movement of a drop of fluid called Buller s drop over the spore surface Ballistospore discharge is an example of a fast fungal movement and its analysis requires the use of ultra high speed video cameras Video data and estimates of energy usage during spore discharge reveal how the mechanism is adapted to limit discharge distance in species with gilled and poroid fruiting bodies and to maximize range in basidiomycetes that sporulate on exposed surfaces Discharge distance is determined by both spore size and the size of Buller s drop The size of Buller s drop is controlled by spore shape which means that seemingly minor changes in spore morphology exert major effects upon discharge distance Based on these observations we hypothesize that evolutionary modifications to fruiting body architecture including changes in gill separation and tube diameter must be

    Original URL path: http://2009.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=256 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany & Mycology 2009 - Abstract Search
    or Search Botany Mycology 2009 Home Login Send Email Message From Name From Email To M W F Fischer Subject Message Please type in the 5 characters between 0 and 9 and between A and F shown above and submit

    Original URL path: http://2009.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=contactbyemail&id=14045 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany & Mycology 2009 - Abstract Search
    Beartooth Butte Formation Wyoming The Beartooth Butte Formation has yielded Early Devonian Pragian Emsian 400 410 Myr old plant fossil assemblages from two localities in Wyoming These are the only extensive Early Devonian plant fossil assemblages known from western North America The Beartooth Butte Formation is a discontinuous unit that consists of dolomitic channel fill deposits interpreted as estuarine to fluvial sediments Plants are preserved as coalified compressions sometimes highly oxidized or impressions They form allochthonous assemblages characterized by a relatively high degree of fragmentation mixed with fish remains The few previous studies of the Beartooth Butte Formation flora have revealed considerable diversity including Drephanophycus Gosslingia Renalia Sawdonia Psilophyton Rebuchia and Hostinella but have not produced exhaustive taxonomic accounts An ongoing re examination of the Beartooth Butte Formation aimed at filling this gap expands the known diversity of the flora Among the most interesting findings are specimens with slender axes 1 mm some of which bear lateral stalked sporangia at irregular intervals while others bear terminal sporangia Numerous minute specimens 1 cm 2 consist of slender sometimes branching appendages radiating from a central area reminiscent of land plant gametophytes Also notable are a few axes 4 cm long bearing whorls

    Original URL path: http://2009.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=639 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany & Mycology 2009 - Abstract Search
    Section Serbet Rudolph 1 Taylor Thomas N 2 Taylor Edith L 2 Additional Observations on Buriadia from the Permian of Antarctica An extensive collection of impression compression remains including leafy shoots and ovules similar to specimens described as Buriadia is reported from the Permian Mt Gran site in Victoria Land Antarctica The specimens preserved as a thin layer of pyrite in a fined grained sediment show a number of morphological features like those reported from the type material Isolated ovules up to 3 0 mm wide and 4 0 mm long are roughly tear drop shape and possess a conspicuous two horned apex Reflected light microscopy suggests that the seeds have a relatively thick seed coat and in several specimens a prominent basal disk in the chalaza Leafy shoots are up to 7 cm long and characterized by helically arranged polymorphic leaves Leaves are typically 1 cm long and exhibit simple to multifid morphologies Several shoot systems include ovules along the axis suggesting possible attachment perhaps associated with subtending seed scale complex The occurrence of Buriadia in the Permian of Antarctica not only extends the geographic range of this enigmatic taxon but also provides additional information about the floral composition

    Original URL path: http://2009.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=737 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany & Mycology 2009 - Abstract Search
    Evolution Lucena L 1 Iturriaga T 1 Additions to the knowledge on the genus Xylaria from Canaima National Park Bolivar State Venezuela As part of a study on wood fungal sucession on fallen logs in the area of Luepa Gran Sabana Canaima National Park Bolivar State Venezuela between 880 and 1250 m species belonging to the Xylariaceae Ascomycota were collected by Iturriaga Urbina during six field trips to the area

    Original URL path: http://2009.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=879 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany & Mycology 2009 - Abstract Search
    Login Unable to connect to database 12 46 54 Unable to connect to database 12 46 54 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT 12 46 54 Abstract Detail Systematics Section Cabi Evren 1 Ba er Birol 2 Uzunhisarc kl Erkan 2 Yavru Ahter 2 A detailed palynological study on some taxa of the Alcea L and Althaea L genera in Turkey Pollen grains of 10 taxa from Alcea L and Althaea L genera Malvaceae were examined with LM Light Microscope and SEM Scanning Electron Microscope to assess whether pollen traits can be used to delimitate at generic and specific levels The results of the study showed that the pollen grains of Althaea genus are spheroidal pantoporate echinate which is characterized by having subglobose pattern at the base of echinae The pollen of Alcea are spheroidal pantoporate echinate and baculate Distances between pori are longer in Althaea pollens than pollens of Alcea The results of this study confirmed that whereas differences about pollen characteristics among the taxa are not functional in separating taxa at specific level especially in Alcea genus there have been strict differences based on pollen morphology between two closely related genera Log in to add this

    Original URL path: http://2009.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=687 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany & Mycology 2009 - Abstract Search
    the invasive plant Phragmites australis increased local genetic diversity and cross pollination can drive viable seed production Phragmites australis is rapidly invading wetlands across North America but little is known about how this plant spreads and what can explain its often exponential expansion We have documented high levels of genetic diversity within and among Phragmites patches in subestuaries of the Chesapeake Bay indicating the importance of sexual spread We also found highly variable seed viability but that seed viability was highest in wetlands with developed watersheds where plants are known to have higher foliar nitrogen levels than those in forested watersheds We hypothesized that nutrient availability may be important in Phragmites viable seed production However because of the high variation in seed viability other factors such as cross pollination may be important Here we report the results of a common garden study where we evaluated the importance of nutrients and cross pollination on viable seed production Over 2 years we grew plants from genetically distinct populations from 4 subestuaries of the Chesapeake Bay Plants were subjected to elevated or ambient nitrogen and phosphorous levels In year 2 flowering commenced and plants were either self or cross pollinated We dissected seeds from each inflorescence to determine percent seed viability We found a weak negative effect of elevated nutrients on seed viability however these same plants also produced more inflorescences per plant so the net effect is higher viable seed production per plant We also found a strong positive influence of cross pollination on seed viability cross pollinated plants produced 10x as many seeds We suggest that this positive effect of cross pollination on viable seed production provides a mechanism to explain the often exponential increase of Phragmites in the Chesapeake Bay As local levels of genetic diversity accumulate with individuals establishing

    Original URL path: http://2009.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=615 (2016-02-01)
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  • Botany & Mycology 2009 - Abstract Search
    Arizona Homolovi Ruins State Park was created to protect the ancient Hopi settlements that were migration points along a vast landscape on the Colorado plateau No floristic inventory for Homolovi Ruins State Park exists although inventories have been compiled for Petrified Forest National Park to the southeast and Wupatki National Monument to the west These lists from the surrounding areas provided a rough estimate of the number and species of common shrubs and grasses that might occur at Homolovi Ruins State Park and provide a starting point for a thorough floristic inventory Voucher specimens for annual and perennial herbs grasses and shrubs have been collected and identified While fall collection is complete spring and summer collections are ongoing and results should be considered preliminary Collected plants will be compiled into a species list for the park and voucher specimens will be placed in the Deaver Herbarium at Northern Arizona University The most abundant plant families present are Poaceae Chenopodiaceae and Asteraceae To date this study has documented 51 native species and three non natives species The most common non native species are Salsola tragus and Alhagi maurorum Results of the inventory will be used to construct an educational exhibit consisting

    Original URL path: http://2009.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=457 (2016-02-01)
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