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  • December 7 1941
    Pacific He was also a veteran of the Korean and Vietnam Wars In 1973 he retired from active duty as Commander in Chief of the United States Pacific Fleet This is his account of his experiences on 7 December 1941 Thank you That day of great tragedy and heroism I was having breakfast at our home about ten minutes from Pearl Harbor and getting reacquainted with my 15 month old son following a 58 day patrol off Wake Island The submarine force of the Pacific Fleet had been conducting defensive patrols off Wake and Midway Islands since early July At 0900 I was scheduled to take over command duty on USS Dolphin Just before 0800 I looked out toward Hickam Field from our hillside house and saw smoke coming from the hangers and many aircraft flying very low and fast in the vicinity There were also many bursts of anti aircraft fire visible over Hickam and Pearl Harbor We did not have our radio on at that time and I thought perhaps a plane had crashed or that the explosions came from the ammunition depot at West Lock My wife my son and I departed immediately to get me to my submarine moored at the Subase I turned on the radio at once and we heard of the attack We took the back road to the base which in a few minutes gave us an overview of the horrible sight of battleship row and the smoke and fire from burning planes and buildings Concerned for my wife and son I got out of the car on the highway leading to the Pearl Harbor Gate and told my wife I would call home as soon as I could I hitchhiked to the base about a mile away arriving about 0810 USS Dolphin s duty crew had manned all our machine guns and small arms and men were shooting at the enemy planes as they passed about 400 yards astern of our position at the pier None of us expected to hit anything but we led the planes like good duck hunters They were just too far away There were four submarines in port that morning which had arrived two to four days previously from patrols at Midway and Wake Two of the submarines were given credit along with a destroyer for shooting down one enemy plane These submarines were undergoing repair and refitting period with some of their machinery dismantled and some removed for ship work Few naval vessels are more vulnerable to air attack as a surfaced submarine with hatches open and electrical and water lines connected to the shore Yet the four submarines caught at their Pearl Harbor base gave a good account of themselves that day and in the following four and a half years of the war On that fateful Sunday the submarines of the Pacific Fleet were widely dispersed Of the 22 which comprised the force 16 were modern fleet type up to date submarines Six

    Original URL path: http://www.bowfin.org/december-7-1941 (2016-01-08)
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  • Korean War
    go off when the next train passed through the tunnel Despite caution enemy patrols discovered the Commandos and heavy gunfire broke out This action was heard by the PERCH off shore This prompted a young Naval surgeon in the submarine s wardroom to lay out his surgical equipment and set up an operating table He would be ready if needed PERCH s crew waited anxiously at their battle stations while the submarine maneuvered quietly around the mined bay under a clear moonlight sky The submarine was attempting to avoid enemy patrol boats that had been alerted by the gunfire ashore The entire area became a virtual hornets nest of activity The Commandos doggedly completed their mission successfully and now prepared to fight their way to the beach The PERCH waited anxiously Finally the Commandos reached the submarine and climbed wearily aboard However during the fierce gunfire one of their comrades P R Jones had been fatally injured the only U N casualty of the raid Later while PERCH was laying to in the Sea of Japan a solemn ceremony was held on her afterdeck On a stretcher covered by the British Union Jack rested the body of Commando Jones Around the body stood Jones comrades their jaws working nervously and their eyes avoiding each other Their officer in charge read a brief burial at sea service and the body was committed to the deep Eight Commando riflemen fired three volleys in a salute to their fallen comrade and two American destroyers each paid their respects with a full 21 gun salute As a result of this successful raid the PERCH crew and officers were awarded the Submarine Combat Insignia The USS PICKEREL SS 524 was the only other submarine to be awarded this insignia during the Korean War PICKEREL s award came from an operation involving United Nations personnel in a similar commando raid Korean War Submarines Following is a list of U S submarines known to have participated in the Korean War in order by hull number Bluegill SS 242 saw service Sabalo SS 302 two patrols Tilefish SS 307 two patrols according to the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships DANFS On 5 September 1950 Tilefish departed Pearl Harbor for Japan From 28 September 1950 through 24 March 1951 the submarine operated out of Japanese ports conducting patrols in Korean waters in support of the United Nations campaign in Korea She made reconnaissance patrols of La Perouse Strait to keep the Commander Naval Forces Far East informed of Soviet seaborne activity in that area Perch SS 313 one patrol in which she carried Royal Marines on a strike on a North Korean railroad war patrol combat pin awarded According to DANFS In September 1950 PERCH transported a force of British Commandos in a raid on the northeast coast of Korea west of Tanchon The target a train tunnel on the north south supply line was destroyed with the loss of one man who was buried at sea The

    Original URL path: http://www.bowfin.org/korean-war (2016-01-08)
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  • Subs in Pearl Harbor
    SS 199 Present Day Currently these submarines are homeported in Pearl Harbor Hawaii Commander Submarine Squadron 1 COMSUBRON One USS Bremerton SSN 698 USS Jacksonville SSN 699 USS La Jolla SSN 701 USS Key West SSN 722 USS Charlotte SSN 766 USS Greeneville SSN 772 USS Texas SSN 775 USS Hawaii SSN 776 USS North Carolina SSN 777 Commander Submarine Squadron 7 COMSUBRON Seven USS City of Corpus Christi SSN

    Original URL path: http://www.bowfin.org/submarine/faq?tmpl=component&print=1&page= (2016-01-08)
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  • Bowfin.org
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    Original URL path: http://www.bowfin.org/component/mailto/?tmpl=component&link=aHR0cDovL3d3dy5ib3dmaW4ub3JnL3N1YnMtaW4tcGVhcmwtaGFyYm9y (2016-01-08)
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  • December 7 1941
    veteran of the Korean and Vietnam Wars In 1973 he retired from active duty as Commander in Chief of the United States Pacific Fleet This is his account of his experiences on 7 December 1941 Thank you That day of great tragedy and heroism I was having breakfast at our home about ten minutes from Pearl Harbor and getting reacquainted with my 15 month old son following a 58 day patrol off Wake Island The submarine force of the Pacific Fleet had been conducting defensive patrols off Wake and Midway Islands since early July At 0900 I was scheduled to take over command duty on USS Dolphin Just before 0800 I looked out toward Hickam Field from our hillside house and saw smoke coming from the hangers and many aircraft flying very low and fast in the vicinity There were also many bursts of anti aircraft fire visible over Hickam and Pearl Harbor We did not have our radio on at that time and I thought perhaps a plane had crashed or that the explosions came from the ammunition depot at West Lock My wife my son and I departed immediately to get me to my submarine moored at the Subase I turned on the radio at once and we heard of the attack We took the back road to the base which in a few minutes gave us an overview of the horrible sight of battleship row and the smoke and fire from burning planes and buildings Concerned for my wife and son I got out of the car on the highway leading to the Pearl Harbor Gate and told my wife I would call home as soon as I could I hitchhiked to the base about a mile away arriving about 0810 USS Dolphin s duty crew had manned all our machine guns and small arms and men were shooting at the enemy planes as they passed about 400 yards astern of our position at the pier None of us expected to hit anything but we led the planes like good duck hunters They were just too far away There were four submarines in port that morning which had arrived two to four days previously from patrols at Midway and Wake Two of the submarines were given credit along with a destroyer for shooting down one enemy plane These submarines were undergoing repair and refitting period with some of their machinery dismantled and some removed for ship work Few naval vessels are more vulnerable to air attack as a surfaced submarine with hatches open and electrical and water lines connected to the shore Yet the four submarines caught at their Pearl Harbor base gave a good account of themselves that day and in the following four and a half years of the war On that fateful Sunday the submarines of the Pacific Fleet were widely dispersed Of the 22 which comprised the force 16 were modern fleet type up to date submarines Six others were many years older

    Original URL path: http://www.bowfin.org/submarine/36/115-december-7-1941 (2016-01-08)
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  • Systems Overview
    Bowfin Specs Subs in Pearl Harbor WWII Systems Parts Wishlist WWII Systems Systems Overview Torpedo Troubles Sonar Water Distillation Systems Overview Systems Overview Torpedo Troubles America entered World War II with inferior torpedoes that were often erratic ran deeper than they were set and exploded prematurely or not at all Sonar Sonar SO und N avigation A nd R anging is a vital part of a submarine s ability to detect track and attack the enemy Water Distillation Besides the necessity of fresh water for drinking cooking and washing World War II submarines needed distilled water for their battery cells Parts Wishlist Here is a listing of the most wanted parts and equipment for the restoration of the historic World War II submarine USS Bowfin Secrets of the Sub Victory At Cost Victory at a cost During World War II The United States Submarine Force encompassing less than 2 of the U S Navy s fleet inflicted destruction on Japanese maritime power U S submarines were responsible for sinking over 30 of the Japanese Navy including eight aircraft carriers one battleship and eleven cruisers More importantly the Submarine Force sank 2 400 Japanese merchant ships totaling 4 9 million tons

    Original URL path: http://www.bowfin.org/systems-overview (2016-01-08)
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  • Torpedo Troubles
    was inadequate in manufacturing and feeble in its supervision of Newport It was wanting in collegiality with the rest of the Navy and it failed to trust those fighting under the Pacific surface Robert Gannon Hellions of the Deep The Development of American Torpedoes in World War II Penn State Press University Park PA 1996 page 202 That desk bound staffers refused to listen to suggestions and criticisms from those they had sent into combat with this weapon seems in retrospect incomprehensibly stubborn and stupid The torpedo scandal of the U S submarine force in World War II was one of the worst in the history of any kind of warfare Clay Blair Jr Silent Victory The U S Submarine War Against Japan Bantam Books New York 1975 pages 216 and 879 Christie s submarines were having increased difficulty with prematures Bowfin whose record in sinking Japanese ships was outstanding had eight prematures in one patrol Nimitz sent a dispatch inquiring into the circumstances and Christie replied on 13 March 1944 that Bowfin s patrol was the end of a long effort to perfect the magnetic exploder and that no further experiment would be made by submarines on patrol After that Southwest Pacific submarines also inactivated their magnetic exploders W J Holmes Undersea Victory The Influence of Submarine Operations on the War in the Pacific Doubleday Company Garden City NY 1966 page 311 For further on line information please refer to Frederick J Milford s The Great Torpedo Scandal 1941 43 Part 2 of his series US NAVY TORPEDOES first published in THE SUBMARINE REVIEW a quarterly publication of the Naval Submarine League P O Box 1146 Annandale VA 22003 9146 Douglas A Shireman s U S Torpedo Troubles an article published in the February 1998 edition of WORLD WAR

    Original URL path: http://www.bowfin.org/torpedo-troubles (2016-01-08)
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  • Sonar
    easily recognized than those produced by supersonic gear The hydrophone in sonic gear is mounted topside When a sound wave hits the front of the hydrophone the long metal tube changes slightly in size This sets up an electric current in wires coiled around its wooden core Sound cannot hit the back of the tube very strongly because it is protected by a rubber baffle Hand operated and electrically controlled mechanisms turn the hydrophones in any desired direction JP is the Navy term for sonic listening gear The J means that it can be used for listening only The second letter P merely indicates the model Supersonic gear is superior for catching sounds used by escort vessels in searching for submarines and can be used to send out sounds to determine the range of a target Two supersonic hydrophone projectors the QB and the JK QC are mounted at the bottom of shafts which extend through the hull under the forward torpedo room Lowering these shafts puts the two projectors below the keel JK QC is the Navy term for one type of supersonic gear The JK half of the combination projector is for listening only the QC half can also be used for sending out sounds into the water QB designates the other type As indicated by the letter Q the QB projector can send out as well as receive sounds The JK QC combination projector is mounted portside The JK face is just like QB The QC face contains small nickel tubes which change size when a sound wave strikes this face Change in shape of the salt crystals or in the size of the metal tubes generates a small electric current in connecting cables which is strengthened and changed by the receiver amplifiers so that it is

    Original URL path: http://www.bowfin.org/sonar (2016-01-08)
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