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  • WCEP: 2004 Fall Daily Updates
    4 2004 Terrell County GA to Hamilton County Florida December 3 2004 Haralson to Terrell County GA December 2 2004 Walker to Haralson County GA November 27 to 30 Dec 1 2004 Walker County GA November 26 2004 Walker County GA November 19 to 25 2004 Meigs County TN November 18 2004 Cumberland to Meigs County TN November 17 2004 Adair County KY to Cumberland County TN November 16 2004 Washington to Adair County KY November 15 2004 Oldham to Washington County KY November 14 2004 Scott County IN to Oldham County KY November 13 2004 Jennings to Scott County IN November 9 to 12 2004 Jennings County IN November 8 2004 Morgan to Jennings County IN November 7 2004 Boone to Morgan County IN November 6 2004 Boone County IN November 5 2004 Kankakee Cty IL to Boone County IN November 1 thru 4 2004 Kankakee County IL November 1 thru 3 2004 Kankakee County IL October 31 2004 LaSalle to Kankakee County IL October 25 to 30 2004 LaSalle County IL October 24 2004 LaSalle County IL October 22 to 23 2004 Winnebago County IL October 21 2004 Green County WI to Winnebago County IL October 14 to

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/projectupdates/2004fall/index.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: 2003 Fall Updates
    completed the migration December 7 2003 Gilchrist County FL December 6 2003 Hamilton County FL December 5 2003 Terrell County GA December 4 2003 Terrell County GA December 3 2003 Terrell County GA December 2 2003 Terrell County GA December 1 2003 Terrell County GA November 30 2003 Gordon County GA November 26 29 2003 Meigs County TN November 25 2003 Meigs County TN November 21 24 2003 Cumberland County TN November 20 2003 Cumberland County TN November 15 19 2003 Adair County KY November 14 2003 Adair County KY November 13 2003 Washington County KY November 12 2003 Washington County KY November 11 2003 Washington County KY November 10 2003 Washington County KY November 9 2003 Oldham County KY November 8 2003 Oldham County KY November 7 2003 Jackson County IN November 1 6 2003 Morgan County IN October 29 31 2003 Boone County IN October 27 and 28 2003 Benton County IN October 26 2003 Kankakee County IL all 16 whooping cranes made the flight October 25 2003 La Salle County IL October 23 24 2003 Ogle County IL October 22 2003 Green County WI October 21 2003 Another day in Sauk County WI October 20 2003 Sauk

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/projectupdates/2003fall/index.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP Archives: 2002 Fall Migration
    November 25 2002 Pike County Georgia November 24 2002 Gordon County Georgia November 23 2002 A team divided Meigs County Tennessee and Gordon County Georgia November 22 2002 grounded in Meigs County Tennessee November 21 2002 grounded in Meigs County Tennessee November 20 2002 grounded in Meigs County Tennessee November 19 2002 grounded in Meigs County Tennessee November 18 2002 Meigs County Tennessee November 17 2002 grounded in Fentress Co Tennessee November 16 2002 grounded in Fentress Co Tennessee November 15 2002 grounded in Fentress Co Tennessee November 14 2002 Fentress County Tennessee November 13 2002 Adair County Kentucky November 12 2002 Washington County Kentucky November 11 2002 Jennings County Indiana November 10 2002 Hendricks and Morgan Counties Indiana November 9 2002 Hendricks and Morgan Counties Indiana November 8 2002 Hendricks and Morgan Counties Indiana November 7 2002 Flock splits into two groups Hendricks and Morgan Counties Indiana November 6 2002 Grounded Boone County Indiana November 5 2002 Grounded Boone County Indiana November 4 2002 Grounded Boone County Indiana November 3 2002 Boone County Indiana November 2 2002 Grounded in Benton County Indiana November 1 2002 Grounded in Indiana October 31 2002 Benton County Indiana October 30 2002 Kankakee County

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/projectupdates/2002flock/index.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: 2002 Spring Migration, Whooping Cranes
    2002 Spring Whooping Crane Migration Whooping cranes in Henry County Georgia WCEP Photo by Richard Urbanek U S Fish and Wildlife Service May 6 16 2002 May 4 2002 May 3 2002 April 28 2002 April 22 2002 April 20 2002 April 19 2002 April 18 2002 April 17 2002 April 16 2002 April 15 2002 April 14 2002 April 13 2002 April 11 2002 April 10 2002 Wondering what

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/projectupdates/2001flock/02north-upd.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: 2002 Whooping Crane Return Flight Q an As
    species These cranes and other birds like them are quite capable of foraging and finding their own suitable foods and should not learn to rely on humans to provide food Whooping cranes are omnivores and eat a variety of foods in the wild Insects and other invertebrates crabs crayfish etc small vertebrates rodents etc roots tubers and seeds are all important components of a whooping crane s diet Blue crabs in the cranes winter ecosystem are an especially important food source 10 How closely are we going to monitor the birds on the return migration Two people each equipped with radio signal tracking vehicles are ready to follow the birds on their entire spring migration If the flock splits into separate groups the two vehicles can track in different areas and an airplane is on standby to follow the cranes if ground tracking becomes difficult Two of the cranes will also be tracked by satellite telemetry These transmitters automatically report data directly to us so we can continue to track the birds even if contact with plane or ground crew is lost The birds will continue to be monitored this summer and during their next fall migration using the satellite and radio tracking equipment In all these cases the tracking personnel will monitor the birds from a distance and not intervene unless necessary 11 What are potential predators the birds may encounter along the route and what are the dangers they face Although efforts have been made to minimize mortality some will inevitably occur as captive reared birds adapt to the wild In the north wolves are known predators of adult Sandhill cranes and would be potential predators of adult whooping cranes as would coyotes and bald and golden eagles throughout the flyway During the rearing training southern migration and wintering phases of the project we have taken steps to reduce natural mortality from predators fluctuating food availability disease and wild feeding inexperience through threat management as well as vaccination gentle release supplemental feeding for a post release period and pre release conditioning This conditioning included teaching the birds the habit of roosting in standing water Predation by bobcats has been a significant source of mortality in Florida s non migratory flock and resulted in the loss of two birds in this year s migratory study flock and teaching this roosting behavior to young birds should help to reduce losses to wolves coyotes and bobcats Collision with power lines and fences are known hazards to wild whooping cranes We hope to reduce human caused mortality through information and education efforts directed at landowners and land users and through continual reviews and management without disruption of human activities in the summer and wintering areas 12 Will the cranes migrate as a group Until the cranes begin to pair bond with mates and raise their own young they may establish temporary bonds with flock mates and form bachelor cohorts They may stay together as one group or break up into smaller flocks

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/projectupdates/2002flock/QandASpringMigration.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: The 2001 Fall Migration
    whooping cranes back to eastern North America here Home What We Do Who We Are Conservation in Action Get Involved Newsroom Technical Database What To Do If You See Whooping Cranes Visit us on our Social Media sites Facebook Flickr YouTube Twitter The 2001 Fall Migration Migration began Ocober 17 completed on December 3 place cursor over circles for date and location of each migration stop Go Here for All

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/projectupdates/2001flock/2001fall-map.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership - Home Page
    the first time in 60 years These chicks were lost to predation Wisconsin was considered for a new population for several reasons Most importantly the Wisconsin flock will be separated from other wild flocks Additionally suitable habitat on federal state and private lands is available Wisconsin s long tradition of environmental commitment and public support increases the chances for success within the state Release site ivestigations were held in 1999 and selection was based on habitat analysis local community support and protection potential In September 1999 the Whooping Crane Recovery Team selected Necedah National Wildlife Refuge for a test release using sandhill cranes in 2000 Deemed a success in the early spring of 2001 the project paved the way for whooping crane releases beginning in the summer of 2001 Where do the Cranes for the Project Come From Three captive flocks produce cranes for reintroduction to the wild These captive flocks are located at the International Crane Foundation WI Patuxent Wildlife Research Center MD and the Calgary Zoo Canada How Will the Birds be Reintroduced This reintroduction project will require an estimated 10 to 15 year effort The cranes will be hatched from eggs in laid captivity then taken to the release site at the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge for acclimation to the wild A costumed parent will teach them to forage roost safely and avoid humans as well as other things crucial to their survival once they are released The birds will be taught to follow costumed trainer in an ultralight aircraft They will migrate using routes similar to wild sandhill cranes and eventually reach Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge in Florida where they will spend the winter The cranes will be monitored using radio and satellite telemetry equipment during the winter and as they migrate north unassisted the following spring What is the Goal The goal of this recovery project is a flock of 125 birds in Wisconsin by 2020 including 25 nesting pairs The Sandhill Crane Test Project Before trying to reintroduce the rare whooping cranes with this method the proposed techniques were tested using sandhill cranes The successful techniques developed during the sandhill study helped determine the methods that will be used for whooping crane releases During the first week of May 2000 eggs were collected from wild sandhill crane nests in Central Wisconsin They eggs were shipped to Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Maryland where they were incubated and hatched The chicks heard the sound of ultralight aircraft while still in their eggs When they were less than two weeks old they began to exercise by following the ultralight aircraft Their exposure to the plane continued daily until they were shipped back to the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge on June 30 for acclimation to the Wisconsin release site Flight training continued on refuge grasslands and wetlands until they were old enough to migrate south On October 3 after mastering the art of flying and following an ultralight the cranes made their way along the 1 250

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/projectupdates/2001flock/proj-facts.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: Video From the Whooping Crane Migration Team
    Get Involved Newsroom Technical Database What To Do If You See Whooping Cranes Visit us on our Social Media sites Facebook Flickr YouTube Twitter Project Design Video From the Whooping Crane Migration Team photo by David Umberger Nov 10 and 11 2001 video RealPlayer of how the migration team looked for and found the whooping crane that left the migrating flock courtesy of Sunshine Productions HC Oct 31 2001 video

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/video.html (2016-05-02)
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