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  • WCEP Statement on the Death of Crane 15-06
    at the Halpata Tastanaki Preserve in Marion County Florida He had not been observed during an aerial search on April 21 and his radio signal was not detected during a ground search of the area on April 23 Veterinarians at the University of Florida s Laboratory of Wildlife Disease Research will perform a necropsy to determine the cause of death The 17 other juvenile whooping cranes of the Class of

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/2007_15-06mortality.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: Whooping Crane Unusual Mortality Event
    February 1 2007 intensified after midnight and into the early morning hours of February 2 They left behind a trail of death and destruction that included severe property damage and the loss of 20 human lives In addition 17 of 18 reintroduced endangered whooping cranes were killed at a remote pen site on the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge in Citrus County as a result of the storms These birds represented most of the ultralight led Class of 2006 part of an historic effort to reintroduce a migratory flock of whooping cranes to eastern North America Until these storms the project has seen great success and low mortality rates over the past six years The loss of almost an entire year s cohort of birds was a significant setback for the project and a blow to the substantial investment of personnel and funding that it took to raise train and lead them on their first migration As a result the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership WCEP has undertaken an intensive review of the mortality event with the goal of identifying and taking actions designed to minimize the damage done by such catastrophic storms in the future The WCEP Project Direction Team and

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/feb2007mortality_rpt.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership - Home Page
    17 juvenile whooping cranes that died during violent storms on Feb 1 2 were stunned by a lightning strike of sufficient strength to cause them to collapse in rising water and drown in their top netted pen at Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge Necropsy results coupled with weather data from that night support this hypothesis Two birds were examined by veterinarians at the Laboratory of Wildlife Disease Research University of Florida

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/2006classmortality.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: Update on Review of 2007 Unusual Mortality Event
    events leading up to the loss of 17 whooping cranes at the Chassahowitzka NWR pen site on February 1 as the result of the severe overnight storms that swept through the area All facts surrounding the mortality including weather reports tidal information lightning strike data necropsy results and firsthand site reports from personnel have been compiled for the team s review Two half day telephone conference call meetings have been

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/2006mortalities.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: June 23, 2006 - - First Wild Whooping Crane Chicks Hatch in the Midwest in Over 100 Years
    sustain itself for generations to come said Kelley Tucker co chair of the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership This is a long awaited moment said Signe Holtz director of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Bureau of Endangered Resources the success of this effort sets a goal for endangered species recovery efforts everywhere The partnership of public private and government organizations that has made this possible shows what can be done when we all pull together with a common goal in sight These chicks have a long and dangerous road ahead of them but with luck we ll see them wing south with their parents this fall In May another first occurred when two whooping crane chicks from a nest in the wild hatched in captivity WCEP biologists removed the two eggs from a nest at the Necedah NWR after their parents wandered away from the newly laid eggs for a long period of time The chicks were hatched at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel Maryland They will join the crane Class of 2006 which will learn the migration route between Necedah NWR and Chassahowitzka NWR in Florida this fall by following Operation Migration s ultralight aircraft Biologists from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service have also begun releasing additional chicks into the company of older birds in the fall at Necedah NWR These chicks will learn the migration route from adult whooping cranes or sandhill cranes WCEP is using this direct autumn release technique to complement the known success of the ultralight led migrations Chicks for direct autumn release will be reared in the field and released with older birds after fledging or developing their flight feathers This method of reintroduction has been extensively tested with sandhill cranes and proven successful Four whooping cranes were released by this method in the fall of 2005 WCEP asks anyone who encounters whooping cranes in the wild to please give them the respect and distance they need to remain wild Do not approach birds on foot within 600 feet and try to remain in your vehicle Do not approach cranes in a vehicle within 600 feet or if on a public road within 300 feet Also please remain concealed and do not speak loudly enough that the birds can hear you Finally do not trespass on private property in an attempt to view whooping cranes In 2001 Operation Migration s pilots first led whooping crane chicks conditioned to follow their ultralight surrogates south from Necedah NWR to Chassahowitzka NWR Each subsequent year WCEP biologists and pilots have conditioned and guided additional groups of juvenile cranes to Chassahowitzka NWR Project staff from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service track and monitor north and southbound cranes in an effort to learn as much as possible about their unassisted migrations and the habitat choices they make along the way ICF and FWS biologists along with Wisconsin DNR biologists and continue to monitor

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2006/nr-062306.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP - 2006 Photos of First Wild Whooping Crane Chicks
    Crane Migratory Reintroduction photos are provided at no costs for use by news organizations in the production of video reports and news features Photos identified as being provided by WCEP private partners are NOT in the public domain These photos are provided for the express use outlined above and for use by WCEP partners Commercial use of the privately owned photos requires the express written consent of the respective organization

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/projectupdates/2006chicks/hig-r-images06.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: October 2003 Update
    National Wildlife Refuge which is the Core Reintroduction Area One whooping crane is at Horicon NWR Three cranes are near the Mississippi River in Iowa and Illinois The whereabouts of one whooping crane is unknown Activities of 2001 cranes No 1 Remained at Necedah NWR usually roosted with two adult sandhills and their chick and sometimes with larger numbers of sandhills No 2 Returned to Necedah NWR October 23 N o 5 Roosting in central Wisconsin wetlands with Nos 4 and 18 from 2002 No 6 Has not been found since leaving Necedah NWR on May 10 At that timehis transmitter had a broken antenna so its operation is at best poor No 7 Last reported Oct 11 at Horicon NWR Vegetation and lack of functional transmitter make it hard to track her Activities of 2002 cranes No 1 Remained with a staging flock of about 200 sandhill cranes in central Wisconsin No 2 Associated with sandhills in central Wisconsin along with No 13 No 3 Remained in northeastern Iowa with No 15 No 4 Roosted in central Wisconsin wetlands along with No 5 from 2001 and No 18 from 2002 No 5 At Necedah NWR with Nos 8 16 and 17 from 2002 and No 2 from 2001 No 8 Remained at Necedah with Nos 5 16 17 and No 2 from 2001 No 9 Foraged with sandhill cranes in central Wisconsin on October 19 on the 20th she moved to a cranberry reservoir with a small number of sandhills and then returned to roost on Necedah NWR No 11 Roosting on Necedah NWR with No 12 No 12 Roosting on Necedah NWR with No 11 No 13 Associated with sandhills in central Wisconsin along with No 2 No 14 Remained on Upper Mississippi National Wildlife and Fish Refuge

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/projectupdates/2003fall/01-02fl-oct-up.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: October 26 - Nov. 1, 2003October 26 - Nov. 1, 2003
    cranes are near the Mississippi River in Iowa and Illinois Activities of 2001 cranes No 1 Remained at Necedah NWR sometimes with other whooping cranes but most often alone or with sandhills No 2 Remained at Necedah NWR with a large group of sandhill cranes No 5 Roosting in central Wisconsin wetlands with Nos 4 and 18 from 2002 No 6 Confirmed sighting in a staging flock of some 400 sandhill cranes in central Wisconsin No 7 Last reported Oct 11 at Horicon NWR Vegetation and lack of functional transmitter make it hard to track her Activities of 2002 cranes No 1 Remained with a staging flock of about 200 sandhill cranes in central Wisconsin No 2 Associated with sandhills in central Wisconsin along with No 13 No 3 Remained in northeastern Iowa with No 15 No 4 Roosted in central Wisconsin wetlands along with No 5 from 2001 and No 18 from 2002 No 5 At Necedah NWR with Nos 8 16 and 17 from 2002 and No 2 from 2001 No 8 Remained at Necedah with Nos 5 16 17 and No 2 from 2001 No 9 Foraged with sandhill cranes in central Wisconsin on October 19 on

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/projectupdates/2003fall/01-02fl-nov1-up.html (2016-05-02)
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