archive-org.com » ORG » B » BRINGBACKTHECRANES.ORG

Total: 392

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • WCEP News Release February 1, 2011: Five-Year Strategic Plan
    of nesting failures through management of released and wild hatched birds while continuing to promote growth of the population through releases of captive reared birds Key to this effort will be identifying the factors that are contributing to the nest failure and identifying management actions that address those factors and promote successful reproduction This effort is the highest priority of the partnership WCEP researchers are currently conducting an analysis to determine the most suitable breeding habitat to target for future whooping crane releases By April 2011 WCEP tentatively plans to identify specific additional release sites for whooping cranes and to seek landowner approval for releases in summer 2011 Since whooping cranes have been absent from the upper Midwest for over 120 years WCEP plans to continue studying how reintroduced whooping cranes use the habitats they encounter following release These data will refine understanding of the habitat requirements for whooping cranes in this region Necedah National Wildlife Refuge will continue to play an important role in the reintroduction including enabling the research identified and possibly to raise cranes for release at new introduction sites or to experiment with new release techniques Whooping cranes reintroduced to the Eastern migratory flock are hatched at the U S Geological Survey s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel MD and at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo WI To prepare captive young cranes for survival in the wild chicks are raised by biologists under a strict isolation protocol meaning that handlers adhere to a no talking rule and wear costumes designed to mask the human form In 2001 Operation Migration s pilots led the first whooping crane chicks conditioned to follow their ultralight aircraft south from Necedah NWR to Chassahowitzka NWR in Florida Each subsequent year WCEP biologists and pilots have conditioned and guided additional groups of juvenile cranes to Florida Having been shown the migration route south in the fall the young birds are able to migrate north on their own in the spring and in subsequent years continue to migrate on their own In 2008 St Marks NWR along Florida s Gulf Coast was added as an additional wintering site for the juvenile cranes In the spring and fall project staff from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service track and monitor the released cranes in an effort to learn as much as possible about their unassisted journeys and the habitat choices cranes make both during migration and on their summering and wintering grounds Most of the whooping cranes released in previous years spend the summer in central Wisconsin as well as other public and private lands Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s Today there are only about 570 birds in existence approximately 400 of them in the wild There is one remaining wild population of about 250 whooping cranes that nest at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta Canada and winters at Aransas NWR on the Texas Gulf Coast A non

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2011/nr01february2011.html (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • WCEP:USFWS News Release January 5, 2011
    Twitter NEWS RELEASE from the U S FISH WILDLIFE SERVICE Wildlife Agencies Investigating the Deaths of Three Whooping Cranes in South Georgia FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE January 5 2011 Media contacts USFWS Tom MacKenzie tom mackenzie fws gov 404 679 7291 Georgia DNR Rick Lavender rick lavender dnr state ga us 770 918 6787 The U S Fish and Wildlife Service and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources are investigating the suspicious deaths of three whooping cranes in south Georgia The cranes were found and reported by hunters in Calhoun County just west of Albany Ga on Dec 30 2010 The landowner reported the cranes had been in the area for a few weeks before they found them dead just before New Year s Eve Necropsies are expected to be completed in about two weeks The cranes are part of the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership effort to reintroduce whooping cranes into the eastern United States These three cranes were released in October 2010 with seven other first year birds in Wisconsin as part of the Direct Autumn Release program They generally follow other older whooping cranes and sometime sandhill cranes during the fall migration to find suitable wintering habitat They were

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2011/nr05January2011.html (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • WCEP News Release September 1, 2010 Whooping Crane Chicks Hatch at Necedah NWR
    at Necedah NWR and released them in the company of older cranes from whom the young birds will learn the migration route The DAR and ultralight led chicks this year are joining two wild hatched chicks in the 2010 cohort Whooping cranes that take part in the ultralight and DAR reintroductions are hatched at the U S Geological Survey s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel Md and at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo Wis Chicks are raised under a strict isolation protocol and to ensure the birds remain wild handlers adhere to a no talking rule and wear costumes designed to mask the human form In 2001 Operation Migration s pilots led the first whooping crane chicks conditioned to follow their ultralight aircraft surrogates south from Necedah NWR to Chassahowitzka NWR in Florida Each subsequent year WCEP biologists and pilots have conditioned and guided additional groups of juvenile cranes to Florida Having been shown the way once the young birds initiate their return migration in the spring and in subsequent years continue to migrate on their own In 2008 St Marks NWR along Florida s Gulf Coast was added as an additional wintering site for the juvenile cranes In the spring and fall project staff from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service track and monitor the released cranes in an effort to learn as much as possible about their unassisted journeys and the habitat choices they make both along the way and on their summering and wintering grounds Most of the whooping cranes released in previous years spend the summer in central Wisconsin where they use areas on or near Necedah NWR as well as other public and private lands Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s Today

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2010/nr16Dec2010.html (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • WCEP News Release September 1, 2010 Whooping Crane Chicks Hatch at Necedah NWR
    the result of renesting Earlier this spring nine breeding pairs of whooping cranes built nests and laid eggs but all nine pairs abandoned those first nests The nest abandonments earlier this spring are similar to what has been observed in previous years WCEP is investigating the cause of the abandonments through analysis of data collected throughout the nesting period on crane behavior and black fly abundance and distribution In addition to the two wild chicks 13 whooping crane chicks are being conditioned to follow ultralight aircraft by a field team from Operation Migration and the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center This fall Operation Migration will guide the young cranes on their first southward migration from Necedah NWR to Florida the cranes winter home An additional 11 chicks will be migrating south as part of WCEP s Direct Autumn Release DAR project Biologists from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service are currently rearing the whooping crane chicks at Necedah NWR The chicks will be released this fall in the company of older cranes from whom the young birds learn the migration route This is the sixth year WCEP has used this DAR method In the spring and fall project staff from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service track and monitor the released cranes in an effort to learn as much as possible about their unassisted journeys and the habitat choices they make both along the way and on their summering and wintering grounds Most of the whooping cranes released in previous years spend the summer in central Wisconsin where they use areas on or near Necedah NWR as well as other public and private lands Whooping cranes that take part in the ultralight and Direct Autumn Release reintroductions are hatched at the U S Geological Survey s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel Md and at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo Wis Chicks are raised under a strict isolation protocol and to ensure the birds remain wild handlers adhere to a no talking rule and wear costumes designed to mask the human form In the spring and fall project staff from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service track and monitor the released cranes in an effort to learn as much as possible about their unassisted journeys and the habitat choices they make both along the way and on their summering and wintering grounds Most of the whooping cranes released in previous years spend the summer in central Wisconsin where they use areas on or near Necedah NWR as well as other public and private lands Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s Today there are only about 550 birds in existence approximately 400 of them in the wild Aside from the 96 WCEP birds the only other migrating population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta Canada and winters at Aransas NWR on the

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2010/nr01Sept2010.html (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • WCEP News Release October 29, 2010 Whooping Crane Chicks Hatch at Necedah NWR
    program provides WCEP with an additional opportunity to increase and strengthen the eastern migratory whooping crane population Biologists from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service are tracking the released cranes using radio telemetry picking up radio signals emitted from leg transmitters on the birds In addition to the 11 DAR birds 11 whooping cranes are being led south by project partner Operation Migration s ultralight aircraft The ultralight led birds are currently in Winnebago County Illinois The ultralight led and DAR chicks this year are joining two wild hatched chicks in the 2010 cohort Seven chicks initially hatched this year in the wild the largest number to hatch in WCEP project history Wild hatched chicks face a precarious existence in the first weeks of their lives and natural loss of chicks due to predation is common The survival rate for WCEP with these two chicks is within the range of survival rates for wild sandhill crane chicks in south central Wisconsin currently being studied by the International Crane Foundation In 2001 Operation Migration s pilots led the first whooping crane chicks conditioned to follow their ultralight aircraft surrogates south from Necedah NWR to Chassahowitzka NWR in Florida Each subsequent year WCEP biologists and pilots have conditioned and guided additional groups of juvenile cranes to Florida Having been shown the way once the young birds initiate their return migration in the spring and in subsequent years continue to migrate on their own In 2008 St Marks NWR along Florida s Gulf Coast was added as an additional wintering site for the juvenile cranes Whooping cranes that take part in the ultralight and DAR reintroductions are hatched at the U S Geological Survey s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel Md and at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo Wis Chicks are raised under a strict isolation protocol and to ensure the birds remain wild handlers adhere to a no talking rule and wear costumes designed to mask the human form In the spring and fall project staff from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service track and monitor the released cranes in an effort to learn as much as possible about their unassisted journeys and the habitat choices they make both along the way and on their summering and wintering grounds Most of the whooping cranes released in previous years spend the summer in central Wisconsin where they use areas on or near Necedah NWR as well as other public and private lands Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s Today there are only about 570 birds in existence approximately 400 of them in the wild Aside from the 107 released WCEP birds the only other migrating population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta Canada and winters at Aransas NWR on the Texas Gulf Coast A non migrating flock of approximately 25 birds lives year round in the central Florida

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2010/nr29Oct2010.html (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • WCEP News Release October 11, 2010: Tenth Group of Endangered Whooping Cranes Depart on Ultralight-guided Flight to Florida
    and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service reared 11 whooping cranes at Necedah NWR The birds will be released later this fall in the company of older cranes from whom the young birds will learn the migration route This is the sixth year WCEP has used this Direct Autumn Release DAR method The ultralight led and DAR chicks are this year joining two wild hatched chicks in the 2010 cohort Seven chicks initially hatched this year in the wild the largest number to hatch in WCEP project history Wild hatched chicks face a precarious existence in the first weeks of their lives and natural loss of chicks due to predation is common The survival rate for WCEP with these two chicks is within the range of survival rates for wild sandhill crane chicks in south central Wisconsin currently being studied by the International Crane Foundation The two wild whooping crane chicks are the result of renesting Earlier this spring nine breeding pairs of whooping cranes built nests and laid eggs but all nine pairs abandoned those first nests The nest abandonments earlier this spring are similar to what has been observed in previous years WCEP is investigating the cause of the abandonments through analysis of data collected throughout the nesting period on crane behavior and black fly abundance and distribution In 2001 Operation Migration s pilots led the first whooping crane chicks conditioned to follow their ultralight aircraft surrogates south from Necedah NWR to Chassahowitzka NWR in Florida Each subsequent year WCEP biologists and pilots have conditioned and guided additional groups of juvenile cranes to Florida Having been shown the way once the young birds initiate their return migration in the spring and in subsequent years continue to migrate on their own In 2008 St Marks NWR along Florida s Gulf Coast was added as an additional wintering site for the juvenile cranes Whooping cranes that take part in the ultralight and Direct Autumn Release reintroductions are hatched at the U S Geological Survey s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel Md and at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo Wis Chicks are raised under a strict isolation protocol and to ensure the birds remain wild handlers adhere to a no talking rule and wear costumes designed to mask the human form In the spring and fall project staff from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service track and monitor the released cranes in an effort to learn as much as possible about their unassisted journeys and the habitat choices they make both along the way and on their summering and wintering grounds Most of the whooping cranes released in previous years spend the summer in central Wisconsin where they use areas on or near Necedah NWR as well as other public and private lands Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s Today there are only about 570 birds in existence approximately 400 of them in the wild Aside from

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2010/nr11October2010.html (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • WCEP: Media Advisory June15, 2010
    year with the successful hatching of whooping crane chicks into the wild Three late season nests and four renests have left us with six whooping crane chicks on and around Necedah National Wildlife Refuge NWR One of the chicks came from an egg produced by the captive flock at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center The egg was swapped into a nest which contained two infertile eggs The chick hatched the next day and is still doing well Another wild hatched pair of chicks represents a project milestone the first chick hatched by a DAR Direct Autumn Release bird Biologists hope to see many more chicks hatched by DAR parents as the majority of DAR birds begin to reach breeding age Editor s note Medium res photos of the crane chicks and adult birds are available on request Whooping cranes are long lived birds that may start nesting attempts at three to five years of age and can continue hatching eggs and rearing chicks past the age of 30 Since 2001 WCEP project partner Operation Migration s pilots have led whooping crane chicks conditioned to follow their ultralight aircraft surrogates south from Necedah NWR to Chassahowitzka NWR and since 2008 to St Marks NWR in Florida Having been shown the way once the young birds initiate their return migration in the spring and in subsequent years continue to migrate on their own In addition to the ultralight led birds biologists from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service rear whooping crane chicks at Necedah NWR and release them in the company of older cranes from whom the young birds learn the migration route This is the sixth year WCEP has used this Direct Autumn Release method Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership founding members are the International Crane

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2010/ma15June2010.html (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive

  • WCEP:USFWS News Release December 9, 2009
    stands at up to 10 000 The citizen who asked to remain anonymous expressed sadness and frustration with the loss of the crane and said that the offer is an effort to help wildlife law enforcement officers find the perpetrator The U S Fish and Wildlife Service is offering 2 500 for information leading to an arrest and conviction On Dec 15 Defenders of Wildlife and the Indiana Turn in a Poacher or a Polluter Program TIP pledged 2 500 each toward the reward Wildlife law enforcement agents with the Service and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources are investigating the shooting of the crane The crane was last observed by an International Crane Foundation staff member on Saturday Nov 28 An ICF volunteer found the carcass on and Tuesday Dec 1 along West County Road 310 North just west of North County Road 225 West The crane was identified by a leg band and determined to be the seven year old mother of Wild 1 the only whooping crane chick successfully hatched in 2006 and migrated from captivity There are approximately 500 whooping cranes left in the world The crane and its mate were among 19 whooping cranes migrating from their summer grounds in Wisconsin to their wintering grounds in Florida Observations reported by the public play a key role in solving wildlife crime according to U S Fish and Wildlife Service Special Agent Buddy Shapp People who live in an area notice details that can tell us a lot Shapp said They sometimes see something or hear something that strikes them as unusual but not necessarily criminal People might not realize that their observation is significant Anyone with information should call the Indiana Department of Natural Resources 24 hour hotline at 1 800 TIP IDNR 800 847 4367

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2009/nrFWS18December2009.html (2016-05-02)
    Open archived version from archive



  •