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  • WCEP: Wild Whooping Cranes Returning to Wisconsin for Summer Season
    the summer in central Wisconsin where they use areas on or near the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge as well as state and private lands For more than 100 years the call of the whooper was absent in Wisconsin said Signe Holtz director of the Bureau of Endangered Resources at the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources but now thanks to the dedication and generosity of project partners businesses and individuals we have a chance to hear that call again in the skies and over the rivers and wetlands of Wisconsin The past year saw great success as the project s first wild hatched chick survived to successfully migrate south and the Wisconsin Natural Resources Board unanimously approved the Wisconsin Whooping Crane Management Plan There also was sadness at losing birds to storms on their winter range But like the return of spring the resilience of the partnership and the birds themselves continue to take this effort forward Holtz said In 2001 Operation Migration s pilots led the first whooping crane chicks conditioned to follow their ultralight surrogates south from Necedah NWR to Chassahowitzka NWR Each subsequent year WCEP biologists and pilots have conditioned and guided additional groups of juvenile cranes to Chassahowitzka In addition to the ultralight led birds four cranes made their first southward migration this fall as part of WCEP s Direct Autumn Release program Biologists from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service reared the four cranes at Necedah NWR and released them in the company of older cranes from whom the young birds would learn the migration route This is the second year WCEP has used the Direct Autumn Release method which supplements the success of the ultralight migrations The four 2006 Direct Autumn Release birds arrived at their wintering grounds in Florida on Dec 8 The whooping crane chicks that take part in the reintroduction project are hatched at the U S Geological Survey s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel Md There the young cranes are introduced to ultralight aircraft and raised in isolation from humans To ensure the impressionable cranes remain wild project biologists and pilots adhere to a strict no talking rule broadcast recorded crane calls and wear costumes designed to mask the human form whenever they are around the cranes New classes of cranes are brought to Necedah NWR each June to begin a summer of conditioning behind the ultralights to prepare them for their fall migration Pilots lead the birds on gradually longer training flights at the refuge throughout the summer until the young cranes are deemed ready to follow the aircraft along the migration route Project staff from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service track and monitor southbound cranes in an effort to learn as much as possible about their unassisted migrations and the habitat choices they make along the way The birds are monitored during the winter in Florida and tracked as they make their way north in

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2007/nr-031607.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: Why are the WCEP whooping cranes kept in the pen at the winter release site?
    smaller pen is used to house the juvenile whooping cranes when older whooping cranes from previous years releases are present at the pensite If the juvenile cranes are not housed in the smaller pen while the older birds are present the older birds are often aggressive to the younger ones keeping them from the feeders and occasionally attacking them This aggression has forced younger birds out of the safety of the pen making them vulnerable to bobcat predation The older whooping cranes will only stay at the pensite as long as they have access to the feeders When these older cranes show up we remove the feeders from the larger pen and place them under the top netted pen The juveniles are housed in this top netted pen with access to the food until the older cranes disperse inland where foraging is easier The Chassahowitzka NWR pensite is located approximately five miles from the mainland and accessible only by airboat This remote location is in an area of the refuge closed to the public to maintain the strict isolation rearing protocol adhered to on this project so the birds will not become accustomed to people and will remain wild To ensure the birds don t become too accustomed to the costumed personnel we strictly limit our contact with the birds These precautions are essential to the success of the release during this winter period the birds are gradually transitioning to life in the wild Project staff travel roundtrip via airboat twice a day out to the pensite area To keep the birds from seeing or hearing the airboat personnel dock the airboat and then walk in to the actual pensite It is a challenging hike navigating a narrow planked walkway around deep mud and water holes The staff monitors the

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2007/stmnt-021307.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: One Endangered Juvenile Whooping Crane Discovered Alive in Florida
    been found Project biologists with the International Crane Foundation picked up the radio signal of crane 15 06 on Saturday afternoon near the pensite at the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge where the other birds perished in the storm They lost the signal briefly before picking it up again on Sunday tracking the young bird to an area in Citrus County some miles away from the pensite The juvenile crane was observed from the air in good remote habitat with two sandhill cranes Number 15 06 is in the same area with three whooping cranes from the Class of 2005 During the last leg of the ultralight led migration last fall crane 15 06 dropped out but was found nearby two days later and brought to the pensite with his flockmates Finding 15 06 alive represents a ray of light during an otherwise dark time for whooping crane recovery said John Christian co chair of the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership While we are still recovering from the initial shock of the loss of so many other young birds this latest development demonstrates the resilience of this particular crane and our partnership will bounce back as well Seventeen juvenile whooping cranes died

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2007/nr-020407.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: After Record-Breaking Ultralight-led Journey,
    the reintroduced eastern migratory population Hatched May 7 at the U S Geological Survey s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel Md 2 06 s parents are whooping cranes 13 and 18 from the ultralight led Class of 2002 When these two cranes abandoned their nest containing an egg biologists picked up the wild egg and rushed it to an incubator to hatch in captivity The eastern migratory population of whooping cranes also includes the first crane chick to hatch in the wild in the Midwest in more than a century This wild whooping crane chick hatched June 22 at Necedah NWR This chick migrated south with its parents arriving at Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge on Dec 9 In addition to the 18 ultralight led birds of the Class of 2006 four cranes made their first southward migration this fall as part of WCEP s Direct Autumn Release program Biologists from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service reared the four cranes at Necedah NWR and released them in the company of older cranes in hopes that the young birds would learn the migration route This is the second year WCEP used the Direct Autumn Release method which supplements the success of the ultralight migrations The four 2006 Direct Autumn Release birds arrived at their wintering grounds in Florida on Dec 8 In 2001 Operation Migration s pilots led the first whooping crane chicks conditioned to follow their ultralight surrogates south from Necedah NWR to Chassahowitzka NWR Each subsequent year WCEP biologists and pilots have conditioned and guided additional groups of juvenile cranes to Chassahowitzka The whooping crane chicks that take part in the reintroduction project are hatched at the U S Geological Survey s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel Md There the young cranes are introduced to ultralight aircraft and raised in isolation from humans To ensure the impressionable cranes remain wild project biologists and pilots adhere to a strict no talking rule broadcast recorded crane calls and wear costumes designed to mask the human form whenever they are around the cranes New classes of cranes are brought to Necedah NWR each June to begin a summer of conditioning behind the ultralights to prepare them for their fall migration Pilots lead the birds on gradually longer training flights at the refuge throughout the summer until the young cranes are deemed ready to follow the aircraft along the migration route Most graduated classes of whoopers spend the summer in central Wisconsin where they use areas on or near the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge as well as various state and private lands Reintroduced whooping cranes have also spent time in Minnesota Iowa Illinois Michigan and other states Project staff from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service track and monitor southbound cranes in an effort to learn as much as possible about their unassisted migrations and the habitat choices they make along the way The birds are monitored during the

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2006/nr-121906.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: Wild Whooping Cranes Arrive in Florida
    a diverse partnership and what we have accomplished to date said Jim Hook president of the International Crane Foundation There are now 66 migratory whooping cranes in the wild in eastern North America including the first whooping crane chicks to hatch in the wild in Wisconsin in more than a century The two wild whooping crane chicks hatched on June 22 at the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge The wild hatched crane chicks stuck close to their parents on their territory at Necedah NWR for much of the summer until fledging or gaining their flight feathers in early September One of the chicks stayed behind when its parents and sibling moved from their territory and as of today that chick has not been located The other chick a female was leg banded so that she can be tracked by WCEP biologists The WCEP ultralight led migration of the Class of 2006 began on Oct 5 as four ultralight aircraft from project partner Operation Migration led eighteen crane chicks from Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in central Wisconsin The cranes planes and pilots have made slow progress because of unfavourable weather and are currently at a stopover in Boone County Indiana The ultralight led Class of 2006 includes the first crane hatched from the reintroduced eastern migratory whooping crane population Hatched on May 7 at the U S Geological Survey s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel Md Crane 2 06 s parents are whooping cranes 13 a male and 18 a female from the ultralight led crane Class of 2002 In addition to the 18 birds being led south by ultralights biologists from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service reared four whooping cranes at Necedah NWR that were released in the company of older cranes in hopes that the young birds learn the migration route part of WCEP s Direct Autumn Release program which supplements the successful ultralight migrations In 2001 Operation Migration s pilots led the first whooping crane chicks conditioned to follow their ultralight surrogates south from Necedah NWR to Chassahowitzka NWR Each subsequent year WCEP biologists and pilots have conditioned and guided additional groups of juvenile cranes to Chassahowitzka The whooping crane chicks that take part in the reintroduction project are hatched at the U S Geological Survey s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel Md There the young cranes are introduced to ultralight aircraft and raised in isolation from humans To ensure the impressionable cranes remain wild project biologists and pilots adhere to a strict no talking rule broadcast recorded crane calls and wear costumes designed to mask the human form whenever they are around the cranes New classes of cranes are brought to Necedah NWR each June to begin a summer of conditioning behind the ultralights to prepare them for their fall migration Pilots lead the birds on gradually longer training flights at the refuge throughout the summer until the young cranes are deemed ready to follow the aircraft along the

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2006/nr-111006.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: Sixth Group of Endangered
    two wild whooping crane chicks hatched on June 22 at the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge They are offspring of reintroduced whooping crane pair 11 02 male and 17 02 female from the ultralight led class of 2002 The pair nested this spring at the refuge but their egg or eggs were lost likely due to predators They renested and began incubating on May 23 The wild hatched crane chicks dubbed W 01 and W 02 stuck close to their parents on their territory at Necedah NWR for much of the summer until fledging or gaining their flight feathers in early September One of the chicks stayed behind when its parents and sibling moved from their territory and as of today that chick has not been located The other chick a female was recently leg banded with a radio transmitter so that she can be tracked by WCEP biologists In addition to the 18 birds being led south by ultralights biologists from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service are rearing five whooping cranes at Necedah NWR The birds will be released in the company of older cranes in hopes that the young whooping cranes learn the migration route part of WCEP s Direct Autumn Release program which supplements the successful ultralight migrations One of the cranes sustained a wing injury on October 2 The bird is recovering well but it is unknown at this time if he will be released this fall The reintroduction project suffered three mortalities this summer Male whooping crane 17 04 was found dead in late May at the Sandhill State Wildlife Area Wis Crane 2 03 a male was found dead in Monroe County Wis on July 16 The remains of crane 3 02 a female were found on July 25 at Necedah NWR In 2001 Operation Migration s pilots led the first whooping crane chicks conditioned to follow their ultralight surrogates south from Necedah NWR to Chassahowitzka NWR Each subsequent year WCEP biologists and pilots have conditioned and guided additional groups of juvenile cranes to Chassahowitzka The whooping crane chicks that take part in the reintroduction project are hatched at the U S Geological Survey s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel Md There the young cranes are introduced to ultralight aircraft and raised in isolation from humans To ensure the impressionable cranes remain wild project biologists and pilots adhere to a strict no talking rule broadcast recorded crane calls and wear costumes designed to mask the human form whenever they are around the cranes New classes of cranes are brought to Necedah NWR each June to begin a summer of conditioning behind the ultralights to prepare them for their fall migration Pilots lead the birds on gradually longer training flights at the refuge throughout the summer until the young cranes are deemed ready to follow the aircraft along the migration route Most graduated classes of whoopers spend the summer in central Wisconsin where they use areas on or

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2006/nr-100506.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: First Chicks of 2006 Arrive at Necedah
    the field team later this summer This fall the team will use ultralights to guide the young cranes on their first southward migration to Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge on Florida s Gulf coast the cranes winter home During their fall migration and while the reintroduced cranes are in Florida this winter they will receive veterinary support from Disney s Animal Programs veterinary services team based at Walt Disney World Resort WCEP has signed an in kind agreement with Walt Disney World to provide routine and emergency veterinary care diagnostic evaluation and consultation for whooping cranes involved in the WCEP program while they are in Florida and surrounding states For several years the Disney Wildlife Conservation Fund has helped support the financial needs of Operation Migration so it is only natural to take Disney s efforts a step farther through this volunteer effort with our professional staff said Beth Stevens Vice President of Disney s Animal Kingdom and Animal Programs It is not only something we believe in it is something our cast members truly enjoy In addition to the chicks that will migrate behind ultralights WCEP biologists are rearing additional cranes which will be released this fall into the company of older birds at Necedah in the hopes that the chicks will learn the migration route from adult whoopers These cranes hatched at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo Wis WCEP is using this direct autumn release technique to complement the known success of the ultralight led migrations Chicks for direct autumn release are reared in the field and released with older birds after fledging or developing their flight feathers There are currently 65 whooping cranes in the wild as a result of the first five years of reintroductions into the eastern flock Project biologists continue to monitor the veteran cranes from the Classes of 2001 through 2005 Many of these cranes are spending the summer on public and private lands in the central Wisconsin area Three cranes are in the lower peninsula of Michigan WCEP asks anyone who encounters whooping cranes in the wild to please give them the respect and distance they need to remain wild Do not approach birds on foot or in a vehicle within 600 feet and try to remain in your vehicle Do not approach cranes in a vehicle within 300 feet if on a public road Also please remain concealed and do not speak loudly enough that the birds can hear you Finally do not trespass on private property in an attempt to view whooping cranes In 2001 Operation Migration s pilots first led whooping crane chicks conditioned to follow their ultralight surrogates south from Necedah NWR to Chassahowitzka NWR Each subsequent year WCEP biologists and pilots have conditioned and guided additional groups of juvenile cranes to Chassahowitzka NWR Project staff from the International Crane Foundation and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service track and monitor south and northbound cranes in an effort to learn as much as possible about their unassisted

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2006/nr-062706.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: First Chicks Hatched from Eastern Migratory Flock - 2006
    population of whooping cranes back to eastern North America here Home What We Do Who We Are Conservation in Action Get Involved Newsroom Technical Database What To Do If You See Whooping Cranes Visit us on our Social Media sites

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/projectupdates/2006chicks/index.html (2016-05-02)
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