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  • WCEP News Advisory: Second Flock of Experimental Whooping Crane Chicks
    in any way handlers and project biologists will adhere to a strict no talking rule and wear costumes designed to mask the human form whenever they are in the vicinity of the crane chicks The flock of whooping crane chicks has been reared at the Patuxent WRC since hatching from eggs collected from captive whooping cranes at that facility as well as from the International Crane Foundation ICF in Baraboo WI Exposed to aircraft noise since prior to hatching and raised in extreme isolation from humans the chicks specialized training will continue under the direction of pilots and handlers from project partner Operation Migration at the refuge throughout the summer and early autumn This fall the juvenile cranes will migrate guided by ultralight aircraft approximately 1 230 miles to the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge on Florida s central west coast where they will spend the winter in a remote salt marsh area of the refuge Biologists from ICF and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service will monitor the cranes over the winter and will track them as they initiate their return migration north next spring Four of the five endangered whooping cranes from the 2001 ultralight led migration arrived at the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge on April 19 following an 11 day un assisted northern migration The fifth crane arrive back at Necedah two weeks later This historic journey marked the first time in more than a century that Whooping cranes had migrated over the skies of eastern North America The recovery plan for the endangered whooping crane requires that a second flock of migratory birds be established in the eastern half of North America Currently there is only one remaining flock of wild whooping cranes which migrates annually between the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge in south Texas and

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2002/na-6-12-02.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: April 1, 2002 All Migratory Whooping Cranes in Florida Are Healthy
    Twitter Media Advisory All Migratory Whooping Cranes in Florida Are Healthy April 1 2002 The five Necedah Chassahowitzka birds are doing well and biologists are expecting the birds to begin their return north anytime between early April and early May This would be consistent behavior based on the existing Wood Buffalo Aransas migratory flock A story appeared in today s Wisconsin State Journal which says one of the five birds at Chassahowitzka Nantional Wildlife Refuge has a broken beak and will not make the return migration to Wisconsin This is in error The unfortunate bird is part of the NON migratory flock study in central Florida which is under the auspices of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission If your publication has ran a story with the incorrect information we would ask that you consider a correction in your next available edition For more information on the NON migratory flock please contact Henry Cabbage FWCC at 850 488 8843 For information on the migratory bird study please visit other pages on this website or call one of the following WCEP partner media contacts Chuck Underwood USFWS at the number shown below Jennifer Rabuck USFWS Necedah NWR WI 608 565

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2002/advis-4-1-02.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: Second Whooping Crane Killed by Bobcat
    bird s radio transmitter had stopped functioning earlier and biologists had planned to replace it that morning All the birds including 10 had been accounted for during the previous afternoon check The crane s remains were located Saturday afternoon January 19 approximately 900 feet south southwest of the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge wintering site pen a location near a wetland area the birds have used several times for roosting at night Richard Urbanek FWS biologist found the bird s remains while making another sweep of the area in search of the bird It is not believed the radio transmitter failure contributed to the bird s death but it did hamper earlier efforts to locate the bird Bobcats are part of the natural landscape said Jim Kraus refuge manager for the Chassahowitzka NWR While the cranes gain experience in the wild and explore the nearby habitat they will naturally encounter predators We will continue to balance the need for the birds to range freely through the marshes with the need to protect them from this known threat until they gain the necessary experience to survive on their own The wintering pen is constructed with eight foot high mesh fencing that is partially buried to prevent predators from digging under the fence and is surrounded by two rows of electric fencing to discourage predators from approaching the enclosure While this pen offers a secure familiar place for the birds to use it does not restrict the birds daily movements Allowing the birds the freedom to explore their winter home and adapt to being in the wild is a key element in their development of wild behavior While unfortunate in any reintroduction effort losses including to predators are to be expected Biologists report the remaining five whooping cranes appear in good health and

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2002/nr-1-23-02.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: Death of a Whooping Crane
    of an effort to reintroduce a migrating wild flock of the endangered birds in the East Handlers discovered the death shortly after midnight Wednesday The bird s body was transported to the U S G S National Wildlife Health Laboratory in Madison late Wednesday for necropsy Preliminary results indicate the cause of death may be related to stress from a routine health check and leg banding procedure performed on all ten birds Tuesday The remaining nine birds are doing fine according to veterinarians and biologists monitoring and training the flock A complete report on the cause of death won t be available until tissue samples are completely analyzed which will take several days We fully anticipated the possibility of losing a bird or birds in planning this project said Steve Miller Division of Land Administrator at the DNR As much as we want every one of these valuable animals to survive this project is a study and there has always been the possibility that we d lose a bird during training migration wintering over or on their return in spring Every effort is being taken by our biologists veterinarians and project partners to prevent such losses While the loss of even one of these magnificent endangered creatures is tragic the project will continue to move forward We will investigate the circumstances surrounding the loss using what we learn to reduce the likelihood of additional losses The bird appeared to be fine immediately following the health check and banding procedure said International Crane Foundation veterinarian Dr Barry Hartup But shortly after being returned to its pen it showed signs of stress and abnormal behavior It was removed to another facility on the refuge property for observation and was treated throughout the day Shortly after midnight a biologist checking on the bird

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2001/nr-91401.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: Ultra-light led whooping crane historic migration flight 
    planned departure of a small flock of whooping cranes from Necedah National Wildlife Refuge was postponed for at least 24 hours this morning when winds in the refuge area proved too strong for safe departure The migration team awoke to clear bright skies but the winds were judged too strong for flying according to the pilots and crane handlers said Bob Manwell Department of Natural Resources spokesperson Winds make it

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2001/nr-101501.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: WEATHER DELAYS MIGRATION ANOTHER DAY
    south of Necedah National Wildlife Refuge have resulted in another day s delay in departing the refuge with a small flock of whooping cranes behind ultralight aircraft All three ultralight pilots took off to test the conditions and agreed it was too trashy It looked reasonable on the ground but halfway to the pen we became aware of just how rough it was said Bill Lishman co founder of Operation

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2001/nr-101601.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: High Winds Result in Loss of One Crane
    October 24 2001 migration team members Deke Clark and Dan Sprague discovered that extremely high winds at the bird s isolated site had partially toppled the pen structure and that the birds had dispersed into the surrounding area The team members discovered the situation when they went to check on the birds because of concern over the increased winds An immediate search of the surrounding area was initiated with Joe Duff and Richard Van Heuvelen joining in the costumed search using recorded crane calls Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership WCEP members Kelly Maguire Julie Langenberg and Richard Urbanek responded to assist on site members with locating the wandering birds using radio tracking receivers and antennae Shortly after 2 a m Thursday all but one bird had been located and returned to the restored holding pen The eighth bird referred to as number 3 and outfitted with a radio transmitter was located by Langenberg and Maguire at approximately 10 a m Thursday morning Unfortunately the bird was found dead beneath a power line and likely collided with the line The exact cause of death will not be known until a necropsy is completed The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration s NOAA local

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2001/nr-101701.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: Weather Delays Whooper Migration Progress
    of the whooping crane migration study We d hoped to move another twenty one miles south said Joe Duff lead pilot for Operation Migration but the weather isn t cooperating Last night at 5 20 p m the tracking and capture team retrieved bird 4 at Wisconsin Department of Natural Recources s Meadow Valley State Wildlife Area and brought it by truck to the Adams County site Plans now are

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2001/nr-101801.html (2016-05-02)
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