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  • WCEP: Wayward Crane Returns to Migration
    banded and rigged with a radio transmitter managed to elude detection of biologists from the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge NWR and International Crane Foundation ICF for the first couple of hours However once its signal was picked up by the trackers it amazed them by spending the next few hours soaring high into the skies over Adams and Juneau counties in central Wisconsin Then according to Dan Sprague crane biologist with the migration team confused and a little frightened it did what comes naturally and returned to an area it was more familiar with We tracked the bird to a spot just west of the refuge Sprague said It is likely it was trying to locate the training site at Necedah NWR and was probably too high and missed the mark Tracking a moving bird is a challenge even under the best conditions but add in the rolling hills and valleys of central Wisconsin and it becomes a true adventure When the bird dips below the tree line or lands we can lose the signal said Richard Urbanek crane biologist with the Necedah NWR With only a five mile range on the transmitters having a signal pop up and then

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2001/nr-101901.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: Second Flock of Experimental Whooping Crane Chicks Arrive at Necedah National Wildlife Refuge
    any way handlers and project biologists will adhere to a strict no talking rule and wear costumes designed to mask the human form whenever they are in the vicinity of the crane chicks The flock of whooping crane chicks has been reared at the Patuxent WRC since hatching from eggs collected from captive whooping cranes at that facility as well as from the International Crane Foundation ICF in Baraboo WI Exposed to aircraft noise since prior to hatching and raised in extreme isolation from humans the chicks specialized training will continue under the direction of pilots and handlers from project partner Operation Migration at the refuge throughout the summer and early autumn This fall the juvenile cranes will migrate guided by ultralight aircraft approximately 1 230 miles to the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge on Florida s central west coast where they will spend the winter in a remote salt marsh area of the refuge Biologists from ICF and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service will monitor the cranes over the winter and will track them as they initiate their return migration north next spring Four of the five endangered whooping cranes from the 2001 ultralight led migration arrived at the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge on April 19 following an 11 day un assisted northern migration The fifth crane arrive back at Necedah two weeks later This historic journey marked the first time in more than a century that Whooping cranes had migrated over the skies of eastern North America The recovery plan for the endangered whooping crane requires that a second flock of migratory birds be established in the eastern half of North America Currently there is only one remaining flock of wild whooping cranes which migrates annually between the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge in south Texas and Wood

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2001/na-110301.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: Whooping Cranes Arrive in Florida Today
    only migratory population of whooping cranes winters at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge on the Texas Gulf Coast and is vulnerable to a catastrophic event such as a major hurricane disease or oil spill This reintroduction would not only restore the whooping crane to part of its historic range but also provide another geographically distinct migratory population that could lead to downlisting and eventual recovery In 1998 a coalition of state and federal governments and the private sector formed the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership to coordinate and fund last year s sandhill crane study and this year s whooping crane study Over 35 private landowners have volunteered their property as stopover sites for the cranes and migration team A temporary pen keeps the cranes safe from predators between each morning s flight The total migration is expected to take from five to seven weeks Establishment of a migratory population of whooping cranes would be a valuable complement to the resident population of whooping cranes we began establishing in 1993 said Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Executive Director Dr Allan L Egbert We and the U S Fish and Wildlife Service are making significant progress in our battle to save whooping cranes from the threat of extinction The whooping crane named for its loud and penetrating call is one of America s best known and rarest endangered species This species lives and breeds in extensive wetlands where it feeds upon crabs clams frogs and other aquatic organisms Whooping cranes stand five feet tall and are pure white in color with black wing tips and a red crown Founding members of the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership are the International Crane Foundation International Whooping Crane Recovery Team Operation Migration Inc National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin U S Fish

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2001/nr-11-25-01.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: Longest Flight of Endangered Whooping Cranes and Ultralight Aircraft Successfully Ends
    journey landing in a secluded location early this morning The cranes will move to their final winter home tomorrow when the costumed pilots lead the birds to a remote isolated site on the U S Fish and Wildlife Service s Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge The arrival in Citrus County marks the end of a historic first step to reintroduce a migratory flock of whooping cranes into eastern North America Over the next four years additional whooping cranes will be introduced to the southern migratory route from Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in central Wisconsin to Florida s central west coast Ultimately it is hoped the project will establishment a self sustaining flock of at least 25 breeding crane pairs In order to maintain their wild nature the young whooping cranes raised by costumed handlers and in isolation will continue to interact only with costumed biologists and not be exposed to humans A temporary feeding station and night pen will be provided for a few days after which they will be allowed to come and go as they choose Throughout the winter the cranes will have fresh water and feed provided as a supplement to their daily natural diets They will also be monitored by biologists and tracked on their return route in the spring of 2002 Whooping cranes are the most endangered crane on earth having recovered from a low of only 21 birds in 1941 to slightly over 400 today Nearly half of that number however live in one wild migrating flock that moves between Wood Buffalo National Park in the Northwest Territories of Canada and Aransas National Wildlife Refuge managed by the U S Fish and Wildlife Service on the Gulf Coast of Texas and are subject to hurricanes contaminants and disease To help ensure the species survival the

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2001/nr-12-03-01.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: Whooping Crane Killed by Bobcat
    a migratory reintroduction study was killed by a bobcat yesteday A U S Fish and Wildlife Service biologist monitoring the birds discovered that the bird referred to as number four 4 had been killed by a bobcat during a routine check on the birds Monday morning All the birds had been accounted for during the previous afternoon check The crane was located approximately 40 yards outside the protected pen The other six whooping cranes were found safe inside the pen A necropsy performed by Dr Marilyn Spalding University of Florida veterinarian indicated the death was consistant with a bobcat kill and that bird 4 was otherwise in good health and condition Every effort has been made to provide for the safety of these birds said Jim Kraus refuge manager for the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge where the birds are located and while it is unfortunate we lost a bird it does not come as a surprise Predation has always been a possibility and is part of the natural order It is also why we went to great lengths to provide as safe an enclosure as we could while still allowing the birds to develop their independence and wildness The pen is constructed with eight foot high mesh fencing that is partially buried to prevent predators from digging under the fence and is surrounded by two rows of electric fencing to discourage predators from approaching the enclosure Bird 4 was found outside of this enclosure USFWS biologist Richard Urbanek and International Crane Foundation biologist Marianne Wellington are monitoring the site during the birds winter stay at the refuge A bobcat was successfully live trapped at the site earlier today and relocated to reduce the danger to the remaining birds The whooping crane reintroduction study is a cooperative effort of WCEP public

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2001/nr-12-18-01.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: Whooping Cranes Acclimating to Chassahowitzka
    to the area It has been two weeks since the birds landed in the salt marsh after a long migration that took 50 days to fly approximately 1 224 miles The whooping cranes are in a soft release process where they are encouraged to roost in the protective pen at night The pen is constructed with eight foot high mesh fencing that is partially buried to prevent predators from digging under the fence The mesh fence is surrounded by three rows of electric wire fencing to discourage predators from approaching the enclosure During the day they are free to come and go foraging and flying around the refuge USFWS biologist Richard Urbanek and International Crane Foundation assistant curator Marianne Wellington are monitoring the site Unfortunately on December 17 crane number four was found dead approximately 40 yards outside the pen during a routine check on the birds by a U S Fish and Wildlife Service biologist A University of Florida veterinarian Dr Marilyn Spalding determined the cause of death to be consistent with a bobcat kill The bobcat was successfully live trapped Monday evening and relocated to reduce the danger to the remaining birds Every effort has been made to provide for the safety of these birds said Jim Kraus Refuge Manager for the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge where the birds are located and while it is unfortunate we lost a bird it does not come as a surprise Predation has always been a possibility and is part of the natural order It is also why we went to great lengths to provide as safe an enclosure as we could while still allowing the birds to develop their independence and wildness The whooping crane reintroduction study is a cooperative effort of WCEP public and private partners and aims to re

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2001/nr-12-20-01.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: 2010 Banding Whooping Crane Chicks - Slide 2
    to eastern North America here Home What We Do Who We Are Conservation in Action Get Involved Newsroom Technical Database Visit us on our Social Media sites Facebook Flickr YouTube Twitter Banding Wild Whooping Crane Chicks Checking the bands to

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/projectupdates/2010/2010bandingphotos/2checkingbands.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: External Review Talking Points
    parts of our current process may need to be eliminated altogether The review team was tasked with evaluating three main issues 1 whether WCEP is operating in a way that will achieve the restoration of an eastern migratory flock of whooping cranes 2 the scientific underpinning of WCEP s methods and procedures and 3 the methods and procedures that WCEP currently uses for decision making internal communication planning and executing management decisions WCEP extends our sincere thanks and appreciation to the five member review team The review team brought their substantial expertise to bear on the three main issues and provided us with a comprehensive report and recommendations In their review they addressed the strengths and shortcomings of both the reintroduction project and the overall structure of WCEP The review team commended all those working on the reintroduction for tireless efforts and dedication The team was very complimentary of WCEP for what has been accomplished in the face of limited funding At the same time several recommendations were made by the review team to address shortcomings they saw or areas needing more attention including more focus on habitat needs of breeding birds making scientific research more central in decision making

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/whoweare/ExternalReviewTalkingPts.html (2016-05-02)
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