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  • WCEP News Release - May. 5, 2013: Study on Whooping Crane Nesting Success
    Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis Bti a naturally occurring soil bacterium used as an alternative to chemical pesticides to control insects Bti is the most common environmentally safe way to reduce adult black fly numbers Follow up assessments found that the treatments during the two year study significantly reduced black fly numbers during the whooping crane nesting season This spring no Bti treatment was applied allowing researchers to differentiate between the increasing experience of the nesting birds at Necedah NWR and the effect of black flies Twenty whooping crane pairs have initiated nests this spring so far Seventeen of those nests were abandoned during a four day period from May 4 7 Nineteen eggs were collected from the abandoned nests At the time of egg collection dense clouds of black flies were observed at the nests Several of the collected eggs have been determined to be fertile and are currently being incubated at the International Crane Foundation They will be used in whooping crane reintroduction efforts This study is critical to guide future decisions for how to manage whooping cranes that currently nest within the area affected by black flies as well as where else we can work to re establish whooping cranes in Wisconsin and in the Upper Midwest said Jeb Barzen Director of Field Ecology International Crane Foundation Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s Today there are only about 600 birds in existence approximately 445 of them in the wild Aside from the 106 birds in the WCEP population the only other migrating population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta Canada and winters at Aransas NWR on the Texas Gulf Coast A non migrating flock of approximately 20 birds lives year round in the central Florida Kissimmee region and

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2013/nr15May2013.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP News Release (Arpil 10, 2013): 2013 Whooping Crane Spring Migration is Underway
    whooping crane chicks produced in the wild The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources DNR is excited about the news of the return of last year s chicks back to Wisconsin both those that were released and the two that were wild hatched We will continue to follow their progress closely and hope that the birds eventually become successful parents in the years to come said Erin Crain Director DNR Bureau of Endangered Resources As part of these efforts the Wisconsin DNR is also looking forward to the third year of releases at White River Marsh State Wildlife Area and Horicon National Wildlife Refuge Thanks to the efforts of WCEP there are now 108 whooping cranes in the wild in eastern North America which was part of their historic range Whooping cranes that take part in the ultralight and DAR reintroductions are hatched at the U S Geological Survey s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel Md and at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo Wis Chicks are raised under a strict protocol that avoids conditioning the young birds to people and seeks to ensure the birds remain wild Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s Today there are only about 600 birds in existence approximately 445 of them in the wild Aside from the 108 WCEP birds the only other migrating population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta Canada and winters at Aransas NWR on the Texas Gulf Coast A non migrating flock of approximately 20 birds lives year round in the central Florida Kissimmee region and an additional 14 non migratory cranes live in southern Louisiana WCEP asks anyone who encounters a whooping crane in the wild to please give them the respect and distance they need Do not

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2013/nr10April2013.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP News Release (Feb. 11, 2013): Injured Whooping Crane Released into the Wild at Hiwassee
    National Wildlife Refuge Wisconsin it linked up with five other young of the year birds and migrated together ending up the furthest south so far of any bird in this population since releases began in 2001 This is the first time whooping cranes have reached the Everglades foraging in Hendry County Southwest of Okeechobee at remote cattle ranches In early January two cranes showed up at the interface of wetlands and suburbia on the eastern side of the Everglades in Broward and Dade Counties Members of the public reported that one of the birds was limping This bird later showed signs of distress acting listless with an apparent injury to her right foot The partnership team responsible conducted a quick but thorough discussion to determine the best possible outcomes weighing the risks of capture with the benefits of medical treatment and possible relocation Whooping crane 13 12 flying to join hundreds of sandhill cranes after being released at Hiawassee Wildlife Refuge in Meigs County Tenn on Saturday Feb 9 following successful surgery and rehabilitation at Disney Animal Kingdom Photo by Eva Szyszkoski International Crane Foundation Public domain We chose to capture this injured whooping crane and it has turned out to be the right call said Billy Brooks Whooping Crane Coordinator for the U S Fish and Wildlife Service for the Eastern Migratory Population Because of the efforts of Dr Scott Terrell DVM at Disney and that of the capture team we were able to get this bird healthy and back out into the wild She was captured on January 26 and transported to Disney s Animal Kingdom where her right middle toe was amputated due to an injury and subsequent infection The veterinarians maintained an isolation protocol operating in costume without using human voices as they treated the bird

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2013/nr11feb2013.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP News Release (Oct. 31, 2012): Young Whooping Cranes Begin Fall Migration
    mate in the Hahira GA area Cranes have typically been seen wintering in this area over the last five years Since December 30 3 07 s mate has repeatedly been seen by various people hanging out by itself or with another pair Since paired whooping cranes tend to not stray too far from one another it is feared that 3 07 may be dead due to unknown causes The efforts to reintroduce these birds are still in their relative infancy and there are currently only about 114 cranes in this eastern migratory population Due to the importance of every bird WCEP places color coded bands and transmitters on each in order to track its whereabouts consequently trying to determine the status and location of a missing bird is of utmost importance Identifying the cause of death for birds that die in this population not only allows WCEP to track the population s status it also informs us of risks to the birds that we may be able to reduce or eliminate in the future e g in the case of trauma WCEP and its partners have been unable to locate the missing bird via radio tracking during recent search efforts in the area Crane 3 07 is identifiable by its color coded leg bands it is banded with red above green bands on its left leg and red above green above white bands on its right leg Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s Today there are only about 600 birds in existence approximately 450 of them in the wild Aside from the WCEP birds the only other migratory population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta Canada and winters at Aransas NWR on the Texas Gulf Coast A non migratory

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2013/nr11jan2013.html (2016-05-02)
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  • USFWS News Release (Dec. 4, 2012): Citizen Tip Helps Close the Knox County Whooping Crane Case
    the shooting of a whooping crane in Knox County Indiana Wildlife law enforcement agents with the U S Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement and Indiana Department of Natural Resources investigated the case and report that a plea agreement has been reached The crane was last observed alive by an International Crane Foundation volunteer on Saturday January 07 2012 On January 21 2012 an Indiana Department of Natural Resources Conservation Officer received voluntary information from a citizen concerning the possible shooting of a whooping crane which led to charges against McCarter and Burke The whooping crane killed was taught its migratory path by ultra light aircraft and belonged to a nesting pair and was one of approximately 100 birds left in the eastern fly way Burke and McCarter were charged and sentenced in United States District Court in Terre Haute Ind As part of the plea agreement Burke and McCarter each received three years probation are required to pay a donation of 5 000 to the International Crane Foundation must perform 120 hours community service at the Indiana Department of Natural Resources Goose Pond Fish and Wildlife Area and are not allowed to hunt during the term of the probation In addition to the Endangered Species Act whooping cranes are protected by the Federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act and state laws An investigation into the killing of a second whooping crane in Jackson County continues Anyone with information can call the Turn In A Poacher hotline at 1 800 TIP IDNR To learn more about USFWS wildlife conservation efforts visit http www fws gov midwest LawEnforcement For more information about whooping crane recovery and the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership visit http www bringbackthecranes org For more information on the Midwest Region of the U S Fish and Wildlife

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2012/nr4Dec2012.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP News Release (Nov. 27, 2012): Ultralight-led Whooping Cranes Arrive at Wintering Destination in Florida
    are now 115 whooping cranes in the wild in eastern North America thanks to WCEP s efforts This is the earliest the birds have arrived at St Marks and we are thrilled to have them here so soon said Terry Peacock Refuge Manager at St Marks NWR I was in the blind at the pen site to watch the birds arrive I just have to say that it never gets old watching the birds come to the refuge It was as touching this time as it was the first time In addition to the five birds led south by WCEP partner Operation Migration s ultralights six cranes are making their first southward migration as part of WCEP s Direct Autumn Release DAR program The DAR cranes were hatched and raised by biologists with project partner International Crane Foundation The six birds were released in the company of older cranes from whom the young birds learn the migration route south Five of the DAR cranes have completed their migration and are located in Hendry County Florida The sixth bird is currently located at Jasper Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area in Pulaski County Indiana The ultralight led and DAR cranes this year are joining two wild hatched chicks in the 2012 cohort Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s Today there are only about 600 birds in existence approximately 445 of them in the wild Aside from the WCEP birds the only other migratory population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta Canada and winters at Aransas NWR on the Texas Gulf Coast A non migratory flock of approximately 20 birds lives year round in the central Florida Kissimmee region and an additional 14 non migratory cranes live in southern Louisiana WCEP asks

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2012/nr27nov2012.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP News Release: Ultralight Whooping Cranes Soar into Walker County, Alabama on Their Way to Florida
    four hours to the next stopover site in Chilton County Alabama The five ultralight led cranes completing their first fall migration left White River Marsh State Wildlife Area in Green Lake County Wisconsin on September 28 and are heading for St Marks National Wildlife Refuge in the Florida panhandle They have traveled 746 of the 1 101 miles to their destination Compared to the last few years the ultralight led migration is making good time said Operation Migration Inc CEO Joe Duff Other than one stretch of bad weather in northern Illinois we ve made good progress so perhaps the earlier start date this year has paid off We re encouraged that at the current pace we will return to the pre Christmas finish time of earlier migrations To catch a rare glimpse of these whooping cranes birders wildlife enthusiasts conservationists and the general public are invited to gather to watch flyovers as the ultralight led flock departs each stopover location For all flyover locations visit http www operationmigration org FLYOVERS2012 pdf These five juvenile whooping cranes and others that took part in the previous eleven ultralight reintroductions are hatched at the U S Geological Survey s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel Maryland and at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo Wisconsin Chicks are raised under a strict isolation protocol and to ensure the birds remain wild handlers adhere to a no talking rule and wear costumes designed to mask the human form Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s Today there are only about 600 birds in existence approximately 445 of them in the wild Aside from the WCEP birds the only other migratory population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta Canada and winters at Aransas NWR on

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2012/nrFWS14Nov2012.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP News Release (Oct. 31, 2012): Young Whooping Cranes Begin Fall Migration
    The six birds were released in the company of older cranes from whom the young birds will learn the migration route south Everyone at ICF is happy to see these birds released 2012 has been a challenging year ICF s aviculture and veterinary staff has worked tremendously hard to get these six cranes into the field and are to be congratulated said Dr Barry Hartup Director of Veterinary Services at ICF Of course we couldn t accomplish this without all of the generous support of individuals and foundations committed to the recovery of this iconic species thank you Biologists from ICF are tracking the released cranes using radio and satellite telemetry picking up signals emitted from leg transmitters on the birds In addition to the six DAR birds five juvenile whooping cranes are being led south by project partner Operation Migration s ultralight aircraft The cranes left the White River Marsh State Wildlife Area in Green Lake County Wis on September 28 The ultralight led birds are currently in Piatt County Illinois The ultralight led and DAR chicks this year are joining two wild hatched chicks in the 2012 cohort Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s Today there are only about 600 birds in existence approximately 445 of them in the wild Aside from the WCEP birds the only other migratory population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta Canada and winters at Aransas NWR on the Texas Gulf Coast A non migratory flock of approximately 20 birds lives year round in the central Florida Kissimmee region and an additional 14 non migratory cranes live in southern Louisiana WCEP asks anyone who encounters a whooping crane in the wild to please give them the respect and distance they need Do

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2012/nr31oct2012.html (2016-05-02)
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