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  • Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership: Endangered Whooping Cranes Depart on Ultralight-guided Flight to Florid
    learn something new about these wonderful birds said Joe Duff CEO of Operation Migration and leader of the ultralight team This year s flock seems more attentive and we hope to make better progress Our target is to arrive in Florida before Christmas In addition to the six birds being led south by ultralights biologists from WCEP partner International Crane Foundation are currently rearing six whooping crane chicks at Horicon NWR in Dodge County Wis The birds will be released later this fall in the company of older cranes from whom the young birds will learn the migration route south This is the eighth year WCEP has used this Direct Autumn Release DAR method Whooping cranes that take part in the ultralight and DAR reintroductions are hatched at the U S Geological Survey s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel Md and at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo Wis Chicks are raised under a strict isolation protocol and to ensure the birds remain wild handlers adhere to a no talking rule and wear costumes designed to mask the human form The 12 ultralight led and DAR chicks are joining two wild hatched chicks in the 2012 cohort These two wild raised chicks will follow their respective parents on migration In addition to the 14 juvenile cranes 102 whooping cranes are currently in the eastern migratory population Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s Today there are only about 600 birds in existence approximately 445 of them in the wild Aside from the WCEP birds the only other migratory population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta Canada and winters at Aransas NWR on the Texas Gulf Coast A non migratory flock of approximately 20 birds lives year round in the

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2012/nr2oct2012.html (2016-05-02)
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  • WCEP: News Release Sept. 7, 2012 - Young Whooping Cranes Will Learn Migration Route from their Elders
    refuges they remain under the watchful eye and supervision of costumed biologists from WCEP project partner International Crane Foundation In mid late October the cranes will be released on Horicon NWR in the company of older cranes The young DAR whooping cranes learn the migration route south by following these older birds The staff at Horicon NWR is excited about the arrival of this year s DAR chicks and is glad to be working with such great partners on this reintroduction project said Steve Lenz Project Leader for the Horicon NWR Leopold Wetland Management District Complex In addition to the six DAR birds six whooping crane chicks are currently being conditioned to follow ultralight aircraft by WCEP partner Operation Migration at the White River Marsh State Wildlife Area in Green Lake and Marquette Counties Wis Thanks to the efforts of WCEP there are now 104 whooping cranes in the eastern migratory population WCEP celebrated a milestone this summer with a record number of chicks hatched in the wild Nine chicks hatched to eight pairs of cranes Two of the chicks W1 12 and W8 12 survived to fledging In total 24 whooping crane chicks have hatched in this population since 2006 Five of them including W1 12 and W8 12 have fledged and joined the wild population Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s Today there are only about 600 birds in existence approximately 445 of them in the wild Aside from the 104 WCEP birds the only other migratory population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta Canada and winters at Aransas NWR on the Texas Gulf Coast A non migratory flock of approximately 20 birds lives year round in the central Florida Kissimmee region and an additional 17 non

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2012/nr7Sept2012.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership - June 27, 2012 News Release
    and Marquette Counties This is only the second year that this new site has been utilized The cranes will spend the summer with Operation Migration staff getting acclimated gaining strength and learning to follow the planes This fall Operation Migration will guide the young birds on their first southward migration to the Gulf coast of Florida the cranes winter home These birds represent a portion of the 12th group of endangered whooping cranes to take part in a project conducted by WCEP a coalition of public and private organizations that is reintroducing a migratory flock of whooping cranes into eastern North America part of their historic range An additional batch of chicks will be migrating south as part of WCEP s Direct Autumn Release project Biologists from the International Crane Foundation rear whooping crane chicks that are released in the fall in the company of older cranes from which the young birds then learn the migration route The DAR cranes will be released on the Horicon National Wildlife Refuge in Dodge County WI early this fall There are now over 100 wild cranes in this population all of which with the exception of 3 wild hatches were released using the above two methods Most of the whooping cranes released in previous years spend the summer in central Wisconsin where they use areas on or near Necedah National Wildlife Refuge as well as other public and private lands WCEP asks anyone who encounters a whooping crane in the wild to please give them the respect and distance they need Do not approach birds on foot within 200 yards remain in your vehicle do not approach in a vehicle within 100 yards Also please remain concealed and do not speak loudly enough that the birds can hear you Finally do not trespass

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2012/nr27June2012.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership - Home Page
    completed an investigation into the killing of a male whooping crane that took place in early January in Knox County The Knox County Prosecutor is reviewing the case and charges are pending against Jason R McCarter 21 of Wheatland and John C Burke 23 of Monroe City According to the case report filed with the prosecutor ICO Joe Haywood received information in mid January that a whooping crane had been spotlighted at night and shot and killed with a high powered rifle The ensuing investigation involved multiple law enforcement agencies wildlife biologists and private individuals and provided information that identified the suspects and also linked the bird to a federal program to reintroduce whooping cranes in the eastern United States Whooping cranes are an endangered species protected by both state and federal laws Efforts to save whooping cranes began after their nationwide population dwindled to 15 birds in 1941 according to the International Crane Foundation The Foundation reports there are nearly 600 whooping cranes today with approximately 445 in the wild There are more than 100 in the eastern reintroduction flock that travels through Indiana on a migratory path between Wisconsin and Florida Roughly 150 captive raised birds are used

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2012/nr16May2012.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership - Home Page
    of 2002 and 2004 The pair has laid eggs every year since 2008 but until this year their eggs have always been infertile The pair proved to be good parents in 2010 when their infertile egg was replaced with a captive produced whooping crane egg and the pair hatched and raised the chick to fledging This is an unexpected surprise and we are happy this pair is now producing on their own They are experienced parents and hopefully they will raise their chick to fledging age again this year said Dr Barry Hartup co chair of the WCEP Guidance Team and International Crane Foundation veterinarian This also shows the great conservation value of private lands in central Wisconsin and the wonderful cooperation and interest shown by landowners in the recovery of the whooping crane Thanks to the efforts of WCEP there are now 106 whooping cranes in the eastern migratory population In addition to 12 02 and 19 04 fourteen other pairs are currently incubating and we are optimistic that more chicks will hatch in the weeks ahead Including W1 12 sixteen chicks have hatched in this population since 2006 Three of them have fledged and joined the wild population Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s Today there are only about 600 birds in existence approximately 445 of them in the wild Aside from the 106 WCEP birds the only other migratory population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta Canada and winters at Aransas NWR on the Texas Gulf Coast A non migratory flock of approximately 20 birds lives year round in the central Florida Kissimmee region and an additional 17 non migratory cranes live in southern Louisiana WCEP asks anyone who encounters a whooping crane in the wild

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2012/nr1May2012.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership - Home Page
    migration back to Wisconsin Two DAR cranes are in Dubois County Ind one was reported in Fayette County Ill on March 26 and one has not been seen since leaving on fall migration The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources DNR is excited about the news of the return of last year s chicks back to Wisconsin We will continue to follow their progress closely and hope that the birds eventually return to their release grounds in east central Wisconsin said Cathy Stepp Wisconsin DNR Secretary As part of these efforts the Wisconsin DNR is also looking forward to the second year of releases at White River Marsh State Wildlife Area and Horicon NWR Thanks to the efforts of WCEP there are now 106 whooping cranes in the wild in eastern North America which was part of their historic range Most of these whooping cranes have completed their spring migration Of the cranes that have returned to Wisconsin 13 pairs have initiated nests and eight nests are still active Five of the nests are located on Necedah NWR and three nests are located off the refuge Whooping cranes that take part in the ultralight and DAR reintroductions are hatched at the U S Geological Survey s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel Md and at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo Wis Chicks are raised under a strict protocol that avoids conditioning the young birds to people and seeks to ensure the birds remain wild Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s Today there are only about 600 birds in existence approximately 445 of them in the wild Aside from the 106 WCEP birds the only other migrating population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta Canada and winters at Aransas NWR

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2012/nr17April2012.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership - Home Page
    previous location or that have not been reported for over one month General Maximum size of the eastern migratory population at the end of the report period was 107 birds 54 males and 53 females Estimated distribution at the end of the report period or last record included 70 whooping cranes in Wisconsin 4 in Indiana 9 in Alabama 4 in Tennessee 4 in Florida 14 at unknown locations and 2 long term missing 2011 Cohort Of the eight 2011 Direct Autumn Release juveniles two 15 11 and 18 11 are in Marquette County Wisconsin two 17 11 and 20 11 remain at the Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge in Tennessee one 14 11 is in LaPorte and St Joseph Counties Indiana one 19 11 was last reported in Fayette County Illinois on 9 February one 16 11 was last reported in Jackson County Indiana on 8 March but has left the area and one 13 11 was last detected on autumn migration in northern Illinois on 29 November The juvenile 2 11 that broke of from the ultralight led migration on 21 October was last confirmed at the Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge in Tennessee on 16 February The nine remaining juveniles in

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/technicaldatabase/projectupdates/2012/March2012Update.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership - Home Page
    want to discourage people from observing whooping cranes in the wild and reporting their sightings we do want to remind people that for the benefit of the cranes it is best if people keep their distance Approaching cranes too closely can result in the birds becoming habituated to humans Habituation in turn can have negative consequences It is very important that these birds stay wild If a habituated bird feels threatened it can become aggressive towards humans and domestic animals When this occurs WCEP is obligated to remove them and that represents a huge loss to the program and jeopardizes its chances of success Fortunately to date only two birds have had to be removed from the wild An additional issue is that habituated cranes can be at risk from people who mean them harm and while such situations are uncommon it is unfortunately a consideration in light of recent shooting deaths in Indiana Alabama and Georgia Observation Distances WCEP asks anyone who encounters a whooping crane in the wild to please give them the respect and they distance they need If you re on foot do not approach the birds within 200 yards if in a vehicle remain inside

    Original URL path: http://www.bringbackthecranes.org/newsroom/2012/KeepDistanceApril2012.html (2016-05-02)
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